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LightSKIN NACAROAD Aero Headlight Gains Blinky Modes (Except in Germany)

lightskin naca road aero profile bike headlight shown on a bike
9 Comments

The LightSKIN NACAROAD headlight debuted at Eurobike 2021 and I received an early production unit. I’m a fan of putting lights under out-front computer mounts, and the NACA aero profile and fantastic beam pattern make this one an interesting option for riding in the dark. But without a blinking mode, its solid beam would burn through the battery too quickly for long rides on high mode, which was what I needed for decent daytime visibility.

The reason it only had non-blinking modes? They made it for every market, which includes Germany, and Germany doesn’t allow blinking lights. But much of the rest of the world does, and those blinking patterns not only extend battery life, they help drivers notice us. So, they’ve made an “International Version” that includes two blinking modes – a 400-lumen Day Flash and a 185-lumen Night Flash.

lightskin naca road aero profile bike headlight shown from all angles

The form factor remains the same, and it keeps the four solid modes ranging from 185 to 520 lumens (30 to 90 lux) with run times from 1.5 to 7.3 hours. Blinking modes extend that to 10 to 31.7 hours. It includes a shield to keep the light from becoming a distraction to the rider, assuming your computer doesn’t block your view of it.

lightskin naca road aero profile bike headlight light profile

The light using a dual projector design to throw a wide but distinct beam pattern, mimicking what vehicle headlights do for drivers, while keeping the upper edge below eye level for oncoming traffic. MSRP is $270, claimed weight is 163g.

Lightskin.co.kr

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Def Defy
Def Defy
8 months ago

Strobing lights suck. They make it harder for drivers to judge rider speed and position. They should be banned like in Germany

Aha
Aha
8 months ago
Reply to  Def Defy

Using one on it’s own on a dark road in the country sucks, I agree. Especially annoying on audaxes. But using a small flasher as a sometimes addition to a constant light can be a smart move. They help a small light be seen amongst all the other lights in a city.

Beik Nord
Beik Nord
8 months ago
Reply to  Def Defy

I completely agree with this and would like to add they can be VERY distracting and disorienting for oncoming traffic as well – like on a cramped bike path.

Dinger
Dinger
8 months ago
Reply to  Def Defy

While I find that to be true at night (steady, flood pattern lights, too) I don’t during the day, when a flashing light is more visually diruptive and all the light is there to do is signal that you are present in the distance, often against a low-vis background.

Chris
Chris
8 months ago
Reply to  Def Defy

The challenge during the day is to wake a driver staring at their phone. Strobing seems to help.

zak
zak
8 months ago

it actually is banned in DE (§ 67 Abs. 3 und 4 StVZO)

Fake Namerton
Fake Namerton
8 months ago

Just do a pulse like Light and Motion my dudes. That works as a nice power saver that gives you useful light and doesn’t tick off everyone else within eyeshot of you.

Tom Place
Tom Place
8 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

So Outbound Lighting’s approach to this is to have two modes optimized for different ambient conditions, with the Daytime Strobe being a quick intense flash at a regular interval since driver’s eyes’ are adjusted to bright daylight and a higher intensity change is required to be noticed, then having a Nighttime Pulse mode that is similar to what you mention with a slower, smooth ramp up and down at 0.5Hz, so that there is not violent intensity change ruining dark-adapted night vision of the drivers. I totally get the arguments on the “no blinking/flashing/pulsing of any kind” arguments, but if they’re going to be used we can at least use them appropriately.

Andrew
Andrew
8 months ago

I’m using Canyon’s own Flash 800 so obviously this one is for amateurs, lol. If not tilted down by one click, the Flash 800 is borderline dangerous for drivers. Just crazy.

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