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New Pinarello Dogma F is Lighter but Places Higher Emphasis on Aerodynamics

Pinarello Dogma F
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2024 is an Olympic year, and the Tour is about to start. Naturally, we’re seeing many new road products pop up just in time for a double-header in France. Pinarello is no different, today launching the fully updated Dogma F.

As Pinarello’s do-it-all race bike, the company proudly points out that this hasn’t changed. The Dogma has a now 22-year history of being the main race bike for Pinarello teams on flat stages, climbing stages, even cobbled classics. We’re starting to see more of that from other brands with similar reasoning – you don’t want to have to stress about what bike to ride for any given stage. Just get on your race bike, and go.

Putting it out there immediately, the new Dogma F is lighter, but Pinarello states that the weight was not as important as the aerodynamics of the bike and rolling resistance. According to their research, improving the CdA (abbreviation for the coefficient of aerodynamic drag) by just 0.2% is the equivalent of saving 175g on the bike. Pinarello states they validated this theory by analyzing Geraint Thomas’ performance data from the 2022 Tour de France, measuring his energy output compared with potential aero savings.

The result is a new (still asymmetric) frame where nearly every detail has been redesigned for marginal gains. Pinarello claims to have achieved their 0.2% CdA improvement target utilizing updated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations followed by extensive time in the wind tunnel.

Highlights of the new aero improvements include a reduced thickness downtube that flows into a reduced-width head tube still with a ‘nose’ that was first introduced on the Dogma F8 in 2014. That nose has been redesigned with reduced volume and width, courtesy of a completely new proprietary headset.

The headset is where things get interesting. To make the head tube narrower, the headset had to be redesigned, which meant the steerer had to be redesigned. Now, the new Onda fork uses an oval steerer that is oriented with the wider parts pointing to the sides of the bike. That provided more space in front of the steerer to allow the cables to be run in front, instead of on the sides, which is where the width reduction comes in. The steerer is also said to be an improvement in compliance and handling, with more compliance fore/aft, while maintaining stiffness for handling side to side.

Moving down to the bottom bracket, the new “Aero-Keel” bottom bracket has been rotated by 3.5º to “create a keel shape that improves aerodynamic performance of the bottom bracket area by 1.2%.” More importantly, this new bottom bracket shape has allowed Pinarello to add more tire clearance, with the frame now comfortably clearing 700c x 30mm tires. According to Pinarello, this is the size tire the team wanted to run for cobbled races, so that’s what they got.

Additional aero improvements extend to the thru axles, now with shorter axles and nuts that are integrated into the carbon which allows for smooth surfaces on the outside of the fork. The rear gets the same treatment with the derailleur hanger integrated in a similar manner – no UDH here.

Other changes to the bike include a new, slimmer Onda fork with the mentioned oval steerer, but also a 47mm rake which claims to improve handling and speed on descents. All frame sizes will include this 47mm rake. The seatpost clamp has also been updated to make it lighter and cleaner. Now fully integrated into the seat tube, the clamp looks better, but more importantly, will be better protected from dust and sweat.

Up front, there’s also a new Talon Fast integrated cockpit with a 7º flare to the drops and a 7 or 4º inward bend depending on the size. The bar is said to be more aerodynamic and allows for a more natural riding position.

While Pinarello claims to have hit their 0.2% CdA improvement target, they also managed to reduce the frame weight by 108g from the previous edition. For complete builds, that works out to 6.63-6.88kg (14.62 – 15.17 lbs) for a 53cm without pedals or bottles depending on the build. Not only is the frame lighter, but it’s also stiffer thanks to the use of a new M40X carbon fiber from Torayca.

Complete builds will be offered in Shimano Dura-Ace Di2, the new SRAM RED AXS, or Campagnolo Super Record Wireless. Frames will be offered in 11 sizes from 43 to 62cm. When it comes to paint, you will have six stock choices including three with their new Luxter paint which changes color depending on the angle. Pricing for complete bikes starts at $14,500 and framsets with fork and seat post start at $6,950.

pinarello.com

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26 Comments
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Don Carboneone
Don Carboneone
23 days ago

“Pricing for complete bikes starts at $14,500”

LTFOL

Billyshoo
Billyshoo
23 days ago
Reply to  Don Carboneone

Lighter, stiffer, more aero, but NOT cheaper.

TKRidge2022
TKRidge2022
23 days ago

Umm….have we reached the limit of the fastest carbon shapes possible? Or does a .2% CdA improvement, a less than 4oz weight saving and some undefined added stiffness, as well as TdF cred, still command a $14.5K starting price? If most of want to ride faster, we could just ride in the drops more and lose a 2 or 3 excess kgs. It is beautiful though, no doubt.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago
Reply to  TKRidge2022

I’ve never cared for how they’ve looked and have had to send some back to Pinarello after seeing terrible paint issues(selling them, I’d never want to own one). That said, most of the people buying this won’t care about the price and have watches significantly more expensive than this bike is. Not everything is meant for everyone and they’ll offer one with a cheaper layup next year.

Oliver
Oliver
22 days ago

But have they fixed the seatstay / seatspost junction? Massive numbers of seatstay failures on the outgoing F, sometimes on the very first ride. But I guess it doesn’t really matter if you’re selling for 7k frame, 15k complete and it costs $300 to make the frame. Also, seriously, 400 minimum width bar? Rofl.

Dinger
Dinger
22 days ago
Reply to  Oliver

I would bet a carbon frame in this weight class costs much more to make, especially with tooling for 11 sizes on offer. Still far too rich for my blood.

Also have a look at the handlebar chart. These are flared drop bars. The 40cm is 34cm at the hoods.

Track
Track
22 days ago
Reply to  Dinger

Any the handlebar width is measured outer to outer, not center to center.

MagnanimousWaffle
MagnanimousWaffle
21 days ago
Reply to  Oliver

Massive numbers is a gross exaggeration – I am the SM at one of PINAs biggest US dealers and we have never seen one fail at the seatstay / seatspost junction — this is actually the first I have ever heard of it. A google search yields no results — Mind providing some actual evidence of this? genuinely curious…

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago

Yup, I worked for a big Pinarello dealer too. Never seen a problem there. I’ve sent some new ones back for questionable paint but no issues with the stay/seat tube

Oliver
Oliver
19 days ago

I don’t believe you … one I know had 4 in a month. And there are plenty of google hits.

MagnanimousWaffle
MagnanimousWaffle
15 days ago
Reply to  Oliver

Got it, so no evidence. Just an anecdotal story and a glorified Nuh-Uh!

agwolf
agwolf
22 days ago

Seems like the missed the boat here: no significant weight savings from the frame, no UDH, and only 30mm tire clearance? and, of course, the price. Yikes.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago
Reply to  agwolf

Going off their last bike, that 30mm is likely a very conservative number. Not really any different than my Domane that says 38 max but my tires measure 41 and I’d run 45s on it if I didn’t have a gravel bike.

Frippolini
Frippolini
22 days ago

Why bother with a $500 at the end of the price? $14.5k as a starting price is a price point that 99% of people can’t afford, and for those few who can, it would not make much difference paying 14.5k,18k or 25k.
Does anyone know how many of these Pinarello sells per year?

Dinger
Dinger
22 days ago
Reply to  Frippolini

The company peaked at €84m in 2022. Can’t find any reporting more recent than early 2023.

Dude
Dude
22 days ago
Reply to  Dinger

Latest I can find is for 2023 a stunning 103 M€, +40% on previous year but with a final loss of 1.2 M€, considering average price of 4-5k they probably sell 20-25k bikes per year.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago
Reply to  Frippolini

They’re going to come out with a version with a cheaper layup for a lot less money. This is just a flagship, like S-Works and Trek’s higher end layups

Grillis
Grillis
22 days ago

All that and still FUGLY as ever

Larry Falk
Larry Falk
22 days ago

Does the rim brake version come with the new WheelTop groupset?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago
Reply to  Larry Falk

I think it’s only Sora

Dave
Dave
21 days ago

Keep in mind one reason these are sold to the public is he UCI rule that if you are making bikes for the pro peloton they have to be available to the masses. That is the reason you can purchase that 30K TT bike from Wilier.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
20 days ago
Reply to  Dave

And Factor’s track bike for $60k

Andreas
Andreas
21 days ago

what does the graph with different materials show? there are no units or even heading?

Robin
Robin
20 days ago
Reply to  Andreas

The graph shows the tensile strength (GPa, gigapascals) for each of those CF series.

Ingram
Ingram
20 days ago
Reply to  Robin

It’s Young’s modulus (stiffness), not tensile strength. T700 has a modulus of 230 GPa.

Ingram
Ingram
20 days ago

classic marketing chart without unit!

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