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Los Angeles’s swrve Apparel to Close its Operations

swrve Apperal Closes its Doors Muriel and MattMuriel and Matt from swrve (Photo/swerve)
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Sad news out of Los Angeles today. The small, high-qulaity outdoor apparel company swrve is announcing that it is closing operations. swrve is known for its durable, wearable outdoor/workwear apparel. I’ve been a fan and occasional customer for some time, and I’m sad to see them go.

Some Words From the swrve

General Manager and Co-Founder, Muriel Bartol says, “We love swrve and we’re incredibly grateful to our customers for having supported this venture for the last 20 years.” She continues, “It afforded us a life focused on making thoughtful garments of the highest quality, in a way that made us proud of the work we did.”

We started swrve with a single product,” added lead designer and the other co-founder Matt Rolletta, “a pair of knickers intended for urban cycling that was designed and made in a tiny rented studio in downtown Los Angeles and sold via word-of-mouth through the local bike community. We grew into an innovative outdoor company found in shops worldwide with quite a few notable achievements.”

swrve Apperal Closes its Doors jeans to ride in
(Photo/swerve)

We were one of the first companies to offer cycling-specific jeans, we were the first company in the world to use stretch CORDURA® denim, and, looking back, we were at the dawn of the men’s performance stretch jeans phenomenon you see today. From there, we expanded our offerings with our Durable Cotton and – TRANSVERSE – product ranges that really let us expand on the concept of technical performance apparel for everyday use,” said Rolletta.

swrve to Make a Difference

Over the past two decades, swerve has supplied some pretty heavy hitters with quality clothing. According to Muriel, they’ve sent packages to CERN, the Smithsonian, NASA, and “other esteemed institutions of knowledge”.

swrve Apperal Closes its Doors Eric Cedeno
(Photo/swerve) Eric Cedeño

She also said that some of their customers are teachers, park rangers, artists, and researchers. As well as writers, chefs, bike collective members, conservationists, and architects. “In other words, people who are creative, thoughtful, and dedicated to making the world a better place.

“People who value nature and spending time in the great outdoors as much as we do. We have been in the absolute best company”.

The Landscape Has Changed

After 20 years, however, the landscape of our industry has changed,” explains Bartol. “We’ve seen the cost of business increase across the board. From the cost of our fabrics, to cut + sew, transportation, shipping, e-commerce platforms, payroll, marketing, etc. etc. It’s never been easy to run a small business. But every year we face growing costs to the point where we can’t raise our prices and remain competitive.”

swrve Apperal Closes its Doors swrve Belgean winter cap
(Photo/ Ron Frazelle) Me wearing my favorite cold weather cap, the swrve Belgian Winter Cap

swerve is a very small company that’s held its own against some much bigger apparel companies in the last 20 years. That’s something that they are very proud of, and well… should be.

It Won’t be Immediate

We’ve been told that they still have a fair amount of inventory for most items, but will no longer be making new runs of their products. They actually may still do a few small in-house runs.

No Closeout Sale

They say they are going to be operating the business normally for as long as they have inventory. And, as their warehouse empties and they start to run out of inventory, they will “likely have some sort of sale, but not until the very end”.

swrve Apperal Closes its Doors jeans and a cat
(Photo/swerve)

There is no word on what that timeline will look like. Some of their close friends have been stockpiling their favorite items. According to swrve, “we may be running out of inventory more quickly, or not! We shall see”!

Hit the link below to get your swerve on while the gettin’ is good!

swrve.us

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mud
mud
1 month ago

Well I guess the market for $125-150 jeans for riding is smaller than they hoped. Who woulda thunk?

Greg
Greg
1 month ago
Reply to  mud

I think it is more accurate to say that they made really nice jeans, in the US, of sustainably-sourced materials that worked well for active lifestyles. When expressed in those terms, the price seems much more reasonable. I am very sad to see them go.

Rob
Rob
1 month ago
Reply to  Greg

Not made in USA according to the website. I like their products.

IMG_1276.jpeg
Bart Taylor
Bart Taylor
1 month ago
Reply to  mud

They released their first cycling specific jeans back in 2008 and have been doing Cordura jeans for over a decade. Those jeans simply don’t wear out the way regular denim does.

Evan
Evan
1 month ago
Reply to  mud

how much do you think a quality pair of pants is supposed to cost? that’s literally a fraction of some raw denim jeans

syborg
syborg
1 month ago

Never heard of them…could be part of the problem.

Yeah sure
Yeah sure
1 month ago
Reply to  syborg

Must not have a cool sounding job title that for the most part makes no money.

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago
Reply to  syborg

Funny that BikeRumor bemoans the loss of small businesses while almost exclusively hyping giant corporation press releases and calling it news.

Yeah sure
Yeah sure
1 month ago

“some of their customers are teachers, park rangers, artists, and researchers. As well as writers, chefs, bike collective members, conservationists“. Thats your problem, when you sell higher end hand made in first world goods it’s imperative that your customers actually make money. Shame the jeans look like a great product that can have many applications outside of just cycling.

wvjeepguy81
wvjeepguy81
1 month ago

 “teachers, park rangers, artists, and researchers. As well as writers, chefs, bike collective members, conservationists, and architects. “In other words, people who are creative, thoughtful, and dedicated to making the world a better place.”

What about the masses? The weekend warriors, blue-collar parents trying to find time to ride, the kid who works all summer to afford anything at all. People who need a product to be good value and long-lasting?

Yeah….guess those select few elites weren’t enough of a customer base.

case
case
1 month ago
Reply to  wvjeepguy81

Elites? Not sure you know what the ave teacher or park ranger pay is.

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago
Reply to  wvjeepguy81

Lol how much do you think artists, teachers and conservationist make? You think an artist makes enough to buy an expensive pair of jeans let alone a pickup truck? Stop using the demise of small business to wedge more division, we’re all people, we’re all struggling. Elite’s drive $200k cars and pay minimum wage, they’re not driving 30 year old honda’s and working at your local public institution.

FrankTheTank
FrankTheTank
1 month ago

This is such a shame. Their soft.shell trousers are amazing for winter riding. I haven’t seen anything else like them. So comfortable, they became my daily wear pants for winter.

King County
King County
1 month ago

I never saw such an article before that promoted products so well for a brand going out of business. It inspired me to go to Swrve.us, where I checked out jeans that show a ton of bad lifestyle photos. They should have taken the simple Levis route: pix from all sides with a white background and nice lighting.

Bud P
Bud P
1 month ago
Reply to  King County

I also wanted to check out their stuff.
Agree, maybe both, why not both.. i couldn’t really see the difference between thight slim and loose¯⁠\⁠_⁠ಠ⁠_⁠ಠ⁠_⁠/⁠¯

myke
myke
1 month ago

The best-fitting pants I have ever purchased, Swrve! I hope they can find someone to take on the brand and support the community!

pablo luzall
pablo luzall
1 month ago

breaks my heart to see brilliant small companies like swrve and kitsbow go under : ((

Gary G
Gary G
1 month ago

I bought a pair of their jeans ten years ago that are STILL going…and maybe that’s the problem: they made them too well. Soon as I heard this news, I ordered two more pairs that’ll probably last a couple of decades between them. They’re a mix of cotton and 55% cordura nylon, and even though they look just like regular jeans, they’re just about effing indestructible…both on and off a bicycle. Absolutely far and away the best jeans I’ve ever owned.

Should add, their 3/4 length shorts were and are equally fantastic. I’ve got three of those.

Greg P
Greg P
1 month ago

I have been mountain biking for decades and have never ever worn a pair of jeans biking. Ever. Even going back to my Schwinn 10-speed days.

Jacob
Jacob
1 month ago

I have 2 pairs of their winter riding pants! So GHOOD! Sad to see them closing the doors but they did have a pretty high price tag.

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