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EB17: Miranda X-MOD carbon and titanium crankset is crazy light, fits anything

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross
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The Miranda X-Mod crankset is already one of the lightest complete cranksets we’ve ever seen, and it’ss almost ready for production. They’ve been putting it through the wringer and say it’s rated for Enduro, tested on downhill. And the modular design means it’ll work just as well faor road, cyclocross and gravel bikes, too. Or fat bikes, thanks to various spindle widths. And crank arm lengths. Boost or not. There’s really no combination they’re not already planning or considering.

But they’re still trying to shave a few more grams off it…

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset actual weight of 425g

They said the original prototypes were much lighter and their DH tester was happy, but they could tell the chainring was deflecting. So they made it more robust, but it’s still crazy light at just 425g with 170mm crank arms. Here’s how they got it there:

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross

The hollow carbon arms use a proprietary composite wall running through the center, a design that they’re not ready to talk about in great detail. But it makes the arms stiffer and without adding significant weight.

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross

The ti spindles machine channels out of the area where they rest in the bottom bracket bearings. So, yes, those finned sections are the connection point to the bottom bracket.

Why? They wanted to reduce as much as possible from the outside because they actually added more material on the inside edges. The tube walls at the threaded section where the crank arms are bolted on is thicker, which required them to switch to a smaller diameter bolt, but makes them much stronger.

The ti spindles come in appropriate lengths for Road, MTB, Boost MTB and Fat Bike, tapered to fit SRAM’s GXP 24mm/22mm standard. What’s unique about their set up is that they’re actually offering a Boost spaced spindle that pushes the drive side out 3mm. So, it’ll increase the Q-factor rather than simply using an offset chainring to adjust chainline.

They’ll retail for about $/€500, look for the first batch to start shipping in October. Aluminum arms will also be available, which are 160g heavier for the pair, but will be a lot cheaper. The system is so modular and easy to swap parts around that you could use the alloy arms for training and carbon for racing. Or just get one set of carbon arms and move them from bike to bike, varying the rings and spindles as necessary.

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross

Carbon fiber spiders will come, too. They’re still part of the X-Mod system, so they mount directly to the spindle, then you can swap rings in as needed. Available in 4-arm for MTB and 4 and 5-arm for road. Both are standard BCDs, not need to create something proprietary when existing standards work just fine.

Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross Miranda XMOD carbon titanium ultra lightweight crankset with modular design that works for road bikes mountain bikes gravel bikes and cyclocross

Or just get their one-piece double chainring, available in multiple tooth combos. And they’ll have more, as well as 1x options sized for cyclocross.

Miranda Chainflow 3D narrow wide chainring teeth for mountain bikes that wont drop chains

For now, their 1x chainrings are limited to 32/34/36 tooth counts. They use a new tooth profile called Chainflow 3D, which is a mix of their old version and new ideas. They say it’s the only chainring that guides the chain in three axes.

Miranda Chainflow 3D narrow wide chainring teeth for mountain bikes that wont drop chains

Chainflow 3D uses a deep valley between teeth, which is shaped to capture the chain’s pin and pull it forward. Every other tooth has a wide front-facing section, creating a T-shaped tooth, which mimics the chain retention of a narrow-wide tooth profile, but offers a much more open design to shed mud. That big, flat face also improves durability, reducing wear on the teeth.

So, circling back to weight. Miranda says they will likely machine a hole through the 1x chainrings where the recess sits (look at the Chainflow 3D logo two photos up, that’s the spot), and make other small nips and tucks. All in an effort to shave every gram possible without hurting performance.

MirandaBikeParts.com

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Tsuful
Tsuful
5 years ago

hey, 3g difference !
comment image

Matt
Matt
5 years ago

Love to see a comparison post between, this, Clavicula, Raceface, SRAM, Shimano, etc. Apples to apples. Prices, performance, weights. New tech is cool. Keep the news coming. 🙂

Caveman
Caveman
5 years ago
Reply to  Matt

Link?

gatouille
gatouille
5 years ago
Reply to  Matt

Miranda X-Mod (170mm crank, ?mm spindle, 32T DM Spider, bolt, without spindle spacer or washer) = 425g
RaceFace Next SL G4 (170mm crank, 134mm spindle, 32T DM Spider, bolt, lockring, without spacer) = 430g
Cannondale SISL2 (175mm crank, 170mm QF, 32T DM Spider, bolt, lockring, without spindle spacer or washer) = 421g
Clavicula M3 (175mm crank, 168mm QF, 32T chainring with spider with nut, bolt, lockring, without spindle spacer or washer) = 434g
SRAM XX1 (175mm crank, 168mm QF, 32T DM spider, bolt, lockring, without spindle spacer or washer) = 493g
Shimano XTR (175mm crank, 158mm QF, 32T chainring with spider with nut, without spindle spacer or washer) = 546g

Weight can be different for a same crankset.

ascarlarkinyar
5 years ago

Please spellcheck and correct errors.

Smale Rider
Smale Rider
5 years ago

Whole lot of flufff with exactly zero details other than 3 1x mountain rings. To be worth buying you need to provide something different than the current. I.E. greater variety of crank length on the extreme ends (160,155,180’s) or sub compact gearing. This is already been done by other manufacturers, and it’s been dubious to its success to this point, due to lack of actual differentiation from standard crank sets.

bob 88
bob 88
5 years ago

Is this new?

“deep valley between teeth, which is shaped to capture the chain’s pin and pull it forward”

satanas
satanas
5 years ago

Very little actual data – more numbers please! Which “standard” BCDs are the various spiders using? (There are many.) And what crank lengths are going to be available? Subcompact road spiders?

greg
greg
5 years ago

in general, the surface in which the bearing sits should be smooth and uniform. the balls will feel it, and it will affect bearing life.
also not keen on the unsupported spiders. a couple companies have tried that, with poor results.

ZeGerman
ZeGerman
5 years ago

Miranda because we knew you always wanted those cranks with the name of the female lead character from Sex and the City

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