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FSA adds more, wider modular crank spindles, plus Gradient & 2x Powerbox options

2018 FSA Gradient alloy enduro freeride mountain bike crankset with modular spindle design to fit any frame
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Full Speed Ahead has put the finishing touches on their modular crankarm, chainring and spindle system with the new Gradient alloy and MTB PowerBox Carbon 2x cranksets. Now, their lineup offers options across the price range, letting you mix and match to fit your bike and your budget. Or easily move your high end carbon cranks to a new ride, whether it’s a road, gravel, cyclocross or mountain bike.

2018 FSA PowerBox carbon XC Trail mountain bike crankset with powermeter spider

While a 2x option was shown when FSA first announced their partnership with Power2Max to create the PowerBox power meter cranksets, it hadn’t been available yet. Now it is, with the MTB PowerBox Carbon 2x offering a 36/24 double chainring set for anyone still wanting to run a 2x group.

FSA PowerBox 1x powermeter mountain bike crankset

The original mountain bike PowerBox crankset came only with a bolt-on 1x single chainring. Now you’ve got options.

2018 FSA PowerBox carbon XC Trail mountain bike crankset with powermeter spider now available with 2x double chainrings

Technically speaking, you could mount a PowerBox-equipped crankarm unit to any of their modular spindles. UPDATE: But, it won’t work with any of their crank arms as originally stated, here’s why:

The spline interface between the spider and crankset on non-powermeter cranks uses a 12-spline design with a smooth round section on the back half. The powermeter-equipped PowerBox cranksets use a 16-tooth interface to add more connection points for better data.

Because of this, they don’t sell the PowerBox spider unit as a standalone part – you can only buy it pre-attached to carbon mountain bike cranks, or on carbon or alloy road cranks starting at $649. Upgrades let you enhance the system’s capabilities in an a la carte fashion. The chainline offset differs between the road and mountain bike models, so while you could technically transfer between those, shifting quality may be compromised.

FSA’s modular design (top, orange) let you swap crankarms, spindles and chainrings. The old design (bottom) bonded the driveside crankarm to the spindle.

For regular mountain bikes, the modular system has multiple spacers and chainring offsets to give you 50mm, 53mm, and 56mm chain lines (equivalent to standard, Boost and “Super Boost”). Some bikes and cranksets measure standard and Boost at 49mm and 52mm, respectively, so FSA’s may push things 1mm further outboard.

Some frame manufacturers had been asking for more crankarm clearance, so rather than design an entirely new set of crankarms, FSA made a 6mm longer spindle that’ll ship with 3mm spacers for each side. That moves the crankarms outward by 3mm on each side, and then you simply put a spacer between the frame and the arm or chainring. This eliminates the 50mm chainline option, but it’s typically only an issue when you have wider frames and chainstays on Boost-spaced bikes.

They’ve also added an extra wide spindle to fit BB83 frames. Those bikes use a threaded 83mm wide bottom bracket shell that’s designed for threaded bottom brackets with external bearing cups, so the spindle has to be very wide. This isn’t a common standard, mostly found on gravity bikes, but now there’s a spindle for that. That brings the total to five spindle width options for their modular platform.

FullSpeedAhead.com

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Maus Haus
Maus Haus
6 years ago

The MTB power meter is a double ring. Not many of those out there anymore. Also FSA is probably the worst for MTB chainring shifting to encounter chain suck when I used to run doubles. Gave up after destroying many chains and scratching my frame with FSA doubles back in the day. It’s hard to trust FSA with so many issues in the past. Their warranty dept are some of the surliest people in the industry. Maybe for an OEM FSA would makes sense for road bikes but they have no marketing for MTB. Why would anyone buy FSA for MTB as an OE? Maybe FSA should buy Ritchey or some other MTB component brand to coexist with the FSA road marketing.

Mike Martin
Mike Martin
6 years ago
Reply to  Maus Haus

Are you serious? FSA have enhanced my racing significantly. I think they are well made, high quality, scientifically validated products to ensure I am at my best on race day. I think that products chosen by a world champion like Julien Absalon and other pros riders are a warranty.

TYler durden
TYler durden
6 years ago

so modular that cannondale and race face crank arms fit the spindles!

yes FSA quality suuuucks. cant think of a worse bike company really. italianese.

neil
neil
6 years ago
Reply to  TYler durden

theres a reason for that….

they make all those cranks!

TheKaiser
6 years ago
Reply to  neil

If that is true, then it is funny that FSA stuff seems to have such a reputation for unreliability, whereas the cranks they produce for RF and Cdale seem to function as they should. I guess if RF and Cdale design them themselves, and do a 2nd round of QC that would help out a lot, but it’s still funny to see that quality product can come off their production lines, given the right conditions.

Joe Dalton
Joe Dalton
6 years ago
Reply to  TYler durden

FSA MTB SUCKS??? That sounds strange! International teams and high-level bikes constructors (Bianchi, Trek, Kross, Focus) choose FSA products of their races…with great results. Are they masochists? I don’t believe!

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