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Fly Uphill on 963g Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc Road Wheelset with Carbon Spokes & Rim

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, Andrew Feather climbing
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When the British Hill Climb season gets underway, the weight weenies come out hunting grams to shed, and Hunt’s new sub-1kg ultralight Hill Climb SL Disc carbon tubulars might just be the perfect wheelset. Sure, we’ve all learned by now that aero is everything, and road tubeless offers the lowest rolling-resistance. But when you are just time trialing uphill, lightweight is king. And in this case, it’s hard to argue with the allure of a 963g disc brake road wheelset that weighs as little as 963g complete…

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc carbon tubular road bike wheelset

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, Andrew Feather climbing
all c. Hunt

Hunt built a name for themselves with affordable, versatile, and aerodynamic wheels – for everything from adventure riding to pro racing. But the Hunt crew are also British bike nerds too. Not to mention, one of their sponsored riders – Andrew Feather – is the 2022 British Hill Climb National Champion.

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, The Struggle is real

So, ahead of the 2023 British Hill Climb season, they went back to revisit their rim brake Hill Climb SL wheels from five years ago. And surprisingly, they’ve managed to shed grams.

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, dark pair

Hunt made the new tubular Hill Climb SL Disc wheels lighter, while upgrading to modern disc brake & thru-axles standards.

For when the absolute lightest weight and ultra-efficient climbing accelerations are what really matters!

What’s new?

The new Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc wheels still feature a tubular carbon rim. So, you’re going to have to glue up the lightest tubs you can find.

The new carbon rims are still 30mm deep. But they grow to 26mm wide outside. That matches anything from tiny 23mm tubs up to more modern 28mm tire widths for lower rolling resistance.

Tech details

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, drilled out hub, UD carbon spokes

What’s also new is a switch to serviceable / true-able carbon spokes. The new disc brake Hill Climb SL wheels feature Hunt’s TaperLock UD carbon spokes. There’s 18 up front & 20 in the back. Those aero, light, stiff & strong UD carbon spokes are laced to a minimalist 6066-T6 CNC’d alloy UD SL centerlock hubset with Hunt’s first ratchet internals. A 40-tooth ratchet ring means quick 9° engagement. And a literally drilled-out alloy axle and Shimano freehub body shave even more grams without compromising strength (apparently.)

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, 963g actual weight

The result is a claimed wheelset weight of just 963g (426g front & 537g rear).

Just for comparison, that’s 469g or 1/3 lighter than Hunt’s existing 30 Carbon CX Disc tubular cyclocross wheels that are the same depth and 1mm narrower!

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc – Pricing, options & availability

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset

These all-new Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc wheels with carbon spokes, carbon rims & ratchet hubs are available to pre-order today for £1299 / $1699 / 1699€. You can also get a SRAM XD/XDR, Campagnolo, or Campy N3W freehub if needed.

Order a set now, and Hunt says they will deliver them from the second week of September.

Hunt Hill Climb SL Disc ultralight carbon tubular road bike wheelset, pair climbing

The UK’s cycling Hill Climb season is already in full swing in this second half of August. But that key national championship isn’t ’til the end of October, giving plenty of time to benefit from a new ultralight set of wheels. Plus, once the racing’s officially done, you’ll have plenty of time to hunt KOMs on all your local climbs with this sub-1000g wheelset.

HuntBikeWheels.com

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28 Comments
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Randal Bladel
Randal Bladel
9 months ago

No way will I ever use carbon spokes. A disaster waiting to happen. And Hunt has problems with poor quality hubs. Not worth the risks.

Robin
Robin
9 months ago
Reply to  Randal Bladel

So how are carbon fiber spokes a “disaster waiting to happen?” You do know, don’t you that CF is very strong in tension, right, and that these spokes will never be in compression, right? Please, provide evidence to support the claim. Note that opinion is not evidence. Use physics or engineering (applied physics), please. Also, note that suspicion and doubt are not evidence either.

ryan
ryan
9 months ago
Reply to  Robin

fine ill play along….carbon fiber has a much higher modulus of elasticity than steel. so simple things like thermal effects or even minimal creep can cause them to lose tension.

K.M.
K.M.
9 months ago
Reply to  Robin

Your’re not following your own advice, so why should he?

Robin
Robin
9 months ago
Reply to  K.M.

I didn’t make the extraordinary claim. Randal did. The burden of proof is on him. I’m asking upon what is his conclusion based.

But since you asked,

Concrete and ceramics typically have much higher compressive strengths than tensile strengths. Composite materials, such as glass fiber epoxy matrix composite, tend to have higher tensile strengths than compressive strengths. Metals are difficult to test to failure in tension vs compression. In compression, metals fail from buckling/crumbling/45° shear which is much different (though higher stresses) than tension which fails from defects or necking down.”

Notice the bit about composites?

“If the ratio of the length to the effective radius of the material loaded in compression (Slenderness ratio) is too high, it is likely that the material will fail under buckling. Otherwise, if the material is ductile yielding usually occurs which displays the barreling effect…”

The slenderness ratio for spokes is very high, and that means spokes tend to be loaded in tension so that they are always in tension, even at the point of highest loads. This is why wheels are built such that spokes always have tension, If a compressive load exceeds the spoke tension, then that tends to result in either other spokes breaking (as their tensions go way up) or rim damage.

Robin
Robin
9 months ago
Reply to  K.M.

It’s worth mentioning that Lew Composites designed their VT-1 CF aero wheels so that with no load, the CF spokes were under no tension (and no compression. However, they had a big problem: it didn’t take a huge load to cause a big lateral deflection of the rim. On a ride one day, I hit a smallish pothole at a relatively low speed. The resulting impulse and the accompanying compressive load caused massive lateral defection at the bottom of the wheel and thus my RD was torn off by some spokes. Since there was no base tension in the spokes, there was nothing to counter the compressive load…because spokes aren’t designed to handle compressive loads.

Pete
Pete
9 months ago

I have a pair of 663g wheels I built, 24/20 spoke, on a bike ridden regularly, no issues.
Why must some people insist that just under a kg is arguably the lightest in the world?
PLS

Craig
Craig
9 months ago
Reply to  Pete

Out of interest what are the hubs,spokes,rims, that you used? That’s incredibly light.

Pete
Pete
9 months ago
Reply to  Craig

If you search WeightWeenies you might find a thread. Don’t want to jack this article (too much).

Mike
Mike
9 months ago
Reply to  Pete

The lightest 29″/700c rims are around 250g each, that leaves You 163g for both hubs and 44 spokes. Berd, or PI Rope dyneema spokes weight 2,2-2,5g, so those add another 100g.

63g set of hubs? I smell huge BS…

Last edited 9 months ago by Mike
TiagoSilva
TiagoSilva
9 months ago
Reply to  Mike
blablabla
blablabla
9 months ago
Reply to  TiagoSilva

Ok, I stand corrected. Don’t know if I would ride them outside hill climbing races though – safety first. 🙂

Pete
Pete
9 months ago
Reply to  Mike

There are rims out there UNDER 200g.
Stock Extralite rim hubs are 177g.

Will
Will
9 months ago
Reply to  Pete

It’s ok, we’re all curious enough. Link?

Pete
Pete
9 months ago
Reply to  Will

go to weightweenies.com and use the search function.
This is an article about Hunt wheels so you’ll have to do your own homework.

Pete
Pete
9 months ago
Reply to  Pete
Seraph
Seraph
9 months ago
Reply to  Pete

Maybe you mean 1663g? I have what I consider pretty lightweight wheels on my gravel bike, using contemporary components. 28h 240S CL SP hubs on Nextie Ultralight 29″ hookless rims with Aerolites and alloy Squorx nips, comes to 1150g. I could probably get to sub-1000g easily with some Extralite hubs and a lower spoke count, or Berd spokes. Not sure I could realistically reach sub-700g while still retaining any ride quality.

E x
E x
9 months ago

Price is actually not terrible
But I wouldn’t take a chance in their first gen hub and spoke solutions. Go with extralite 327c and gain not only the benefit of clinchers (lighter, less hassle) but lighter weight and more reliability.

Gary P
Gary P
9 months ago

Why bother with tubulars for disc brake wheels, even if you’re a weight weenie? Light TPU tubes are a game changer for clinchers, making it possible to match or even beat the total system weight of a tubular setup. Example: 23c Veloflex Record Open (Clincher) + Tubolito S-Road tube = ~158 grams. A 23c Veloflex Record Tubular is ~195 grams before glue, of which you probably need +/- 15 grams per wheel. So that leaves you ~50 grams of mass per rim to add bead hooks and still come in at the same total system weight.

K.M.
K.M.
9 months ago
Reply to  Gary P

At least the TPU inner tubes made by Tubolito and Revoloop are crap. Tried several ones, and all failed a lot faster than the cheapest butyl one either from the valve or the seam.Compared to those, changing a tubular after thousands of km’s is a lot more tolerable.

TiagoSilva
TiagoSilva
9 months ago
Reply to  Gary P

Aren’t you forgetting the rim, the rim is much light in tubular version…

Workonsunday
Workonsunday
9 months ago

The problem is that now tubeless/clinchers are being developed faster than ever. My heart is still with tub but im struggling to find good tubs that dont puncture after just 100km. The best we got for all round riding are veloflex and challenge but both are some what behind say Gp5000s or challenge’s own Crit RS in terms of rolling resistance. At some what low speed going uphill, rolling resistance dictates how fast you go up more than 100-200grams. Challenge did venture into tubeless tubs but didnt really get any where since they arent as big as vittoria or other big brands and just dont have the push in the industry… shame really.

K.M.
K.M.
9 months ago
Reply to  Workonsunday

For example Michelin’s Power Cup is a good tubular. So are Tufo’s Elite ones, and they can even be patched like a tubeless. Heard good things about Pirelli’s. No issues with Michelin or Tufo puncturing any faster than similar type clinchers or tubeless. But yes I agree it’s getting more difficult to find good ones.

Pete
Pete
9 months ago
Reply to  Workonsunday

Props to all the tubeless setups that are just as competitive to tubular.
That wasn’t the case until recently.

Joel Ulrich
Joel Ulrich
9 months ago

Duke baccara ultra 36C with carbonspokes and extralite hubs = 930g the lightest tubular i know so far is around 700g ax-lightness with berd and extralite hubs

E x
E x
9 months ago
Reply to  Joel Ulrich

Those are probably rim brakes also (700g wheels)

Thomas
Thomas
9 months ago

I don’t get all the hype around superlight wheels, as long as the weight saving is not allocated at the rim/tire. The inertia / rotating mass reduction is the key. The spokes and specialty the weight saving on the hub itself are not really relevant imho.

Angstrom
Angstrom
9 months ago
Reply to  Thomas

These are specifically for hill climbing competitions, on gradients steep enough that static weight matters.

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