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NAHBS 2015: No. 22 heads to races with 13.1-pound titanium/carbon road bike, updates others

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No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

No. 22’s Reactor is their all-new race bike, taking over the top of the performance line from the Great Divide as a more race oriented model.

It replaces the seat tube with a carbon tube, which maybe saves about 50g when comparing apples to apples. But, since the tube goes all the way thru, it forms a seatmast that ultimately saves about 100g of system weight compared to using a standard seat post. It also allows them to make the ride a bit more compliant and lets them tune the final ride characteristics rather than leave it up to whatever seatpost the customer ended up with.

Up front, it gets an all-new headtube that’s tapered and uses integrated bearing shelves, something more typically found on carbon frames. That lets them use pressed bearings, which are much cleaner looking, and it saves weight. The new tube, headset spec and other details put total weight savings just in the headtube area is 150g.

Not every part of the bike got lighter, though…

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

The etched head badge instead of the normal titanium badge that’s bonded on also saves a few grams.

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

The seat mast topper is the forged version we saw at Philly Bike Expo, courtesy of Stijl Cycles’ Hinmaton, who helps design several of the tubes and dropouts for No. 22’s bikes.

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

The chainstays are 1″ diameter that have been ovalized to clear a 28mm tire, and the downtube is bigger than the other bikes, too. All in the name of stiffness.

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

The larger chainstays required new dropouts, so they developed these huge, 3D hooded dropouts that are internally relieved. The result, says No. 22’s Michael Smith, co-founder, is a massively stiff rear end.

Including seatmast and hardware, anticipated frame weight is around 1,370g. This complete bike came in at just 13.1lb with Reynolds RZR 46 wheels, Cannondale SiSL2 spider cranks, eeBrakes and Dura-Ace Di2 group.

No22 Great Divide titanium

The Great Divide was available with disc brakes as an extra cost option, but now it’s a standard offering.

No22-Great-Divide-titanium-road-bike02

Delicious finishes like this gold etching treatment may cost you a bit more, though.

No22 Broken Arrow thru axle cyclocross bike

The Broken Arrow cyclocross bike was announced at the end of December, but only with standard quick release dropouts. Now, it gains a thru axles option. Smith said they’d held off offering that since sourcing a fork had been an issue…until TRP’s new fork came around.

22bicycles.com

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jeff
jeff
8 years ago

Those are some sweet bikes. Having owned a couple of Merlins in the past, I love Ti bikes, how they look, how they ride and the durability of them. Although just about every (newer) bike I own is carbon, I will someday build another Ti bike

M.C. Slammer
M.C. Slammer
8 years ago

I’ll take Ti over carbon every time. I have my eye on the divide.

CXisfun
CXisfun
8 years ago

“Delicious finishes like this gold etching treatment may cost you a bit more, though.”

That’s an anodized finish.

Sam
Sam
8 years ago

The Broken Arrow won best cross bike using the X-12 system!

Brian S
Brian S
8 years ago

“The chainstays are 1″ diameter that have been ovalized to clear a 28mm tire…”

Interesting a race oriented bike being designed to fit 28 tires. Jan Heine (Mr. Bicycle Quarterly) is happy. 🙂

sean
sean
8 years ago

actually, CXisfun, if you want to pick nits, that finish is oxidised, not anodized.

shafty
shafty
8 years ago

@sean Actually Sean, anodizing IS oxidizing. The different colors are a function of the oxides thickness and it’s influence on reflected light. Bronze/gold is indeed achievable with titanium anodization.

CXisfun
CXisfun
8 years ago

What were you saying again, Sean?

Also FYI: the boys in the booth making the bikes were the ones talking about their anodizing, it’s not like I picked that term out of thin air.

OGS
OGS
8 years ago

looks very nice, visually.
But now we have a Ti bike with carbon seat-tube and carbon fork – and the frames is still 1,370g, which is about 670g, or 1.5 lbs over state-of-the-art carbon offerings.
Most weight savings to get back to 13.1 lbs come from Cannondale Spidering, Cannondale cranks, and gruppo (could be lighter if they went with SRAM Red instead of Dura Ace).

So if replacing Ti seattube with carbon is a good idea, same for carbon fork, and carbon wheels are (supposedly) better than aluminum, what about a radical idea of using carbon for top tube, down tube, chain and seat stays?

Aerodynamics of a Ti tubes frame, which accepts 28mm tires, is also quite questionable for “race” frame – carbon can be molded into far more aerodynamic shapes, lighter, and for a cost that is well below $4K for a frame.

I don’t mean to make it into another carbon vs. Ti vs. steel arguments, but what is this about this frame that makes it more appealing than state of the art carbon frames?

BJ
BJ
8 years ago

Wow,
great Ti Bike with neat details.
By the way: does anyone know what kind of adapter they use to fix the junction box to the steerer tube?
Is this part also available for campa units?

jeff
jeff
8 years ago

@OGS, a light carbon frame and fork will weigh around 1100 grams, 800 grams for the frame, 300 grams for the fork( talking averages on some light carbon frames/ forks) so this frame and fork is just at 1/2 lb heavier.
Also the aero is not any different that a carbon bike with round tubes, if you want to compare, compare apples to apples.
I dont know if you have ever ridden a titanium bike, but they have this “un indescribable” ride quality un matched by just about any frame material.

CXisfun
CXisfun
8 years ago

@jeff: a light carbon frame is 800g-ish, as light as sub-700g. This is 1370g for the FRAME, not frame AND fork. So yeah, the difference is 500-600g or more.

With that said, I’d happily sacrifice a few hundred grams for a quality Ti ride. OGS clearly hasn’t ridden Ti, or he wouldn’t have to ask the question of “why Ti over carbon?”

jeff
jeff
8 years ago

I dont/ didnt see where the weight of 1370 grams did not include the fork, this is bikerumor, so it probably got omitted.
I have a 56cm Cannondale Evo, with Campy Record, but some heavier wheels, mine weighs 15lb even with pedals.
I cant see why some complain about a 13.1lb bike, I would care if the frame weighed 5lbs, and all the components where rideable.

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