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Mokumono Cycles wants to bring bike manufacturing back to the Netherlands

Mokumono cycles promo shot
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Mokumono cycles, side shot

The Netherlands is widely regarded as the cycling capital of the world, and until recently had a burgeoning bicycle manufacturing industry dating back to the late 1800’s. However, with costs rising several larger Dutch brands have moved their production overseas. By adopting more automated and less costly manufacturing techniques borrowed from the automotive industry, the Mokumono’s creators want to bring back bicycle production to the Netherlands.

Their simplified, yet thoughtfully equipped commuter bike certainly seems like the most suitable way to accomplish that goal. The name Mokumono is an abbreviation of the words ‘mokum’ which refers to Amsterdam, and ‘mono’ as a reference to the frame’s monocoque construction.

The Mokumono is currently seeking funds on Kickstarter, and the campaign needs some support before it ends on May 20th to see this bike go into production…

The Mokumono bike was initially created by Amsterdam’s Bob Schiller as his final grad-year project at Eindhoven Design Academy. Two years and three prototypes later its design is now finalized and ready for production.

Mokumono cycles, frame angle

The bike’s frame is constructed from two 7000-grade sheets of aluminum which are pressed into shape, then laser welded into one piece. The Mokumono’s design leaves the middle seam as a feature that aesthetically splits the frame into two halves as a nod to the production method. The cantilever rear stays were designed to allow some degree of ride compliance from the typically stiff aluminum, versus a traditional triangular seat/chainstay arrangement. This design also eliminates the need for a coupler to facilitate drive belt installation and removal.

Mokumono cycles, riding shot
*Photos courtesy of Mokumono

The bike is offered as a single speed or an 8-speed version equipped with a Shimano Alfine internal rear hub. While the Mokumono comes with 32c tires, the frame and fork can accommodate widths up to 50mm. The make and model of the fork hasn’t been determined, but it will apparently be made of aluminum.

The component build is a clever setup of commuter friendly components, most notably the no-maintenance Gates carbon belt drive system. It also includes puncture-resistant Continental Grand Prix 4 Season tires, and a Brooks Cambium C-17 saddle. They didn’t skimp on the brakes, as the Shimano 105 hydraulic calipers are set up with finned brake pads and heat-shedding Ice tech rotors.

Mokumono cycles, rear axle Mokumono cycles, cable routing

The frame also features internal brake cable routing, plus rack and fender mounts. Low-profile Curana C-Lite aluminum fenders will be available as an accessory if the campaign is successful.

The Mokumono frame only comes in one unisex size, which should fit riders between 5’7” and 6’3” most comfortably. However, to fit a wider range of riders the creators plan to sell the bike as S/M/L models with three different length stems (70, 100 and 110mm) and ship the bikes with uncut fork steer tubes and spacers to allow up to 50mm of stack height adjustment.

Mokumono cycles, white and black frames Mokumono cycles, red and blue frames

Estimated weight for the complete bike is approx. 21lbs for the single speed and 25.5lbs for the 8 speed model. Mokumono will offer a five year warranty on the frames against defects in material or workmanship to the original owner. The bike will be sold in your choice of Gloss White, Matte Black, Deep Metallic Blue or Deep Metallic Red.

Currently, super early bird buyers can pre-purchase a single speed for approx. $1310 USD, or an 8 speed for $1597. Global shipping is available (at an additional cost), and delivery is estimated for Nov. 2016. For more information, check out the Kickstarter campaign here.

mokumonocycles.com

 

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Ted
Ted
6 years ago

As nice as the bike looks its a case of the designer totally ignoring safety and function.
Keeping the welded seams might seriously hurt if not cut your crotch in an accident and lifting and shouldering the bike will cause pain too.

Huffytoss
Huffytoss
6 years ago
Reply to  Ted

Really? Guess you never had a bike with a welded seam down the center.

myke2241
myke2241
6 years ago
Reply to  Ted

Dude it’s not like T-Pain is welding these up on the DL! It sounds you have never ridden a bike in your life! Btw do you really think these bikes would be subject to zero safety tests?

pog
pog
6 years ago

“Burgeoning” implies something that is newly growing, so it’s the wrong word to use if you’re following with “back to the late 1800s”.

Erik
Erik
6 years ago

I just want to point out this – if they’re sending the work to China or Taiwan, it’s not really over seas, but across continent, right?

Cheese
Cheese
6 years ago
Reply to  Erik

It’s over the Black and Caspian seas, Erik.

Cheese
Cheese
6 years ago

It’s odd to say this assembly method was borrowed from the automotive industry since most cars are spot welded from steel stampings.

myke2241
myke2241
6 years ago
Reply to  Cheese

I think the reference is to stamp molding and robotics. Btw your door hinges are fully welded

Cheese
Cheese
6 years ago

Are these frames robotically welded, though?

Jason K
Jason K
6 years ago

First of all, if you’re cutting your crotch on weld beads, you’re doing it wrong. It doesn’t matter much *what* you’re doing. If you’re cutting your crotch on a weld bead, your technique is the problem.

Secondly, there are many bikes (Foes, for example) that use stamped sheet halves welded together. Gored crotches are somehow not more prevalent among riders of these bikes than they are among the general cycling public.

Finally, this bike uses laser welding, as opposed to standard TIG welding. Laser welding creates a much smaller weld bead than TIG does.

So theres really no big safety issue here.

JasonK
JasonK
6 years ago

To answer the question about whether these frames are robotically welded: laser welding is essentially a robotic technique.

Manual laser welding rigs exist, but they’re very different from your typical Miller TIG setup. There’s also such a thing as laser hybrid welding. But most likely this will be robotically welded.

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