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Found: Galfer Brake Pads, Rotors Bring Spanish Moto Tech to Mountain Bikes

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galfer wave disc brake rotor for mountain bikes

Galfer is a Spanish company that’s been making brake pads since 1947, mostly for automotive and moto. Along the way, they branched into bicycle parts, where they’re better known in Europe with plenty of OEM placement. Now, they’re starting to make a name for themselves stateside.

Their Disc Wave rotors are made of a high carbon steel that’s laser cut and double circular ground. Visually, they look similar to Ashima’s featherweight rotors, but the thicker stalks and slightly smaller holes suggest there’s more material here to help capture and dissipate the heat, and they do claim heat management is excellent. The weights back that up, with them coming in 20g to 30g heavier than a comparably sized Ashima rotor…but they’re by no means heavy. The 160mm Galfer Wave rotor comes in at a claimed 99g, which is 14g lighter than the new SRAM Centerline rotors. So, they’re on the lighter side of normal, which makes them a good option for road and cyclocross, too.

The wave pattern is a patented design they created in the 90’s and refers to the outer edges’ wave-like pattern. They say it helps the rotor stay cleaner and cooler. They’re all made in Spain in Galfer’s own factory, too. They’re 1.8mm thick, and they say they remain quiet and vibration free, work great in dry and wet and have a corrosion resistant finish. The best part? Retail is just $30 to $35!

Now for the pads…

galfer-brake-pads-for-hope-avid-sram-shimano-magura

They’re offered in a wide range of sizes and options to fit brake calipers dating quite a ways back up to the latest and greatest. Brands covered include SRAM/Avid, Shimano, Hope, Magura, Hayes and Formula. Given that range and the fact that they’ve been making millions of brake pads for many years but not selling them aftermarket under their own brand, you can guess where those pads were going. There’s a chance you’re running them and don’t even know it.

galfer-disc-brake-pad-performance-comparison

Three different pad compounds are offered: Standard (black), Advanced (red) and Pro (green). The Standard models are intended for XC/Enduro use in normal conditions. The Advanced models are for any type of riding and geared a little more for foul weather conditions and more extreme conditions. The Pro models are for higher intensity braking applications (DH, aggressive enduro) and have more power at the end of the lever stroke, but aren’t quite as durable. All are formulated to run quiet and extend the life of the rotor. Here’s a little video showing how they stack up under prolonged use.

Assuming everything’s equal, it’s impressive how much cooler they kept the rotor and that they could still stop the wheel. For the U.S. market, they’re only brining the Standard (semi-metallic) and Pro (proprietary Kevlar-based material) pads to the warehouse. Retail is $15.95 and $29.95 respectively, so far available through BTI and JensonUSA and a few other smaller outlets.

galfer disc brake pads 60 count shop box

For shops or teams, they make 60-count packs of the brake pads. You can get all 60 of the same thing, or a few combos of 20 each of three popular models. Check ’em out at Galfer.eu or GalferUSA.com.

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Terry
Terry
8 years ago

will they have 203 rotors?

Ben Cooper
Ben Cooper
8 years ago

They seem to have made them backwards, though, assuming the writing is meant to face outwards.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
8 years ago

Galfer has a good reputation for motorcycle brakes so I’d certainly take a look. Also the bulk packs look like an interesting option of you are using a large number of the same part and don’t need individual packaging. If the numbers work out, bulk pack pads could be a good way for an LBS to offer a competitively priced pad since the could just sell them over the counter in a baggie or as shop installed parts for a better margin.

Champs
Champs
8 years ago

If Galfer is the OE for TruckerCo, I’d get on that. Compared to Shimano, they don’t stop quite as well, but they cost a ton less, and the “extreme” pads wear like metallics but feel like organics.

LateSleeper
LateSleeper
8 years ago

It makes no sense that one pad formulation would heat the rotor less than another pad when stopping the same rider & bike from the same speed in the same distance. Brakes convert kinetic energy into thermal energy, the majority of which is dissipated in the rotor. The fact that one rotor stayed cooler in the video indicates that those pads had less friction and would require a longer stopping distance in actual use.

The Observer
The Observer
8 years ago

LateSleeper, are you serious? Do you really think all materials have the same friction coefficient and physical properties?

Go to sleep…

greg
greg
8 years ago

@The Observer,
LateSleeper is right. friction coefficient just changes how hard you are squeezing the lever. if the test is based on a fixed braking load at the hub (and not a fixed brake lever squeeze), then it’s the same heat energy created. if all but the pads are equal, that only leaves the pad material wearing off to account for the lost heat. that makes for some sizzling hot dust (not actually happening, just showing that something isnt adding up).
it’s thermodynamics, cant get around it.

Adam
Adam
8 years ago

So, which would be a more metallic type compound (for cyclocross application). The DH pad states it’s for high temperature, but doesn’t last as long… The issue with CX was/is with resin pads on occasion. Resulting in a preference toward metallic pads… I didn’t see a listing on there of pad compound

multivitz
8 years ago

Car brake pad manufacturers have sorted there brake pads out to work from cold and not fade, when are the cyclist going to get theirs sorted? OMP do a carbon range which is fantastic by all accounts and EBC have improved loads with the yellow stuff!

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