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New Trek Kovee XC Pedals Look to New SPD-Compatible Design: First Impressions Inside

The new pedal options cover everything from entry-level SPD-compatible, to a competitively priced composite body.

Trek Kovee Pedal Family Line
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Trek has redesigned its pedal line, and they have a very familiar Look. The new Kovee and Line clipless pedal family has been redesigned to fit Trek’s clipless offerings.

Trek Kovee Line Pedals
(All images / Jordan Villella unless noted)

What is it? Trek Pedals

The new Trek Kovee and Line pedals will be familiar to Look pedal users. The body shape, stack height, and width are nearly identical to the Look X-Track line of pedals, and that’s not a bad thing. Where the pedals diverge is the spindle and the bearings (and, I’m sure, other places), and they are SPD compatible.

Trek Kovee Pedal Family Line

Trek XC Kovee Pedals

The XC range offers three pedal configurations: Kovee Pro, Elite, and Comp. The Comp offering is the entry-level Kovee priced at $65.00 with a die-cast alloy pedal body. The Elite upgrades the pedal body from die-cast to a forged alloy with anodized plates for $105. The Pro is top-of-the-line for the Kovee XC pedals; the body is a lightweight composite body with knurling for added grip for $150.

Trek Line Pedals

Trek Line Trail Pedals

Trek’s new Line Pedal family aims at the trail, enduro, and downhill clipless crew. The Line pedals offer the same clipless feel as the Kovee, with a larger pedal platform. Like the Kovee line, they use the same SPD-compatible Look style cleats with a two-bolt pattern. The main difference in the Line pedals is the larger pedaling platform and added stability.

The Line family only has two offerings: Line Elite and Line Comp. The Line Elite pedal boasts a forged alloy body with some anti-slip machining on the surface, costing $120. The Line Comp has a die-cast alloy body with a less refined shape and is $75.

All pedals in the Kovee and Line offerings have the exact clipless mechanism. The Kovee and Line pedals have the same dual-sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles, cleats, and mounting hardware.

The mounting hardware is nearly identical to the Look X-track pedals, excluding the washer. The washer for the Kovee and Line pedals isn’t as shapely as the one from Look, but it doesn’t affect the pedal function.

No more Bontrager?

Trek seems to be quickly moving away from the Bontrager naming, and the pedal line is the latest to move to “Trek.” When will we see Trek wheels and Trek shoes? We’re guessing reasonably soon, especially considering the rate at Trek corporate bike shops are opening across North America. But we’ll have to wait and see…

Full Details — Trek Cross Country Pedals

Trek Kovee Pro Pedals weight

Kovee Pro

  • Dual-sided, SPD-compatible XC MTB clipless pedals
  • Fully adjustable clip in & clip out tension
  • Lightweight composite body with knurling for added grip
  • Dual sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles for smooth spinning durability
  • Actual Weight: 338g
  • Price: $150.00
Trek Kovee Elite Pedals weight

Kovee Elite

  • Dual-sided, SPD-compatible XC MTB clipless pedals
  • Fully adjustable clip in & clip out tension
  • Durable forged body with anodized plates for added durability
  • Dual sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles for smooth spinning durability
  • Actual Weight: 390g
  • Price: $105.00
Trek Kovee Comp Pedals weight

Kovee Comp

  • Dual-sided, SPD-compatible XC MTB clipless pedals
  • Fully adjustable clip in & clip out tension
  • Durable die cast aluminum body
  • Dual sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles for smooth spinning durability
  • Actual Weight: 384g
  • Price: $65.00

Full Details — Trek Trail Clipless Pedal

Trek Line Elite Pedal weight

Line Elite

  • Dual-sided SPD-compatible trail MTB clipless pedals
  • Fully adjustable clip in & clip out tension
  • Durable forged body with anodized plates for added durability and cage
  • The cage on trail pedals provides a platform for easily clipping in
  • Dual sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles for smooth spinning durability
  • Actual Weight: 451g
  • Price: $120.00
Trek Line pedals Comp weight

Line Comp

  • Dual-sided SPD-compatible trail MTB clipless pedals
  • Fully adjustable clip in & clip out tension
  • Durable die cast aluminum body & cage to protect against rock strikes
  • The cage on trail pedals provides a platform for easily clipping in
  • Dual sealed ball bearings with chromoly spindles for smooth spinning durability
  • Actual Weight: 432g
  • Price: $75.00
Photo: Michael van den Ham

First Ride Impressions

The Trek Kovee Pro pedals arrived just a few days ago, so we have limited time on them but some strong impressions. First, I was excited to see that the new Trek pedal line is similar to the Look X-Track. It makes sense… the Trek XC Factory Team rides Look, and the pedals are SPD compatible.

I switched to Look X-Tracks this season, and I’ve been thrilled with the Carbon Race Pedals.

The installation and setup are very straightforward. The pedals have a torque spec listed on the spindle and are a beefy 8mm fitting. The cleat install is similar to the Look pedals. The washer resembles a Shimano SPD design without the same sculpting as the Look cleat. This lack of curve doesn’t affect the installation at all.

The bearings are tighter than most pedals straight out of the box but will loosen up after a few rides. I chalked this tightness up to the updated seals and being fresh out of the box.

The pedals come in the lightest engagement setting and are lighter than most SPD for clipping in. I prefer a slightly tighter pedal engagement, and I immediately upped the tension. The Look and Trek style pedal has a softer and slightly easier time engaging, and upping the tension doesn’t augment the clip-in sensation.

Trek Kovee Line Pedals with tread
Photo: Michael van den Ham

While riding and performing cyclocross intervals, I forgot that I had changed my pedals. They were so similar to the Looks. When compared directly to the Look X-Track Race, the engagement, float, and stack height are right on the money.

Trek Kovee Line Pedals on rides
Photo: Michael van den Ham

My limited time on the Trek Kovee pedals has been excellent. The performance is solid; the weight is super competitive.

The Pros weigh 338g for the set, and the Look X-Track Race Carbon weighs 350g. The difference between the two is $5.00; the Look X-Track Race is $145.00, and the Trek Kovee Pros is $150.00.

Trek Kovee Line Pedals full pedal

No matter how you stack it, Trek has a competitive and effective pedal line with the new Kovee and Line family. The shape and clipless mechanism are dependable, the pricing is competitive, and it is SPD-compatible.

Stay tuned for a full review as we take the Trek Kovee Pro pedals through the remainder of the cyclocross season.

For more information, check out TrekBikes.com.

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Andrew
Andrew
6 months ago

I’d be curious as to how they handle mud. I’ve been riding SPDs for years, but just ordered a pair of HT M2 Pedals in hopes that they would shed mud better for CX use….the downside being that they aren’t SPD compatible- so if I like them I’ll have to swap pedals on multiple bikes.

Dave
Dave
6 months ago
Reply to  Andrew

I’ve gotten a few rides on the Kovee Pro (coming off XTR) and I can say they shed mud really well. Sunday was a muddy ride and I had zero issues getting in or out. I’ll be putting the Kovee’s on all bikes in my stable.

275C2217-B4E7-42F5-ADE7-68970DBFDDA9.jpeg
Will
Will
6 months ago
Reply to  Andrew

It may not be the same for these, but FWIW I swear the Looks actually seem to work better with Shimano cleats than the Look-supplied ones.

Andrew Groom
Andrew Groom
6 months ago

Interesting move away from Bontrager branding. Given that most riders closely associate Bontrager with Trek, I guess that the aftermarket sales of Bontrager branded products to non-Trek bike owners is relatively small. Therefore it makes sense for Trek to get their own name out there more. In my wildest dreams I wish that they would set their acquired brands free back into the non mainstream boutique world from whence they came. Make amazing modern geometry steel frames under the Bontrager name and modern hard tails with amazing paint under the Klein frame. I guess the Le Mond brand is unlikely to resurface under Trek, but how amazing and surprising (and unlikely!) would it be for Trek to nurture a couple of niche brands for the aficionados?!!

MatthewQC
MatthewQC
6 months ago
Reply to  Andrew Groom

Trek ended their partnership permanently with Lemond back in 2008. He’s making e-bikes on his own now.

Deputy Dawg
Deputy Dawg
6 months ago

How do they compare to XT pedals?

Whyarebikesoverpriced
Whyarebikesoverpriced
6 months ago

No power option? It’s a market that is ripe for taking..

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 months ago

Power pedals are terribly difficult to get right. And with power cranks/spiders being so cheap now, it doesn’t make much sense to make power pedals.
*I’m a power meter pedal user because I run oval chainrings and it’s the best way to get accurate data I’d otherwise prefer to have power meter spiders/cranks.

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