The all-new Fox 32TC gravel suspension fork is now the lightest gravel suspension fork with a telescoping design, thanks to a complete re-think of their step-cast layout, a reverse arch, and minimalist design.

The original Fox AX gravel suspension fork was little more than a rebadged, shortened 32 Step Cast mountain bike fork. It worked, but was overbuilt for the task at hand, and thus heavier than it needed to be. And the broad crown presented clearance issues for some frames. Fox knew they could do better, and the new 32TC is the result.

fox 32tc lightweight gravel suspension fork being ridden toward camera

The 32 Taper Cast comes in three levels -Factory, Performance Elite, and Performance- and they all share the new lightweight chassis with the arch on the back.

If we’re going by claimed weights at launch, the 1,226g 32 TC is one gram lighter than the 1,227g Rockshox Rudy fork launched last August. Marginal gains, indeed. And both claims are with trimmed steerer tubes, so your results may vary.

To save weight, Fox gave it a shorter air spring that delivers the desired spring curve. Where the old 32 SC could take up to seven volume reduction spacers (and benefited from using them), the new 32 TC fits a maximum of four, and Fox says you may not even need to use any.

It comes only with a 1.5″ tapered steerer tube, which they say makes it compatible with the vast majority of bikes out there, with a focus on modern frames that are all using that standard.

Sticking with 12x100mm thru axles kept it narrow, and the knobs and switches on the top are smaller, lower-profile versions than what’s on their MTB forks. Combined, these help it clear most frames’ downtubes.

closeup details of fox 32tc gravel bike suspension fork

More weight savings come from a chiseled lower that tapers (hence the “TC” Taper Cast moniker versus “SC” Step Cast from before). Note the bulge for the bushings mid-leg and you get a sense of how lean they’ve made it.

Fox says these cutouts won’t become clogged with mud, and it’s why they’ve put the trusses and cutouts on the front of the reverse arch…so that they’re aimed away from the direction of flying mud. Unless you’re riding backward.

The arch is reversed because it allows them to place it lower and further reduce material…and it looks much sleeker from the front, more appropriate for a drop bar bike.

Fender mounts at the bottom and on the arch allow a full fender to be mounted, and mounting tabs are included with each fork.

2022 Fox 32TC Specs

rider descending on the new fox 32tc gravel suspension fork

Shared specs across all three trim levels are:

  • 40mm and 50mm travel options
  • Axle to Crown: 435.5mm (40mm) and 445.5mm (50mm)
  • 45mm and 50mm rake options
  • FIT4 and GRIP damper options
  • 700c chassis (not 650B compatible*)
  • 700x50mm tire max clearance (45mm max with fender installed)
  • Lower leg air/oil bypass channels
  • 1-1/8″ to 1.5″ tapered steerer
  • Flat mount brakes – 160mm/180mm rotor compatible

*Why isn’t the Fox 32TC fork 650B compatible? Because those bushing-and-seal bulges at the top of the lowers just so happen to be right where a 650B tire’s widest point would be, which limits tire clearance to just 30mm. And we all know that’s not enough.

Fox 32TC Factory

fox 32tc factory gravel suspension fork shown from all angles

The 32TC Factory forks get Kashima coated stanchions and their FIT4 dampers, offering external low speed compression damping adjustments in Open mode, plus the usual three-position Open-Medium-Firm switch that stops short of being a full lockout. The rebound knob on all models is recessed inside the lowers. Choose from gloss orange or gloss black on this model.

Fox 32 TC Performance Elite

fox 32tc performance elite gravel suspension fork shown from all angles

The Performance Elite model keeps the FIT4 damper, but switches to their black anodized coating on the stanchions. All models use the same Kabolt-X bolt-on thru axle. If you like the stealth matte-black color, go for this one or the…

Fox 32TC Performance

The 32TC Performance fork gets Fox’s three-position adjustable GRIP damper, which gives you micro adjusts between indents.

Pricing for the forks ranges from $769 to $949 USD ($1,039 to $1,279 CAD / 1259€ to 1039€)

Video Hype

Above, the sizzle reel. Below, Geoff Kabush takes it for a spin and compares it back to back with a rigid fork.

All models are available now. Stay tuned, we’ve been riding one for a while and will report back after the bonanza of Sea Otter Classic this week…

RideFox.com

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16 Comments
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alloycowboy
alloycowboy
2 months ago

Fox really needs to come out with a single sided fork as aerodynamics matter on a gravel bike.

Dan B
Dan B
2 months ago

reminds me of the pre Bomber Marzocci days!

Bill Bartzen
Bill Bartzen
2 months ago

Great looking, except for the open back mud collector. Will need to cover that up with some tape.

Kyle
Kyle
2 months ago
Reply to  Bill Bartzen

did you read or look at the photos of the fork on the bike? It’s a backwards fork bridge, so it’s not opened back???

Www
Www
2 months ago
Reply to  Kyle

I think he’s referring to the back of the legs being open.

Saabinski
Saabinski
2 months ago

Rudy Ultimate looks better and IMOP the specs are better too.

Patrick
Patrick
2 months ago

The axle to crown length seems really long. Even a Lauf fork is only 417 mm without sag accounted for. What bikes are these things intended for with such long axle to be crown lengths?

Drew
Drew
2 months ago
Reply to  Patrick

Keep in mind, that length is usually with the fork fully extended. Subtract 40 or 50mm for a bottomed out fork. The Lauf doesn’t have to deal with the bridge hitting the downtube, so it can have a little shorter length to the axle. It only has to worry about the tire hitting the downtube.

I’m going to assume most people would run this at 10~20% sag, so fork to crown will be probably somewhere between 4~10mm lower when riding.

Patrick
Patrick
2 months ago
Reply to  Drew

You don’t ride with the fork bottomed out though. In 99% of riding the fork is going to be 20-30 mm too long on just about any current gravel bike. 395-405 is normal and these are 436 and 445 before 5-10 mm of sag.

Alex
Alex
2 months ago
Reply to  Patrick

435 is exactly the same as a 40mm RS Rudy

Patrick
Patrick
2 months ago
Reply to  Alex

I know. How many gravel bikes are designed to have a fork that long? Go add 30 or 40 mm in fork length to your gravel bike and see how it rides.

Shafty
Shafty
2 months ago
Reply to  Patrick

New products are generally designed for new *complete* bikes. Not often for existing ones. Don’t underestimate the influence of OEMs. In that context, the bike would be designed to accommodate the length.

Your comparison to the Lauf is poorly chosen. That fork has less available travel and no adjustability or damping to speak of. Sure, the crown height is lower, due to the lack of any sliding elements, so it is a more efficient structure. The Lauf also generally costs more than the top end Fox, at ~$1000, when it’s available. Currently, their website is closed pending a presumed new look and/or marketing campaign, so not exactly clear.

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
2 months ago

awesome we now have down gravel

Mr. P
2 months ago

This is a great solution for “bigger” gravel terrain (embedded rocks in roads). I prefer this to a stem-based suspension.

J.F.
J.F.
2 months ago

Can anyone name the brand/model of the blue bike in the pictures?

eddiepliers
2 months ago
Reply to  J.F.

J.F., it’s a Devinci Hatchet