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New Canyon Endurace Road Bike Gets Storage Inside and Ultralight CFR Treatment

Canyon Endurace full close
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If long-distance road riding and grand fondos are your jam, listen up! The Canyon Endurace is getting modern with a new VCLS 2.0 suspension seatpost, larger tire clearance, all-new internal frame storage, and a top-tier ultralight CFR version.  

Canyon Endurace versatile all-rounder endurance road bike

Though the frame and overall design of the Canyon Endurace have subtly evolved, the ethos has remained constant; a comfortable ride to take on your biggest days on the road bike. The updates to the line further cement the Endurace into the endurance road category and continue to brush up against gravel boundaries… 

What’s New — Canyon Endurace

Canyon Endurace HT

There are quite a few changes to the Endurace, but let’s start with the frame and the most notable additions. First off, the new Canyon Endurace fully embraces the in-frame storage box concept, or as Canyon calls it, the LOAD box.

Canyon Endurace staogare

Differing from the down tube glovebox we’ve seen most often in modern mountain bikes, this all-new new LOAD box is a top tube storage compartment that acts like a saddle bag for tools, tubes, and all the stuff one usually forgets before running out the door for a ride. The LOAD box also frees up space under your seat for additional storage for more tubes and flat repair gear if you’re out for a major ride… or a bikepacking-style saddle bag if you are going on a major adventure like the Transcontinental.

Inside the LOAD box is a neoprene sleeve like a sausage casing that includes pockets for the Canyon 3-in-1 tool, Dyna Plug, and a 16g CO2. The bike will come with the sleeve. But as for the accessories, you’ll need to purchase that aftermarket, or fit in tools you already have at home.

More Room for Fun (Thanks to Bigger Tire Clearance!)

Canyon Endurace rear triangle

Canyon has embraced another modern trend and has gone fully in with the large volume tire clearance, more so than ever before. The new Endurace now will fit up to 35mm tires, pushing it into the same tire clearance as its cyclocross bike, the Canyon Inflite.

Canyon Endurace steer knock block

The larger tire clearance can give the Endurace a life beyond the road and turns this once-all-road bike into a fast-gravel-capable machine now, too. 

More Aero, Too

Canyon Endurace front on

This new Endurace also dips into Canyon’s Aerodynamics partnership with Swiss-Side Aero and squeezes some free speed from the updated Endurace design. The aero advantages start with cleaning up the front end with an all-new (for this bike) aero cockpit, tucking all the cables away inside.

The actually 3-piece carbon Canyon CP0018 is the brand’s aero “one-piece” cockpit that utilizes an adjustable width handlebar setup (40, 42 & 44cm widths from one telescoping bar) and a unique zero-top-cap design. The headset stack compression uses a Canyon-specific top-loading tool that acts like a conventional top cap.

From my first experience with the CP0018, I can say confidently the preload adjustment is very easy, though it takes some time to get used to. Our review Endurace came with 30mm of headset spacers, in addition to what it pictured above. After removing those extra spacers, there was no need to cut the fork, only to add additional compression to the stack and re-tighten the single-pitch bolt.

Canyon Endurace headtube

The CP0018 cockpit eliminates any hint of cables or brake lines from the front end. Plus, with the addition of the new cockpit, Canyon also narrowed the headtube, creating a more slippery front end into the wind.

Canyon Endurace stack

The slimmer headtube fades into the fork, where the design team borrowed inspiration from the Canyon Aeroad. The new Endurace fork is slim, sturdy, compliant, and matches nicely with the newly narrowed headtube. 

Canyon Enduracefork

The frame seems to get a complete aero treatment, even if it’s not taken to aero race bike extremes, with a slimmer but deeper down tube, deeper headtube, and subtle sculpting to the tube set overall — most notably the deeper aero seat tube with its larger rear wheel cutout. With the aforementioned combined, the new Canyon Endurace is claimed to be 7 Watts faster than the previous model. Tested at 45kph*

All New S15 VCLS 2.0 — Seated Compliance 

One of the most recognizable features of the Canyon Endurace is the split carbon seatpost, the VCLS 2.0 design is also now on their MVDP Inflite cross bike, too. The seatpost sees its first update; this new S15 VCLS 2.0 boasts 20mm of max travel. The new design uses the same leaf-sprung design and a floating saddle clamp as before, keeping it maintenance-free and reasonably lightweight. 

Introducing the first Canyon Endurace CFR

Canyon Endurace CFR ESP

If you’re looking for the tip-top of the new Canyon Endurace line, it’s the CFR. Just like the Aeroad CFR and Ultimate CFR, the new Endurace CFR brings all the ultralight carbon bells and whistles, and it’s only available with suitably top-tier Shimano Dura-Ace Di2, SRAM Red eTap AXS, or Campagnolo Super Record Wireless groupsets.

Only the Di2 model is coming to the US market for the time being.

It’s not just the spec that makes this bike lighter — though it helps. The frame is 100g lighter than the CF SLX version of the Endurace. A weight reduction was achieved using a higher-mod carbon layup compared to the standard frames, yielding a higher strength-to-weight ratio. 

Plus, it gets lighter paint schemes, too.

Canyon Endurace CFR Specs

The only real notable difference between the higher-end build options is that the Campagnolo build comes in slightly lighter at 7.2kg vs. 7.3kg for the others. A few grams of that weight loss could be attributed to those narrower 19mm internal x 45mm deep Campagnolo Bora Ultra WTO wheels, which are a tap lighter than the much wider 22mm internal x 45mm seep DT Swiss ERC 1100 wheels. The other being that the Campy groupset does NOT include a power meter crankset, making it incrementally lighter than D-A or Red.

Canyon Endurace — Fit and Geometry

Canyon Endurace full

The new Canyon Endurace family has preserved its well-established sport road geometry, with a comfortable fit designed for riders of all abilities featuring a slightly upright position on the bike relative to Canyon’s road racing geo.

Canyon Endurace carbon and BB

The head tube angle is only incrementally slackened, while the effective seat angle is almost a degree slacker across the board.

didn’t change, but the stack and reach saw a makeover. In a size medium (our demo size), for example, the new Canyon Endurace has the exact same Stack & Reach compared to the previous version, with the same chainstay length and a 3mm longer wheelbase. 

Canyon Endurace Geo

This conservative, laid-back geometry gives the rider a relatively more upright position and could take more pressure off their lower back and shoulders. If you’re going out on a long day on the bike, this balanced but comfortable geometry could be the difference between making it a century or a double metric.

As for sizing, Canyon should have an Endurace that will fit everyone — with 8 frame sizes. Sizes again range from 3XL to 2XL, with the smallest two (2XL and 3XL) utilizing 650b wheels to keep steering & handling characteristics constant across the line without compromising on toe overlap. 

Canyon Endurace CF SLX — Specs and Pricing

Canyon Endurace cranker

The new Canyon CF SLX is available worldwide in five different models starting at 3700€ — just three for the USA, starting from $4200. All CF SLX models share the same base frame (Endurace CF SLX R077) and fork (FK0129 CF Disc), the adjustable carbon CP0018 Aerocockpit, and the updated Canyon S15 VCLS 2.0 CF seatpost.

The CF SLX line also shares the same Fizik Argo Tempo R3 saddle and Continental GP 5000 S TR tubeless-ready tires — spec’d 30mm tire in the front and 32mm in the rear.

Canyon Endurace wheels LN

The different groupsets drive the price differences, but all are electronic and arrive in either Shimano or SRAM configuration. Most bikes come power meter equipped; Shimano bikes arrive with a non-drive side 4iiii power meter and SRAM bikes with Quarq Spider powermeters. As for wheels, there are two configurations; DT Swiss Endurance LN as a boxy, low profile alloy (22mm deep/22mm wide internal) do-it-all wheelset, and the more premium carbon DT Swiss ERC 1400 (35mm/22mm wide internal) wheels as the Aero option.

The existing previous generation entry-level carbon Endurace CF and aluminum Endurace AL continue on unchanged.

New Canyon Endurace — Pricing & Availability

Canyon Endurace DT Swiss
  • Canyon Endurace CFR WRL – 10,000€
  • Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 – $9000 / 9500€
  • Canyon Endurace CFR AXS – 9500€
  • Canyon Endurace CF SLX 8 AXS Aero – $5500 / 5500€
  • Canyon Endurace CF SLX 8 Di2 Aero – $5500 / 5200€
  • Canyon Endurace CF SLX 8 Di2 – $4200 / 4200€
  • Canyon Endurace CF SLX 7 AXS – 4000€
  • Canyon Endurace CF SLX 7 Di2 – 3700€
rear Canyon Endurace

The new Canyon Endurace line is available now for purchase online direct from Canyon.com for most of the world, with the US market getting the new bikes starting next week. Although that one CFR is already available in the states, too.

Look for our full review of this Ultegra Di2-spec’d Canyon Endurace CL SLX 8 coming shortly. 

Canyon.com

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17 Comments
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DefRyder
DefRyder
8 months ago

Just checked Canyon USA’s site and it appears the CFR w/SRAM Red AXS is available (only size L for now with others ‘coming soon)?

Last edited 8 months ago by DefRyder
SteveT
SteveT
8 months ago

With the component configurations shown these bikes price wise are no $ cheaper than any competitor selling bikes through a local bike shop. Why would I buy one of these and lose the support of the local shop that sells me the bike, when the prices are effectively the same?

And with no local bike shop selling me the bike, why would I buy a bike that has a one piece stem/bar where the only way to change the stem length for adjustability and dialing in fit would be to order a brand new bar-stem and then have to pay a local shop to reinstall it?

Sorry, but the pricing seems crazy versus the competition given that you essentially have no local support and they have cut out the local dealer.

Dinger
Dinger
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

Comparable spec Specialized, Trek, Cannondale, etc. are all $2k+ more than these. Essentially you’re the next spec down at the same price for those brands. An S-Works Roubaix sells for ~$14k against Canyon’s $9k for equivalent spec/weight. That’s a whole extra Ultrgra Di2 bike’s difference!

Agree on local support. This brand requires one to be very confident in their own estimation of fit and possibly greater self-reliance for maintenance.

will
will
8 months ago
Reply to  Dinger

yeah to be fair they have a 4k USD di2. with that said its still much more than Canyon used to be. Basically the more popular it gets, the higher the price goes. Eventually it’ll be the same as everyone else.

When on sale, Specialized is actually a better deal these days.

FritzP
FritzP
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

While the Cannondale Synapse DA Di2 is also $9k, the Trek, Specialized, BMC endurance bikes are thousands dollars more with the same component spec as the Canyon.

Robin
Robin
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

To be fair, not all bike brands sold in LBSs allow swapping out for more appropriately sized handlebars, cranks, or even saddles. Sure, this should option for all bikes since fit and contact point happiness are critical. It’s also true that someone not sure of their fit might not be able to pick the correct size, but that same person DOES have the option of going to an LBS and paying for a fit. That person can then use those numbers to find the right size Canyon. Even if they pay for what’s typically the most expensive fit (~$300 USD), they’ll still be ahead of the game compared to the price of an equivalent size and spec Trek, Specialized, et al…..just as others have pointed out. In fact, you could buy the right-sized handlebar and the right saddle for you and still be ahead on cost compared to the aforementioned equivalent models from other brands.

And you can still patronize your chosen LBS. They don’t make much at all on bike sales anyway. LBSs make the most money on service, accessories, and so on. And any LBS worth your money is going to be more than happy to work on a Canyon. If they refuse, they’re not worth your money.

Andrew
Andrew
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

Try compare the same specs with big brands. I’ve paid 4700 Euro for Endurace CF sl 8 Force last year, the same specs with Trek, Scott or Specialized would have costed me 2K euro more, and actually 3K euro more with Specialized but with lousy wheels. And without powermeter.

Jaws
Jaws
8 months ago

Can anyone confirm the tire clearance of 35mm started in this story? I scanned all of the Endurance bikes on the Canyon US site, and only found tire clearance mentioned on one bike, and it was 32mm.

Jim E
Jim E
8 months ago

Those Top Tube lengths seem really short for the recommended height ranges. I am right in the middle of the Medium size range for height and sometimes feel my 56cm top tube ’07 Cannondale Synapse is too short while still riding a 120mm stem. If I got the medium in this bike, I would need like a 150mm stem to equate my not very racy current fit.

jonathan
jonathan
8 months ago
Reply to  Jim E

56cm has been pretty standard for size L/56cm bikes for about as long as I’ve been aware of bikes. It’s getting longer these days on gravel bikes mimicking mtb “long top tube, short stem” school of thought.

Jim E
Jim E
7 months ago
Reply to  jonathan

My main point is that they are recommending that someone almost 6’1″ (185cm) could ride their medium with a 54cm top tube which seems very short unless they have T-Rex arms. Their height ranges don’t have any overlap which most brands do.

Dirk
Dirk
8 months ago

Euhm slackened seattube ? That’s so old school. Even with a 0mm setback it doesn’t work for me. That vcls clamp looks nice but it’s junk. I have sold my post because the saddle kept making creaking noise whatever I tried. The clamp hardly holds the rails. No Canyon for me.
Btw, it’s price wise ok till you need another seatpost and handlebar …

pablo luzall
pablo luzall
8 months ago

am i the only one here that finds these battery compartment look-alike cut-outs in a frame pretty dumb?

Raul Delgato
Raul Delgato
8 months ago

I wonder why they bother with the seat tube cut out when the tire comes nowhere close to the seat tube.

Chris
Chris
7 months ago
Reply to  Raul Delgato

Keeps room for 35c tires

Jay Ess
Jay Ess
7 months ago

Been riding an Endurace since 2017 and it’s the best road bike I’ve owned by a mile. At the time the Endurace and the Ultimate were the same frame with the Endurace simply having a 1cm taller headtube which changed the Stack/Reach numbers slightly. Swapped out the springy seatpost for a regular one and Bob’s your uncle 16lb disc Di2 bike. Looking at the new one, mine looks almost Identical AND is lighter. Also, no way that seat tube geometry on the chart is correct, as someone pointed out that’s way old school, my medium from 2017 is 73.5, I doubt they are going slacker when everybody else is going steeper? New Dura Ace Di2 wasn’t a big enough change for me to upgrade and new frames appear to be the same, looks like my bike is good for another 6 years.

Newbie
Newbie
14 days ago

Hi! I couldn’t find info elsewhere (or just didn’t know what to google) but could you tell me what is the purpose of the two screws and small plastic part in the bottom of the frame, near the crankset? can be seen in the second picture. Took it apart but now I can’t get it back. Thanks!

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