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Omata One dials up gorgeous analog speedometer in a purely modern GPS cycling computer

omata analog speedometer gps cycling computer
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Developed with Seiko by a team that includes former Nokia product designers and Fabian Cancellara as an advisor, the Omata One analog cycling computer blends the best of what’s new with a classic interface. Much like driving a classic car or a desirable watch, there is something satisfying about a beautifully designed analog gauge. If you’ve ever looked down at your digital cycling computer and wished for something a little more along those lines, you may want to check out the new Omata One.

The GPS, ANT+ and Bluetooth 4.0 equipped head unit captures all of the important data to fill in your Strava profile, but only displays speed, distance, ascent and ride time. All of the data is shown through analog needles on its watch-like face, keeping it simple to read at a quick glance…

omata analog speedometer gps cycling computer

The concept behind the Omata One is simple – provide everything you need during the ride in an easy to read analog format. That means you’ll have access to your current speed, distance traveled, total ascent, and of course, time.

The face is available in your choice of miles/miles-per-hour or kilometers/km-per-hour, and your choice of gray or white. The larger red needle shows your speed on the larger numerals inset from the smaller numbers that show cumulative distance via the thinner needle. Contrasting colors should make everything easily legible at a quick glance.

Worried about your KOMs? Don’t be – the One also includes a 72 channel GPS engine that will record your ride just like any other GPS unit. The difference is that it doesn’t include any of the onboard GPS features you’ll find on other cycling computers. If speed, distance, ascent, and time are the only things you really care about on your ride, then you’ll find nothing missing from the One.

omata analog speedometer gps cycling computer

omata-analog-speedometer-cycling-computer-5 omata-analog-speedometer-cycling-computer-6

omata analog speedometer gps cycling computer specs omata analog speedometer gps cycling computer

The secret is in the digital GPS mechanism co-developed with Seiko which converts the GPS data into precision analog movement with a high degree of accuracy. Listed specs have it adding 97g to the total weight of your bike while the rechargeable battery should give you around 24 hours of continuous use.

The Omata One launched on Kickstarter today, with delivery anticipated for February 2017. Pricing starts at $500 for a single GPS unit, and quantities are limited and already selling fast, so act quickly if you want to get in on this first production run.

Omata.com

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41 Comments
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Durianrider's son
Durianrider's son
6 years ago

Where is power????

Frippolini
Frippolini
6 years ago

Looks fantastic! Very nice. 🙂

Just as an idea, why not add a couple of LEDs to it to make it even more functional?

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
6 years ago

$500 and no cadence, but you can read speeds up to 110KPH. What a device!

Tersicore
Tersicore
6 years ago

500 bucks just to impress your riding buddies. It’s pretty cool,but I don’t know why they call it easy to read. Nothing is quicker than a digital watch screen when you need to access infos at a glance. And when I’m flying down a mountain at 80km/h I just need to glance,not chasing hands on a dial…

dante
dante
6 years ago

$500.

Don Branscom
Don Branscom
3 years ago
Reply to  dante

Many others for less than $100.00

TheFunkyMonkey
TheFunkyMonkey
6 years ago

That’s a step backwards…

J
J
6 years ago

Wow I am jealous of the people who can spend $500 on what amounts to a few ounces of plastic.

Collin
Collin
6 years ago
Reply to  J

Isn’t this a 4 days late?

Theendinfrench
Theendinfrench
6 years ago

Surely they’ve misunderstood their market a little… Riders who will happily drop $500 on a beautiful computer are gonna be rocking a power meter (or at least a cadence sensor)…
I think i’ll wait for v2

Fiddle
Fiddle
6 years ago

I like the idea and motivation behind this, and it’s pretty cool Spartacus is involved, but $500 is a big ask.

wheelz
wheelz
6 years ago

A bit gimmicky perhaps, but for some reason I really want one. This displays everything I care about in a ride.

SNIPE-HUNTER
SNIPE-HUNTER
6 years ago

Compare this to other expenses, eg. fancy watches, tubular tires, car tires, insurance, hair cuts, and you’ll soon see that $500 for a finely crafted piece of awesome is cheap. I love that there are people who will gladly spend $400 on a Garmin, then balk at the idea of the $50 mount; so weird. I think it’s cool, because people who buy this know that they don’t need a power meter, and maybe they like nice watches.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

I don’t see keeping it analog keeps it “simple to read at a glance”. Looks fancy, but when you are displaying 4 pieces of data on a small face, digital offers better functionality.

Ryan S
Ryan S
6 years ago

I absolutely love this and feel I am not alone. I can’t stand digital gauges and vastly prefer analog; it’s just how my brain is wired. The price tag, even if deserved (and I appreciate quality and understand the price it often commands), puts it well out of reach for me. Also, since 98% of my riding is on rough, technical singletrack, I have no need for such a device. However, if I was a roadie, and despite the price being well beyond my budget/reach, I would likely end up getting one even if it meant pooling my birthday, Christmas, and secret beer money.

postophetero
postophetero
6 years ago

…water resistant to 50m?

kbark
kbark
6 years ago

A scaled down version that just had speed and distance traveled would be nice, and hopefully affordable for the poors.

Spokey
Spokey
6 years ago

I dig it. I think analog is much easier to read, especially for speed (acceleration and deceleration). I agree that “more features” doesn’t necessarily equate to better. For me, cycling is a pursuit of simplicity. In the world of $450 floor pumps and $520 bib shorts, $500 for a made-in-Finland analog device is not out of bounds

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago
Reply to  Spokey

I agree that analog is easy to decipher for acceleration and deceleration in something like a car and allows one a peripheral glance at approximate speed (although I do have 1 car with an amazingly good digital layout that kind of changed my view on this).
But is that a useful thing in a human powered device? Honest question. Do you look at it sprinting and say, whoa whoa whoa, I am accelerating way too fast, better hold up! Or do you see the speed needle in your periphery and decide your going to slow/fast?

I think it looks incredibly nice. That alone is all that is needed if you have the $500 and the desire. But functionally, I don’t see it for a bicycle.

Spokey
Spokey
6 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

Acceleration on descents is what I was thinking mainly

Griffen
6 years ago

I was all for it and all until I reached the end of the post and saw the $500 price tag. I mean, it’s well designed but it just lacks the competitive advantage to command such a high price.

Don Branscom
Don Branscom
3 years ago
Reply to  Griffen

I saw this for sale on another website for $369.00 Auto meter I think.

JPHcross
JPHcross
6 years ago

I would be on board if the price compared to a Polar 450 or Garmin Edge 25.
Prefer average speed over ascent though.
Love the aesthetic.

Iceman
Iceman
6 years ago

So let’s get this straight $40 for decals, cap, junk email, and a thanks! , and for only $500 and almost a years wait I get a a cool looking clock and speedometer, which does the same job as a $30 cateye computer. Kickstarter campaigns are become an easy way to scam consumers.

jbt
jbt
6 years ago

I understand the allure of this, it’s got a very narrow consumer segment that it caters to. When I first heard about this months ago, my initial thought was that I would buy it. Unfortunately, I’m not apt to wait a year for this, by that time the bike industry and myself will have moved on in general. By that point, the conversation won’t be about disc brakes, it’ll be about $250 power meters, road suspension, etc. You get my point. I think this is a cool product, for a narrow window and frankly my concern is that this won’t be able to be a long term going concern. I.e. One year is a heck of a lot of time to wait for a product. It’s an eternity – this coming from a guy who’s in VC and has seen tons of more complicated things delivered to market in less time, albeit in other (better funded) industries. I just hope that the folks who buy this don’t immediately find themselves without support 24 months from now. I wish them well and hope that the Kickstarter keeps them solvent for a very long time.

Tyler
Tyler
6 years ago

Love it! I was just thinking the other day how nice it would be to have something like this but able to be customized. So it would be a digital display that acted like an analog display. Then you could say put power on the very outside which would be programmed to your power zones. Now when you are wanting to be in a certain zone you just stick the needle in that zone and stay there. Would be very cool.

Drew (@IrrelevantD)
6 years ago

I’m absolutely baffled by this one. $500, there is no minute hand, so you have to guess at what fraction of hours you’ve been riding. No time of day (guess I’ll need an actual watch for that). The distance only goes up to 100k, so assuming it wraps around, going to have to do some math in my head if I’m doing a 80 or 100mi ride.

So, basically, this is like 1/4 the functionality of a Garmin Edge 20 (the cheapest version) for almost 4x the cost?

Sorry, I’m just not hipster enough for this one.

Kaycee
Kaycee
6 years ago

I like the concept of an analog speedometer. The position of the arrow gives context; whereas two numbers on a screen is somewhat abstract. At any rate, the execution here is needlessly complicated. I have no idea what I’m supposed to be looking at. They would have been better off with analog speed information and digital everything else.

CC
CC
6 years ago
Reply to  Kaycee

In 2010 redfish developed a better concept, but stopped there. http://redfish.ee/projects/bicycle-speedometer/

Yagil Henkin
Yagil Henkin
6 years ago

With this price they should have put the Rolex name on it.

Brian S
Brian S
6 years ago

So pimp

jared
jared
6 years ago

You guys are a few days late for an April fools joke?

Butter
Butter
6 years ago

Your $30 cateye logs GPS? Send me one!

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
6 years ago

nice wish bell@ross would make a version

SMW
SMW
6 years ago

you can buy something similar on asian importer for $15- it may not last long- but I’m sure you can spend another 15 bucks or two or three instead of $500

Mike B.
Mike B.
6 years ago

If they put the name “Rapha” on it, people would be climbing over themselves to pay $1,000 for it.

jim
jim
6 years ago

Nope I’m holding out for the mechanical odometer

Allan
Allan
6 years ago

This is the ultimate show off piece at the coffee shop, but that’s about it. Analog gauge, harder to read, longer to process the information, hilarious price, very little variety of information. Also agree with the commenter above who said guys who can afford a $500 toy like this will also have a power meter, and will want to see that info. Definitely neat looking, but hardly practical.

Jess
Jess
6 years ago

When I originally heard about this product, I thought it would cost maybe $100-200 tops. Talk about perceived value. Yeesh.

cjlee9
6 years ago

Nice but at $500 this is def for the ones with money to burn.

ok1
ok1
6 years ago

Very elegant, like it.
Should be able to software adjust the dial functions tbh, ascent is something I never bother with.
And the weight is a bit much for that money. cheaper lighter version without the ant and Bluetooth etc would be nice to see, or keep the Bluetooth and remove the GPS.
We all carry phones for safety, they have GPS. We use heart sensor bands etc, they use GPS too.
Dont see the need in slapping it all in there.

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