New titanium Esker Hayduke & Japhy hardtail mountain bikes hit the trails

The new Esker Hayduke Ti and Japhy Ti mountain bikes take the versatile, trail-loving geometry of their steel hardtails and give them new life with seamless, butted, cold-shaped 3/2.5 titanium tubing.

Both share extremely similar frame details, and are designed around 120mm suspension forks. Here’s what you need to know to decide between them: The Hayduke Ti has a bit shorter TT/Reach/Wheelbase lengths and 67.6º head angle, and fits 29×2.6 or 27.5×3.0 tires. The Japhy Ti is a bit longer and gets a slacker 65º head angle, and is designed specifically for 29ers with a max 2.8″ tire width.

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of rear dropouts

Framesets come with Portage sliding dropouts, giving you hub/axle width and gearing options (like singlespeed) as well as the ability to slightly customize the geo.

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of chainstay yoke

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of chainstay yoke and tire clearance

A custom chainstay yoke increases tire clearance and room for 34-tooth round (or 32-tooth oval) chainrings.

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of downtube

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of finish and logos

A few extra braze-ons give you more spots to store stuff, and a bead blasted finish with rainbow anodized graphics makes it pretty.

esker hay duke ti and japhy titanium mountain bike closeup detail of head tube

Framesets come with the sliding dropouts, a Wolf Tooth Components headset, seat collar, and axle for $2300. Those, and a Level 2 complete bike ($5200) are available for purchase now with delivery in June. Level 1 and 3 complete bikes will be available later in the season for $4400, and $6000. Full spec builds and more details on their website.

EskerCycles.com

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Bubbrubb
Bubbrubb
6 months ago

Is anyone else out there tired of all these “brands” that “design” bikes but don’t make anything? Oops, I mean, where are these frames made? Lolz

tumadre
tumadre
6 months ago
Reply to  Bubbrubb

designed AND made right here on planet earth…

Gabe
Gabe
6 months ago
Reply to  Bubbrubb

Is you cellphone made by the designers? Or even on the same continent? How about your clothing? Or half of your diet? esker is a passion driven company. Making really cool bikes at a reasonable cost. I happen to know they value domestic production/sourcing when possible and if customers would pay for it instead of moaning about supporting domestic labor that you would have more options to satisfy you.

James
James
6 months ago

Photographing the gap at the chainstay yoke is tricky because of the angle, so maybe I’m not seeing it right, but it looks like those tires are too big for that frame. It looks like the vent sprues are hitting the yoke. And that’s beyond not fitting.

r0b0tat0ms
r0b0tat0ms
6 months ago
Reply to  James

There isn’t a single shot where the rear tire clearance looks anywhere near acceptable… certainly wouldn’t meet US CPSC requirements for clearance if sold as shown (complete).

George
George
5 months ago
Reply to  r0b0tat0ms

I think that this tire size requires the sliding dropout to be all the way back, which it isn’t. I have a (steel) Japhy and the clearance difference with the dropouts forward vs. back is significant.