Illuminate your path with Lezyne’s Year 10 light series

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There are two big reasons to use a light while riding… to be seen, and to be able to see. Whether it’s during the day or at night, anything that can grab the attention of motorists should help keep you safe. Also, while hitting a trail or a late night commute home, it’s nice to have a light strong enough to see what’s coming. 

Going on 10 years in the accessory industry, and 5 years since their first LED light, Lezyne is celebrating in style with brighter remakes and new models…

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photo c. Lezyne

The new Super Drive 1250XXL provides an additional 50 lumens from last year’s 1200 iteration. Bundled in Constant Lumen technology keeps the light output even as the battery drains. Focusing the light is a Maximum Optical Reflection (MOR) lens that also provides 180° of visibility, and a battery light that indicates power level. The charge time is set at 6 hours, and it’s said to weigh 267 g with the strap – 258 g without, and is priced at $120.

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The 1100XL headlight features twin LED bulbs that put out a range of 150 – 1100 lumens with varying modes. It also gets Lezyne’s Constant Lumen technology, and the MOR lens. Charging is a quick 4 hours with the help of a 2 Amp micro USB charger. Both roadies and trail riders can enjoy it with an aero & standard handlebar mount. It weighs in at 155g with the mount – 146 g without, and is priced at $100.

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The remade Macro Drive 800XL adds an additional 200 lumens from its predecessor and improved run times across the board. It also receives the MOR lens, and similar to the others is constructed with a CNC’d aluminum body. Weighing 153 g with mount – 144 g without, recharges in 4 hours, and is priced at $70.

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The Micro Drive 450XL gets 50 lumens added from last year’s take, and provides enough light to comfortably commute during night. Similar to the last four lights, it features Memory Mode which saves the output option that was on when powered down. It weighs in at 100 g with the mount – 91 g without, recharges in 2 hours, and is priced at $50.

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The Hecto Drive 350XL utilizes cable free USB direct charging, and also gets a 50 lumen boost from last year. It’s visible from 180° with Side Visibility tech, and is weather resistant. There are several different output modes all with improved run time. Weighing in at 91 g with the strap – 82 g without, it has a 2 hour charging time, and a price tag of $35.

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The KTV Drive covers your front and rear visibility. Both units get cable-free USB direct charging, and water-resistant enclosures. The front puts out up to 70 lumens, while the rear offers seven lumens across the three output modes. The front is said to weigh 50g, recharges in three hours, and goes for $23. While the back weighs 47g, recharges in three hours, and costs $20. As a complete set the price is $40.

femto_duo_light  femto_duo_rear_light

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The brand new Femto Duo offers both front and back lights in one CNC’d aluminum body (one body with both lights front and back). The unit mounts to the helmet, and utilizes the lenses for both on & off buttons. Powered by four CR2032 coin batteries (included) the lights put out up to 15 lumens in front, and seven in the back. Price is set at $30.

Lezyne.com

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19 Comments
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Sevenfold (@Sevenfold1)

Gone downhill since they stopped having removable batteries. This is a must for me. I have the Powerdrive & Superdrive models – both use the same removable 18650 battery.
In Dragon’s Den speak – I’m out.

jlg
jlg
6 years ago

“180° of visibility” meaning you are blinding people 🙁

MC
MC
6 years ago
Reply to  jlg

It’s not like there’s 1250 lumens in every direction. I imagine it’s 180° of being visible to others (left to right)

jlg
jlg
6 years ago
Reply to  MC

Left to right is fine. It is the upper beam that blind pedestrians or drivers.

Nathan
Nathan
6 years ago
Reply to  jlg

The shell of the Super and Deca hang out over the front of the beam to keep it from pointing too far up.

Dr J
Dr J
6 years ago

These are great if you are crossing Sahara alone. Or if you are riding in the forest at night and want to see those owls sitting at the top of a tree. In the city however, they are less useful, unless you don’t mind blinding everyone around with your 1000 lumen beam.

I wish more companies were focused on a proper reflector design and build lights not with Death Star-like death rays but something actually usable on a bike path at night.

yard dog
yard dog
6 years ago
Reply to  Dr J

I agree. I want the light on the road not in the tree tops. There are some generator hub lights with proper reflector design but I don’t understand why battery lights can’t have this too. With a proper reflector design the light doesn’t have to be so blinding and can then have longer battery life.

Robin
Robin
6 years ago
Reply to  yard dog

I think the answer is as simple as the companies don’t want to pay for proper optical engineering. Maybe they think they can do the design on their own.

Frank
Frank
6 years ago
Reply to  Dr J

Look at the mounts. All the best optics in the world are useless if the end user insists on pointing the light to the sky. But, thankfully, the mounts also let you point them down.

ABD
ABD
6 years ago
Reply to  Dr J

If your light is shining in the tree tops, you’re pointing it in the wrong direction.

Mike D
6 years ago

That Hecto Drive headlight at 300 lumens has been one of our best sellers, mostly because of lumens-per-dollar. That said, it has a downright AWFUL reflector design, with a huge deadspot right in the middle of the beam. I’ll pay them the compliment of doing away with the charging cord and building the usb right into the light body–that’s pretty slick. For the college student on a budget, it’s a decent pick. For anyone else (who cares about actually seeing) do some research first and look at the beam patterns. You can have all the lumens in the universe but if they’re being flung about all willy-nilly, what good are they doing you.. there’s plenty of good lights to be had these days.

Robin
Robin
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike D

Lux (lumens per square meter) should be the standard by which lights are compared.

dannyammann
6 years ago

out of this group, I would get the superdrive. Not because of the overdrive setting, but because with a combination of flash and its economy setting, I can get through a whole weeks worth of commuting on a single charge. When push comes to shove, and a storm pops up like they do so often in Oklahoma, I know that my light has lots of juice to run on the enduro or blast setting to get me home safe. even at the end of the work week.

Mtb4me
Mtb4me
6 years ago

Light and Motion…best in class. Marina Ca….period!

Mike D
6 years ago
Reply to  Mtb4me

I second that! Class company, and they make solid stuff. I have 3 lights from them, nothing but good things to say about the lights.

elvis
elvis
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike D

Nice and thanks for sharing.

Antipodean_eleven
6 years ago

One brand: http://www.orfos.bike/ I’ve yet to find anything that works as well or is as effective (yes, they are a little exe.)

Jonathan
Jonathan
6 years ago

Kinda bummed to see them move away from the really nice aesthetic they previously incorporated on their lights.

Josh
Josh
6 years ago
Reply to  Jonathan

They still look better than all the other plastic junk out there.