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EB15: Acros converts A-GE hydro shifting to 1×11, lets you customize the sound of new hubs

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Acros’ A-GE hydraulic shifting group drops the front derailleur for their new 1×11 system, making it the lightest shifter/derailleur combo we’ve seen.

The rear mech’s upper knuckle has been better optimized and slimmed down, which saved weight and looks better. Other changes were made to keep up with trends, too, and they’ve just finished brand new hubs…

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It also gets a elastomer damping system inside the pulley cage pivot to keep the chain from bouncing. Not exactly a clutch, but same idea. The wound spring that’s visible here is the tension spring.

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Entire system weighs just 288g wth hydraulic fluid inside and everything. Max 42T cog, and it’ll work with SRAM or Shimano cassettes.

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The shifter can push up to four inboard shifts and two outboard. Available with a matchmaker mount to fit with SRAM / Avid brakes. Retail for the group is €849.

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New road hubs with use a ring ratchet system much like DT Swiss’ but with 38 teeth.

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What makes it different is the ability to change the amount of tension between the two ratchet rings. Three springs on the backside slot into three different sets of holes, all with different depths. Moving it between them let’s you customize the loudness of the hub, but performance is the same. So, stealth mode or “look at me!”

They’ll work with all common road axle systems with end cap changes.

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Inside them all, including these new mountain bike hubs, is a larger 19mm axle to make them a lot stiffer.

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They get a new preload adjustment cakes The Clam. It’s a sandwiched system that uses ramps to spread them and reduce play. Tighten the screw and it spreads them more to take up any slack in the system.

These new design features spread to XC, freeride, Boost and single speed mountain bike hubs, too.

They can be ordered as prebuilt wheels, too, with Stan’s Crest, Ryde Race Trail or WTB Asym i29 rims. Available in XC, trail/enduro and gravity builds.

Acros.de

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11 Comments
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Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

That’s some spring on the rear mech. I’d love to try these out…hope they actually make it to market this go around

Antoine
Antoine
7 years ago

Acros AGE made it to market. I remember some places to buy it. Don’t know if its still available.

abc
abc
7 years ago

I’m so stoked on the 11sp A-GE, it seems they adressed some weaknesses of the previous system. I need this!

Bazz
Bazz
7 years ago

No clutch on the rear derailleur?

xc-fr
xc-fr
7 years ago

am i right: it is a freehubbody made of aluminium – and the ratchet is fixed at the freehubbody (one part) –> this is an constructional defect. the same poor constructional defect as with extralite hubs. with this construction the freehubbody became also a fast wearing part. its a nogo.
beside that: did they manage to fix the freehubbody that it don’t fell of when the wheel is not mounted in a frame as it was with the old acros hubs?
btw: the ratchet system is not like DT. it is much more like Syntace.

mrazekan
mrazekan
7 years ago

@xc-fr,

Look at the picture where the three springs are shown. The end of the axle has threads cut on the I.D. it looks like the end cap threads into the axle to reattain the freehub body.

duder
duder
7 years ago

That hydraulic system looks sweet, but…

> Retail for the group is €849.

I think I’ll pass. If it was in the $300-400 USD range I might try it..

ginsu
ginsu
7 years ago

The hydro-shifter is really cool. Just don’t know why they went all CNC bling and didn’t make a ‘common-man’ priced version. Seriously, you need to refine the mechanism by using large volume production. The current design could only ever be produced at low volumes and thus have high prices. I’d really rather see a Shimano version of this. It’s too bad Shimano is such a lagging manufacturer.

heftylefty
heftylefty
7 years ago

@ginsu IMO, Shimano’s “lag” and their ability to consistently bring affordable, reliable, high-performing product to market are related. It takes a lot of R+D time to make very good stuff!

heatwave23
heatwave23
7 years ago

I get so sick about hearing about the R&D cost as a way to justify high prices for cycling products. Shimano introduced STI shifting ~1990 and in the grand scheme of thing only made minor modifications to it until the release of Di2 in 2009. Again for the past 6 years only minor improvements have been made to Di2….
It appears they are spending way more money on marketing and patents than R&D.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
7 years ago

@ginsu, they are probably using CNC because of tooling costs. It costs a lot to tool up a forging or an injection molded part like Magura’s molded CF brakes. At a guess Acros doesn’t have the current or anticipated sales volume to pay off the tooling. Since their previous hydro shifting group also sold poorly they are probably trying to keep their investment as low as possible.

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