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First Impressions & Actual Weights: Recon’s 161g Titanium 11-Speed Road Cassette

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Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

After testing the 120g alloy Recon race day cassette, we sent the link to Fair Wheel Bikes, not quite sure how they’d take it. After all, I snapped more than one tooth off that one and relegated it to use on the trainer. Fortunately, they appreciated the honesty and said it sounded about right, then offered up the more durable titanium version for review.

And here we are. Also made by Recon, the 6AL/4V titanium model uses two 3-cog clusters on the big end of the cassette -the largest of which sits on an alloy carrier- followed by individual cogs and spacer rings for the remainder. The 11-tooth cog is made from steel. It’s available in silver and gold, and the price is a whopping $320.

Here’s how that compares to SRAM, Shimano and Campy…

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

The 11-27 size comes in at 161g on our scale, which is exactly what FWB lists on their site (Fair Wheel Bikes is the U.S. importer and a reseller and provided the unit for review).

Our Shimano 11-28 DA9000 cassette came in at 192g, and it uses titanium for the five largest cogs. A SRAM Red 11-speed 11-26 cassette comes in at just 150g, though. Competitive Cyclist lists the weight for the Campagnolo Super Record 11-25 at 185g. MSRP for each of those cassettes sits around $350, $360 and $500 respectively, so only two are close on price, and only SRAM beats the weight.

Durability is the big question, which will come only after we’ve logged a lot of miles on it. For now, we offer install notes and detail photos:

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

Here’s what you get in the box, plus a thin spacer for the backside of the cassette. The two smallest cogs have ridges built into them to push them far enough off the adjacent cogs, the others rely on the four spacer rings to sit between them.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

Alloy spiders and large pins keep the two clusters together. Full range is 11/12/13/14/15/16/17/19/21/24/27.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

The teeth are ramped and shaped much like what you’d find on other brands’ offerings.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

Weight’s carved out wherever it can be.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

When it came time to install it, I had planned on using the Easton EA90 SLX wheels I’d reviewed previously. They rode well, they were black and they would look good on the new Ritte Ace we just received. Unfortunately, the massive hub shell and spoke flange used to make space for the pawl system interferes with the rivets on the cassette. So, actually, it’s unfortunate that the cassette uses such ungainly pins and rivets instead of a more flush design like Dura-Ace. At any rate, the cassette would not slide far enough onto this wheelset to fit the 11t cog, so I pulled out the ol’ Dura-Ace wheels:

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

Also road tubeless out of the box, the Dura-Ace wheels have proved plenty durable, so the Recon cassette joined a SRAM Red 22 group with Shimano wheels in unholy matrimony. I had to use an additional thin spacer identical to the one that came with the cassette (two total on this install) to get the cassette tight enough on the freehub body. With one or no spacers, it was way too loose. So, if you don’t have those laying around, ask for one when ordering the cassette just to be safe.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

Once installed, the blingy gold cassette really pops off a matte black bike.

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

My first rides on the Recon ti cassette are promising. Shifting is smoother than it was on the alloy model, and it’s exceptionally quiet. Granted it’s on a brand new bike with brand new drivetrain, but even the shifting in the workstand during setup was remarkably quick, smooth and hushed. Pretty impressive. Now we just gotta see how she holds up!

Recon-Harry.com.tw and FairWheelBikes.com

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John
John
8 years ago

I have my fair share of issues with the alloy cassettes made by Recon, KCNC, or Prolite. Even when new with new chains, I couldn’t get the cassettes not to skip. No amount of rear derailleur adjustment would bring the cassette into usable duty, so I eventually sold all of them on ebay. I did fracture a tooth on the Prolite cassette on one of the middle cogs, but other than shifting issues, I couldn’t get one of these alloy cassette to work. I went with a SRAM Powerdome and all of my issue were resolved. The SRAM was light, has great wear resistance, and shifts awesome. I’ve never looked back after that.

Alan
Alan
8 years ago

I love golddddd

Jack
Jack
8 years ago

It went on toit.

muf
muf
8 years ago

Its pretty!

That said, not sure how much of a deal it is vs the lighter red22 cassette which is basically 2 pieces (11t cog + “unibody” everything else – so you can replace the 11t when it wears out).

The red22 cassette shifting is as smooth and quiet as it gets…pretty awesome cassette in my book. but well, true, its not gold 🙂

anonymous
anonymous
8 years ago

Red is made from steel too, isn’t it? That means it will probably last longer.

Loose vs carried cogs is not a big deal if you can’t get replacements and aren’t making custom cassettes.

But it’s gold.

Duane
Duane
8 years ago

Nice pictures and all, but non-reviews like this are sort of a drag. Why not just leave it on the bike for a few months and report back after several thousand kilometers of real world experience?

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
8 years ago

I may be sounding like a broken record but other than bling and weight weenie bragging rights, what does this give you? From what I’ve seen shift quality is often poorer than stock, durability is worse than stock and weight saved is approximately half a Clif bar.

Reformed Roadie
Reformed Roadie
8 years ago

Dammit Alan…that is exactly what I was going to post…

Steve
Steve
8 years ago

You state that it “uses two 3-cog clusters”

From what I can see, it uses a 3-cog and a 2-cog cluster

Limba
Limba
8 years ago

I have no idea how these guys are still in business. I have never read a positive review from anyone that has used their cassettes for more than a few weeks.
Ride it until the chain needs to be changed and see what happens when you put a new chain on. I predict disaster.

Shanghaied
Shanghaied
8 years ago

@Limba, agreed, the few reviews I have seen of this all agree that these wear faster than hard cheese. All for a handful of grams.

Peter McMahon
Peter McMahon
8 years ago

After having worn out a couple Sram Red cassettes I’ve switched over to Ultegras. The weight difference, when all things are said and done, pretty minamal. I could stand stand to loose a pound or two, which would gain me more then a super light cassette. The Ultegra is such a much better value and works awesome. I had no issues with the Red cassettes, but just having a hard time justifying the costs.

M hard ride
M hard ride
8 years ago

This is the thing… Is machined TI even appropriate with cogs … I know 2 of the big 3 uses some Ti for their cogs… But it’s forged Ti… I think for all the rubbing and friction is not good for Ti- steel is better… SRAM had the right approach but those are too noisy…I have settled with ultegra

Guy
Guy
8 years ago

(deleted)

Citzen
Citzen
7 years ago

Dont buy cassettes from John on ebay. He sells knowingly bad cassettes to good people. Jeez John, good looking out bro.

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