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MRP introduces ‘Better Boost Adapter Kits,’ Centerlock version coming soon

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MRP has been on a roll lately with new products. Last week saw the addition of more fitments for their Ramp Control Cartridges as well as their new Micro XCg guard for small chainrings. Now, the company has set their focus on Boost hub adapters – though at this time it’s just the front. Calling it the Better Boost Adapter Kit, MRP is banking on the hope that riders are willing to shell out for a Boost adapter kit that doesn’t require you to touch your spokes.

How so? Well, the MRP Better Boost kit is designed so that you do not have to re-dish the wheel once it’s installed (dishing is the process of centering the rim). That should make it a lot easier for the average rider to just plug and play, without having to touch a spoke wrench. However, on kits like the Lindarets/Wolf Tooth Components Boostinator, the companies claim that re-dishing the wheel actually makes most wheels stronger by giving them a more symmetrical build. It seems then that the choice comes down to simplicity, and how much you want to pay for it. The Better Boost Kit will have you out on the trail faster, but it is almost double the price of the Boostinator. Due to the way the Boostinator is designed, front hubs only need one end cap and do not need the rotor spacer so the Better Boost kits include more pieces. It’s also limited to 6 bolt rotors, though they have a solution…

All photos c. MRP

Instead of a single spacer that requires you to dish the wheel over to compensate, the Better Boost Kit includes two end caps that add 5mm to each side of the hub (going from 100mm to 110mm total).Then the rotor is spaced out with a 5mm spacer for proper alignment. To see exactly how it’s installed, check out this video MRP recently posted to instagram.

Due to the fact that a Centerlock Rotor can’t be shimmed over like a 6 bolt rotor can, MRP will soon have a solution – which is to move the brake instead of the rotor. Their post mount adapter will move the brake caliper over to meet the rotor. We’ll have more details on this kit as soon as it’s available. MRP mentions that they do not have plans for a rear adapter kit for either brake at this time.

Initially, the Better Boost Kits will be available to fit either the DT Swiss 350 15×100 6 bolt or DT Swiss 240s “Fifteen” 15×100 6 bolt front hubs. Priced at $44.95 and $49.95 respectively, the kit includes two precision machined end caps that are designed to stay in place in the hub shell, the rotor spacer, and six XL T25 rotor bolts. The kits are only for hubs with 15mm thru axles and to space 100mm hubs out to 110mm. Better Boost Kits are shipping now.

Noah from MRP also mentioned that their Ribbon fork which we spotted at Eurobike will be shipping mid March.

mrpbike.com

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17 Comments
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boom
boom
6 years ago

Only mildly sketchy

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago
Reply to  boom

what exactly is sketchy?

Josh
Josh
6 years ago

just buy a new 350 hub, too many extra parts in this, and you don’t get any of the benefits of boost by using adapters.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
6 years ago
Reply to  Josh

YOU WIN!!

BoostYo!
BoostYo!
6 years ago
Reply to  Josh

^^this
If you get a frame/fork with boost spacing might as well take advantage of the stiffer wheels….
yes, this would be a product to revive those old wheels you already have, but come on! This isn’t just a lateral move, its a step back!
I will say tho, products like these are definitely needed but if you’re reading this, consider using them as a last low cost option instead of buying boost wheels/hubs for you fancy new boost frame.

contrarian
contrarian
6 years ago
Reply to  Josh

The benefit to the adapter kits is if you’ve got a fleet of Boost and Non-Boost bikes you can swap wheels between them. For example, I’ve got a Boost fork, but two sets of wheels for the bike (275 and 29) and I swap them on and off with another bike that is a traditional 100mm front hub. My only issue is the expense of this kit at nearly $50. I got an adapter kit for my E13 TRS+ for $20.

Dude
Dude
6 years ago
Reply to  Josh

The only extra part is a shim for the rotor and people have been running shims for rotor spacing forever. Otherwise it’s just replacement endcaps and bolts, not adding anything extra. This is an ideal solution for someone on a non boost bike with a high end wheelset that wants to upgrade to a new boost fork without having to switch wheels.

Dude
Dude
6 years ago

Nice, MRP is killing it with the new products and aftermarket solutions!

MRP
MRP
6 years ago

There is exactly one “extra” part in the 6-bolt version adapter (the rotor spacer) and no extra parts in the forthcoming Centerlock version (assuming you’re currently using a brake adapter).

For those wanting ALL the “benefits” of Boost, sure, get a new wheel/hub. If you’ve got a nice wheel/hub and just want to convert it for use in a Boost fork, this is your ticket. Maybe you’re looking for the increased tire clearance afforded by a Boost fork? Maybe the fork you want is ONLY available in Boost. This kit lets you take advantage of those scenarios. The only “benefits” you’re not getting with this versus a true Boost hub are those resulting from the increased flange spacing.

Cheers

Reformed Roadie
6 years ago

Where is the kit for using boost wheels with 20×110 forks? There has to be enough Fox 36s, among others to offer it. It may require different calipher adaptor; so be it. It be nice to keep my $1k fork from going obsolete, if I want to bolt it into a new frame.

MRP
MRP
6 years ago

Problem there lies in the brake location. Going 5mm inboard for a non-Boost wheel/hub in a Boost fork works, the opposite does not.

Marc L
6 years ago

Roadie,
While we can do a lot of things with the Boostinator (and MRP with their kit), we are limited by the inside diameter of the bearings. So hubs designed for 15mm thru axles rarely have room for a 20mm axle. The exceptions (like DT’s 240 OS) typically have factory kits.

Collin
Collin
6 years ago
Reply to  Marc L

I think one solution could be an adapter axle. (Although I don’t have experience with this fork) most forks are thread all the way through on the threaded side. Therefore if you put a press fit bushing on the non thread side of the fork and had a 15 mm axle that was stepped out to a 20mm diameter and was threaded at the 20 mm side. Its essentially a reverse skewer as it only threads on the shoulder instead of the tip. (If this spawns a kit, I expect a paypal payment to ccsnyder AT mtu DOT edu 🙂

Reformed Roadie
6 years ago
Reply to  Marc L

I think you have it backwards. My Fox36 came with a 15×100 TA. The fork has top-hat shaped spacers that step it down to the 15×100 hub size. I switched to a 20mm axel and ditched the spacers. In theory, you would be able to machine off the part of the spacers so you are only reducing the axle diameter, not the width…then there is the calipher spacing to deal with…

firevsh2o
firevsh2o
6 years ago

Is there a maximum rotor size for this solution? Wolftooth lists max. 183mm for their spaced out rotors.

Lost Kiwi
Lost Kiwi
6 years ago

I have made several kits for personal use exactly like this (exact the fancy anno) and have beat on them for a solid season with no issues.

Ewen Robertson
Ewen Robertson
6 years ago

The better way IMHO is to add 10mm to the RH side on the front wheel and re dish the wheel. This then gives almost identical spoke tangent from the flanges and even spoke tension. Big advantage dishless wheel, and no change to disc bolts and leverage.

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