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Litespeed Spezia FI is their lightest disc brake road bike ever

2023 litespeed spezia FI fully integrated lightweight titanium road bike
17 Comments

Coming in 30g lighter than their prior lightest model, the T1SL, the new Litespeed Spezia FI road bike counts more than weight savings among its tricks.

Paired with the latest ENVE IN-route fork, stem & bar combo and Chris King’s AeroSet 3 headset and T47i bottom bracket, the FI (Fully Integrated) bike hides every wire and hose inside the frame.

closeup details of 2023 litespeed spezia FI fully integrated lightweight titanium road bike

This keeps everything out of the wind for better looks and aerodynamics, all on an 1145g frame (size medium). They claim that’s 200g lighter than any other titanium disc brake road bike on the market today.

The bike’s name and do-it-all personality come from La Spezia, a coastal Italian town that’s a frequent stop on the Giro d’Italia. With a mix of flat coastal roads, punchy climbs, and long descents, it’s got something for everyone.

closeup details of 2023 litespeed spezia FI fully integrated lightweight titanium road bike

The Spezia frame is mostly 3/2.5 tubing but with Litespeed’s proprietary sheet-formed 6/4 top tube, which adds more front end stiffness for better handling. All tubes are size specific, and the downtube gets tri-ovalized for a wider shape at the bottom bracket that creates more weld surface for a stiffer junction.

closeup details of 2023 litespeed spezia FI fully integrated lightweight titanium road bike

The seatstays are ovalized to reduce drag, and the rear brake mount is a single CNC’d part that (they say) is lighter and stiffer than traditional construction or even 3D-printed parts while offering perfect alignment.

closeup details of 2023 litespeed spezia FI fully integrated lightweight titanium road bike

It’s designed for wireless (and semi-wireless, like Di2) groups only, there’s no accommodation for standard shift cables through the frame. Designed as an all around performer, it fits up to 700×35 tires for comfort on the longest, roughest days.

litespeed spezia FI geometry chart

Complete bikes start at $8,299 (introductory price) with Ultegra Di2, with options for wheel, tire and cockpit upgrades as you build it out on their website.

Litespeed.com

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17 Comments
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nooner
nooner
1 year ago

Looks awesome! Well done Litespeed.

Velo Kitty
Velo Kitty
1 year ago

Why would they spec the frame with a threaded bottom bracket?

N2 Cycling
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

Because many of us won’t ever use a PF BB again

a-m
a-m
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

Why wouldn’t they? T47 is the best “standard” to date. Pressfit is garbage.

Dinger
Dinger
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

Right or wrong, threaded BB’s are what the market demands.They could’ve shed significant weight with PF but the same is true of rim brakes.

Passo Pordoi
Passo Pordoi
1 year ago
Reply to  Dinger

They also don’t creak like PressFit due to shell intolerances from frame to frame/brand-to-brand, so.

Velo Kitty
Velo Kitty
1 year ago
Reply to  Passo Pordoi

So they can’t machine a smooth hole properly, but somehow they can machine a threaded hole properly?

john caletti
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

they can machine them great, but welding deforms the part. As the part, such as the BB shell is made thicker (wall thickness, not diameter) it will resist the deformation better- but it would have to be very thick to work well (too thick for a light bicycle) The PF bore get’s cut again to size after welding, but you are fighting a part that is not as round as it once was and it is a light part with some flex – so it makes it difficult to work with and get to very high tolerances. A threaded interface also needs to be chased again after welding. Sadly T47 has a very fine thread pitch that is not user friendly. The thread-in BB cups are a nice buffer against dealing with imperfections due to welding so many parts together there – and I think we have enough data to say threaded BBs are easier to work with and less creak-prone. Press in bearings are good in a machined aluminum part, like a hub. Or, press the bearing into an aluminum BB cup and thread it into the frame… as we’ve been doing for 100 years successfully.

Dinger
Dinger
1 year ago
Reply to  Passo Pordoi

I’ve had several pressefit BB’s that are silent and a T47 that creaked (and seen numerous of all types behave both ways). Sometimes BB’s make noise and sometimes it’s hard to get rid of. I guess it just depends on which type of BB’s “creak” one prefers to hear.

Last edited 1 year ago by Dinger
Velo Kitty
Velo Kitty
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

How many threaded bearing interfaces are in your cars?

Brent
Brent
1 year ago
Reply to  Velo Kitty

Indeed… but unfortunately like many good technologies in the bike industry. Terrible execution convinced the market to go back to options that are engineering nonsense.

chris
chris
1 year ago

Get rid of that chunky chris king headset. Gross.

Tumadre
Tumadre
1 year ago

Top headset and upward seems like a fancy designer kitchen tap connected to a crusty pipe coming from a hole in the wall

MMM
MMM
1 year ago

Wouldn’t the seatstays that have cross section of an chamfered square induce less drag and create less turbulence behind them then the seatstays with oval cross section?

MagnanimousWaffle
MagnanimousWaffle
1 year ago

Dang, T47 only — get with the times Litespeed!!

For anyone complaining about pressfit making noise — how are the bearings installed on your threaded cups??? they are pressed.

That means all bottom brackets are pressfit, read that again.

The benefit of a well designed one piece press fit bottom bracket – is perfect bearing alignment. this is impossible to achieve with a traditional threaded BB, but easy for a one piece pressfit BB.

john caletti
1 year ago

NOT “easy” in a lightweight welded structure

Oliver
Oliver
11 months ago

Lightest bike with discs ever. How do come to that conclusion, with only the weight of the frame???

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