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Nox Composites Goes Hookless, Drops Rim Weights & Intros New Models

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Nox-Composites-Skyline-29er-carbon-rim-mountain-bike-wheel

Nox Composites has revamped their rim lineup, changing to hookless beads across the entire line and introducing two new models. They’re also expanding their hub and spoke build options, helping anyone find the right wheels for their budget or desires.

Cofounder Brad Stinson told us the hookless design came about because they wanted to reduce weak spots while still being able to build the rims as light as possible. Their design’s IP revolves around the seam placement, namely the seams between mold plates that press the carbon into shape. Because of the way the molds often go together, a lot of rims have a seam right at the top of the bead, which is a prime spot for delamination to occur. Others start out with a thicker “hookless’ bead then machine out the hook. With ours, we’re able to put the seam from the molds far away from the top of the rim wall, like under where the rim tape goes so it’s protected from rock strikes or other things hitting or rubbing on it. They’re calling it Rockguard HL, named because they surmise that most rim failures occur because of rocks striking a rim’s seam and starting the destructive delamination process.

That, plus new layup mix of materials and weaves, allowed them to develop a 345g Xc rim called Skyline with no compromises…

 

nox-composites-2015-rim-wheel-lineup

The Skyline will be available in 27.5″ and 29er sizes, with rim weights of just 335g (27.5″) and 345g (29er). That’s about 3040g lighter than the original XCR29 rims it replaces. Inside width is 23mm.

The Teocali is also brand new and sits between the Skyline and AM series, to be considered a “trail” rim. Measurements are in the middle, too, with weights of 350g (27.5″) and 380g (29er) and an interior width of 26mm.

For more aggressive riders, the Farlow replaces the AM series. The rims are using the same shape, it it takes advantage of the new layups. All three wheels also now use angled spoke drillings to help reduce unwanted stresses on the spokes. All rim weights are +/-10g.

Across the range, there are two new hubs available: DT Swiss 240’s and Project 321. Project 321 is the brand behind those purple anodized Thomson stems and Cannondale cranks, but they also make their own hubs. The internals share the Industy Nine Torch freehub system, but with different bearings. Full details on the hubs (and some of their colored parts) are here.

For those looking to save a bit of coin while still getting a great carbon rim, they’ll now build your wheels with Sapim Race spokes on Hope hubs to get a wheelset down to $1,428. It’s a bit heavier, with the Race spokes adding about 50g per wheel.

NoxComposites.com

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Tom
Tom
9 years ago

A rim weight drop of 3040g?! That’s quite and achievement and should increase performance a bit from the solid lead rim it replaces

Dodo
Dodo
9 years ago

I am so glad so many new product bow to fashion and don’t sell 26″ rims. My Ibis Mojo (the first model 2007) will last at least another decade (if not two) and I will never have the temptation to drop $1200-2000 to “upgrade” my wheel set!

Flip
Flip
9 years ago

@Dodo – It’s not fashion, just economics.

Ron G.
Ron G.
9 years ago

A hookless bead? The hook is on the rim; the bead is on the tire. You can have a hookless rim, or a beadless tire (syntactically, I’m not sure how it would work in reality), but I’d say a hookless bead is a non sequitur.

greg
greg
9 years ago

it’s a hookbeaded rimless.

Jinknobat
Jinknobat
9 years ago

@Dodo, I’m sure your mojo is a great bike, but at the shop I work at we couldn’t give away a mountain bike with 26″ wheels thats over $700.

dodo
dodo
9 years ago

Jinknobat, yes of course you cannot sell any. Marketing is very effective. We do not need different bar standards, or 10 speed, or 11 speed, or tapered head tube, or 27, 27+, 29, 29+ wheels but … there you go, suddenly is all you can buy, and what you has is “obsolete”.

But as I said I am glad of this particular “development”. Being on a “obsolete wheel size” is the best protection against succumbing to the marketing of “new” and “better” wheel sets costing an arm and a leg!

Jake
Jake
9 years ago

We don’t need air conditioning or air bags, or crumple zones in our cars either, but that doesn’t mean they don’t make cars better and safer…

dodo
dodo
9 years ago

Jake: the obvious implicit statement behind my comment is that those “improvements” do not make your bike better (heavier? yes).

craigsj
craigsj
9 years ago

“the obvious implicit statement behind my comment is that those “improvements” do not make your bike better (heavier? yes).”

Except that larger wheels do make a bike better. Heavier? So what?

The Mojo has been surpassed. Even Weagle doesn’t design suspensions like that anymore.

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

@dodo- Kudos for keeping your current bike. Our way of life creates a huge amount of pollution, and it’s good to see people who don’t upgrade to new stuff they don’t need every couple of years. May your current bike last many years, and may you enjoy many years of minty NOS replacement parts to keep it rolling.
But- the polluters, people who buy new stuff they don’t need, do have function on their side. at least usually. (You won’t find me riding a bike with a press-fit bottom bracket or internal cabling.) You don’t “need” 10 or 11 speeds, of course. But so what? Do you really buy a multi-$K bicycle based on the MINIMUM needed to go up and down some dirt hills? I am guessing that the answer is no. And I am guessing that rear suspension adds more weight than 650B wheels, too.
I remember riding with a friend on some local trails near Cincinnati. I was on my bike- 26″, 80mm travel up front, disc brakes front and rear, lightweight frame and rims, 3 by 8 drivetrain with 1995 Suntour thumbshifters (see, I am not against old stuff). My friend was on a cheap, heavy 29er with a heavy rigid fork, crummy rims and crummy rim brakes, balding tires and a 1 by 9 drivetrain. His bike was easily 5 pounds heavier than mine. I enjoy superior fitness, but he kicked my butt. I was behind him, panting and sprinting, adapting to minor features of the trail by standing and bobbing and weaving. I remember frequently looking ahead and being amazed by how my friend on his rigid bike was calmly seated, not really reacting to bumps or going around them and just spinning a low gear. Anecdotal evidence? Yes, but pretty strong evidence. Everything else- bike weight, quality of construction, suspension, brakes, even fitness- was on my side, but I still lost. 29 really is faster, in my view.

G
G
9 years ago

@Tim: Good anecdote nevertheless!

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

G, dodo- I also had clipless and was wearing extremely stiff shoes, while my friend had platform pedals and worn out sneakers.

feldy
feldy
9 years ago

Ok, I normally don’t comment on things like this, but the second paragraph, that appears to be pasted copy from the company reads like someone describe their, uh, “friend’s” embarrassing problem: [Pronount _emphasis_ added by me]

“… _Their_ design’s IP … Others start out with a thicker “hookless’ bead then machine out the hook. With _ours_, _we’re_ able to put the seam …. _They’re_ calling it Rockguard HL…”

dodo
dodo
9 years ago

Tim, yes, maybe. But it is anecdote. I regularly go biking with a friend of mine who has a 29″ hard tail, and when it come to uphill technical stuff (steps, rocks) or tight switchback I generally leave him well behind. Does it means that 26″ are better than 29″. No, One way or another these are just anecdotes.

Wheel size might be of importance for a professional racer, for the rest of us … doubt it.

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

Dodo- The difference between a hardtail 29er and a 26er FS bike is not going to be as drastic as the difference I was talking about. I had basically every advantage- my Fox fork vs. his rigid one; my ultra-rigid shoes and pedals compared to his flimsy ones; my disc brakes with fresh cables versus his old, worn out rims brakes squeezing dirty rims; my good tires versus his bad ones; my light bike versus his heavy one. There was one difference between us: he had bigger wheels. And he beat me. That’s an anecdote- but a strong one.
The effect of big wheels and of suspension is kind of similar: they both absorb bumps in different ways. So in effect, the suspension of an FS 26er does kind of the same thing as the big wheels of a hardtail 29er. In other words, the difference between your and your friend’s bike doesn’t sound nearly as big as the difference between mine and my friend’s bike. So your anecdote sounds weaker.
And if nothing makes a big difference in how fast we ride as you seem to imply, then why did you spend several thousand dollars on an FS bike? Is it possible you also fell victim to marketing when you bought that bike? Couldn’t a much cheaper bike have gotten you around the track almost as fast?

PsiSquared
PsiSquared
9 years ago

Anecdotal comparisons of different bikes ridden by different riders would be interesting if it told you anything objective about the bikes in question. Sadly, it doesn’t.

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

@Psi- so if I ride a rigid 26er with 1.9″ tires and cantilever up and down a bumpy, rock-strewn mountain trail and my friend of roughly similar weight, fitness, and body type rides the same trail on a 150mm travel 29er with 203mm discs, and I take 5 hours to ride it and come back with sore arms and legs, and he comes back feeling fine in two thirds the time, that doesn’t tell us anything? That’s an extreme example, but yes, experience (anecdotes) can have value, especially when one bike is heavily favored with every advantage but one, and the other bike has the reverse situation like was the case in my original example.

Jerry
Jerry
9 years ago

Dodo,

You opinions are way too typical of websites like this: grumpy person with gear from two years ago griping about how ‘the industry’ is trying to sell you stuff you don’t need.

Its true that you don’t need an awesome new bike to have fun on the trails. Everyone knows that. If you don’t think you need the newest gear, fine. Shut up and go ride. Don’t waste your time posting negative comments about products you’ve never tried. In case you haven’t noticed, the purpose of this website is to disseminate news, information, and reviews of new (and typically high end) bicycle equipment.

Nobody is forcing you to buy a 27.5 bike or fancy carbon wheels. If reading about those things pisses you off, stop reading.

If you really love your older bike (and the Mojo is a classic), great! Instead of griping, you should take advantage of the movement away from 26″ wheels and pick up older standard stuff for incredibly good prices. But regardless, please stop sh*tting on things that you don’t have any experience with. Nobody cares.

Mike
Mike
9 years ago

Tim, there’s also a thing in mountain biking called “technique” that effects taking 5 hours to ride a trail and coming back with sore arms and legs vs. feeling fine in two thirds the time. Your anecdote really tells us nothing, at least without you two trading bikes and doing a second ride.

As for Nox, I love seeing what new fancy stickers these American companies manage to put on Chinese rims.

craigsj
craigsj
9 years ago

“As for Nox, I love seeing what new fancy stickers these American companies manage to put on Chinese rims.”

What are you implying here, Mike? You think the stickers are the extent of their engineering contribution?

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