Is the Paul Klamper mechanical disc brake worth the hype? How does the Growtac Equal compare?

A little over a month ago, I reviewed the Growtac Equal cable-actuated brakes. It wasn’t long after it was published, that the comment section lit up with brake-type allegiance. Readers seemed to be either in favor of, or very much against the cable-actuated disc brake as a whole – with little to no gray area. Ok.

I appreciate that kind of engagement and thank those of you for reading the review and taking the time to comment… it was colorful and entertaining, to say the least.

In that Growtac review, I promised I’d review and compare another high-end, cable-actuated disc brake, the Klamper, by Paul Components.

I’m here to deliver on that promise.

Paul Klamper fork close up

Paul Klamper close-up.

Cable-actuated disc brakes… well, geez, it seems some cyclists get pretty riled up about ’em. I get it, to an extent. Look, I’ve ridden both types of brakes, hydraulic and cable-actuated, off and on for over two decades. There have been horrible and stellar versions of both.

For the most part, I think that the bicycle hydraulic brake system adds unnecessary complications to a fairly simple procedure, which is to simply press brake pads against a rotor.

But I digress…

The Klamper by Paul Components

The Klamper is made in the US of A in Chico, California. It is completely rebuildable and serviceable –and it is a machined thing of beauty.

Paul Klamper rear close up with pads

Paul Klamper rear

I tested the flat mount, short pull version of the Klampers and mounted them on my Masi Speciale Randonneur Elite. After taking the slim and small Growtac Equals off and mounting the Klampers, admittedly they looked a little “bulky” at first…

I quickly got used to the look of the caliper, however, because I actually really like the bulky look of the brake. To me, it looks strong, utilitarian, and purpose-built. I Dig it.

Klamoers on the Masi in Oregon

The Masi and Klampers in Oregon… the purple “poppin’ through the spokes.”

Remember, this is the same bike that I used for the Growtac Equal review. I am using the same exact rotors and cables as well. Trying hard to keep it “apples to apples”.

Paul Klamper review

Photo c. D. Woolley. Klampers, on the go!

Paul Klamper Brake Set-up

Upon removing the Equals from the Masi, I decided to use the same compressionless housing that was used when running the Equal brakes. There was no need for any adjustment in length between the two, so that was sweet.

Paul at Paul Components actually recommends using regular brake housing with the Klampers, but, as mentioned earlier, I wanted the comparison to the Equal brakes to be as close to “apples to apples” as possible.

Let me just say that right out of the gate, the versatility of being able to effortlessly swap out the brakes on my Masi (or any bike for that matter) is an incredibly strong argument FOR the cable-actuated disc brake. Swapping the brakes was super convenient, no cutting hydraulic hosing, no olives, no pounding barbs, no mineral oil, no filling or bleeding, no dumb syringes and bleed cups, no mess, and zero “clean-up”.

Paul Klamper close up in hand

Paul Klamper’s interchangeable actuating arms. the machined “SP” stands for “short pull”. It will have “LP” on the “long pull” version.

The actuating arm on the Klampers are interchangeable and can be swapped out. So, changing your brakes from a long pull version, that works with modern MTB brake levers, to a short pull version, working with standard drop bar levers/brifters or cantilever brake levers adds to the total versatility of the Paul Klamper.

Klamper instructions

Detailed instructions from the folks at Paul Components

Included with the Klampers are the pads and the mounting hardware as well as concise instructions and an exploded view of the brakes with labels for what all the parts are called.

After installing the pads in the caliper, I then mounted the calipers to the frame, but only finger-tight. After that, I turned the inside and outside pad adjustment wheels to where they just barely touched the rotor, and then tightened the caliper to the frame.

Paul Klamper close up rear

Paul Klamper Flat mount version.

After running the new cable and getting the brakes set up, the front operated perfectly and had a great lever feel. The rear, however, felt sluggish at the beginning of the actuator throw when initially pulling the rear lever. It felt like a little dead spot, that held slightly, and would eventually “let go” as you squeezed the lever more. It sounds bad how I’m describing it, it wasn’t all that bad and was very, very subtle… but still didn’t feel great and, for me, needed to be addressed prior to using the brakes.

So I loosened the cable at the caliper and started again. I opened the pistons all the way with the adjustment wheels, loosened the caliper, and slid it slightly outboard, making the rotor a smidge off-center. Now, with the rotor biased slightly inboard in the caliper, almost touching the stationary pad, I tightened the caliper back to the frame again.

I found that this was an easy way to “dial out” that feeling of a “dead spot”. Also, doing this is a great way to maximize the amount of power you can get from the brake.

The issue was addressed, the rear lever now felt as snappy as the front. Let’s ride!

How’d they Klamp?

Paul Klampers in Oregon

Klampers in Oregon…it was drizzling before the skies opened up.

I installed them and did the initial 2 rides (30 miles total) right before I left for an event in Oregon. They weren’t stopping really great and were a bit noisy. I wasn’t really concerned about this, as there is always a pad break-in period for all disc brakes, plus the instructions from Paul Components mentioned 3-4 rides before the pads “bed in”. OK, let’s wait and see.

The Klampers in Oregon

Photo c. J. Cobbs. In Oregon, Before the skies opened up…

The second ride of the Oregon trip (the fourth ride for the Klampers) found us finishing the last 13 miles of the ride in a total Pacific Northwest downpour. When the brakes were dry, they were just a little noisy but when applying the brakes after they were soaked with water, the amount and volume of the Klamper’s brake noise was insane… but, I wasn’t alone in the noise. I was on the ride with 5-6 other cyclists and everyone’s brakes were howlin’ really bad …we sounded like a pack of wolves when slowing down for the corners. It went on like that until we got back to the house.

Klampers and singletrack

Photo c. J. Cobbs. Some singletrack in Oregon…still dry for a bit longer.

Remember, this wet ride was only the fourth ride for the brakes. And never once in Oregon did the brakes feel like they weren’t going to stop me… even during the downpour.

Paul Klamper at the beach

Paul Klampers at the beach… no rain here. 🙂

After I got home and went out for a ride, I expected the braking noise that I got on the Oregon trip, but noticed that the Klampers were totally quiet. Not only were they quiet, but they felt amazing. They had remained quiet for that entire 60-ish mile ride. I mean, wow! At this point, with only 4 rides (90-ish miles or so), with some rain, the pads seemed to be bedded leaving the brakes feeling absolutely amazing.

Paul Klampers Review

Klampers on the Fence shot.

It was time to just start putting miles on the brakes. I took the bike to all of the spots and rides that I rode the Growtac Equals. I did a lot more trail riding and underbiking with the Klampers. They just felt so strong and powerful.

Klampers in the weeds

Photo c. D. Woolley. Paul Klampers So. Cal singletrack

The Klampers feel so good that I can safely state that I feel they are on par with hydraulic brakes.

I know that’s bold, and I can hear all of the typing already. But, it’s how I feel. The hydro’s brake lever feel is a bit more effortless when pulling it, but just barely. I do feel a little finger/hand fatigue, as well as a little forearm pump on longer, more technical dirt trail descents. But in the Klamper’s defense, I was squeezing them tighter and more often than I would if I wasn’t reviewing brakes.

The power of these brakes is pretty incredible and is on tap, whenever you need it. If there is any difference in the power of hydro vs the Klamper, it is minuscule and, to me, not worth the added hassle, the limited versatility, and the inability for trailside repairs or caliper serviceability of the hydro system.

Now, let’s talk about modulation… the one disc brake feature we all hang our hats on. I noticed that the modulation of the brakes while off-road, was really impressive. Hands-down the best of any cable-actuated brake I’ve ever ridden.

That sounds dramatic, I know. But I stand by it. The modulation is there with the Paul Klampers. Period.

While going into the off-camber corners and slowly crawling down steep rutted trail descents, I was able to accurately control the amount of pressure applied directly to the rotor. I felt that the amount of lever pulled was duplicated exactly to the amount of pressure put on the rotor, allowing me to properly “feather the brakes”.

Which, I believe is the actual definition of brake modulation. Eh?

Road descents felt equally confidence-inspiring. The Klampers suffered no fading or glazing on the descents I did. The power and ability to slow me down from high speeds was, again confidence-inspiring, allowing me to feel comfortable going even faster if I needed to.

Remember kids, a great brake can actually help you go faster.

Paul Klampers in So. Cal

Photo c. D. Woolley. More So. Cal singletrack on the Klampers..poppin’ purple bling.

In Conclusion

I have approximately 500+ miles on the Klampers, and they have proven themselves to be pretty damn remarkable!

It is this cyclist’s opinion, that after riding hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes, in one form or another for the better part of two decades, I believe that Paul Components’ Klamper mechanical disc brakes are better than hydraulic disc brakes. And, I think they are hands down the best mechanical disc brake I’ve ever tried.

The initial set-up of the brakes took a bit of effort, but once the pads were bedded, it’s been smooth sailing. Or, should I say awesome stopping? The instructions said to take 3-4 good rides to bed the pads, and it took just that. Maintenance has been easy with the occasional turn of the outboard pad adjustment wheel… no big whoop.

I would recommend this brake to everyone.

It’s the best cable-actuated brake I have ever ridden.

Sure, it’s pricey. But are you comparing the price to other small, USA-made component companies? Usually not. These brakes are hand-made and are not mass-produced. And also keep in mind, that with these cable-actuated brakes, you won’t need to spend money on all of the extra doodads you need to maintain a hydraulic brake system or keep buying mineral oil.

Plus when buying the Paul Components Klampers, you are supporting small, independent American manufacturing, and you have to put a value on that. Right? Right.

Klampers in Oregon

Photo c. J. Cobbs. Oregon, coffee run.

Earlier in this review, I mentioned that all of my personal bikes are pulling cable to stop, and two out of the three are using Paul Klampers, that’s how much I like these brakes. As a matter of fact, look for the review on the pair that’s on my mountain bike coming soon. For that review, I am running them in a configuration that is a little different. So stay tuned!

Paul Klamper Brakes vs. Growtac Equal Brakes

Ok, here we go. I am going to keep this simple, non-scientific, and very understandable.

The following is a reflection of my experiences with these two high-end cable-actuated brake systems.

First, let me start by saying that I did end up putting more “real-life” miles on the Klampers and more “intentional” miles on the Equals. That wasn’t purposeful, it just happened that way.

Aesthetics

At the end of the day, I do like the robust aesthetics of the Klampers over the Equals. I did like the size of the Equal caliper body and the placement of the actuator arm (on the top as opposed to the side) is very attractive. Its smaller size allowed the Equal caliper to “tuck” into the chainstay. Again, personal preference.

The actual fit and finish are very good on both brakes. The visible “machine-marks” of the Equal caliper aren’t my jam, but for others, it may be. I prefer the smooth “finished” look of the Klamper caliper.

How They Performed

The performance of the Equal and the Klampers are very similar. They’re both incredibly strong brakes, the strongest I’ve ever ridden. But, the Equals strength-to-lever feel always felt either on or off.  The Equal’s lever feel, although really snappy, had a very “soul-less” feel to them… almost robotic. You could squeeze the lever and actuate the brakes, but couldn’t “feel” the brakes if that makes sense.

The Klampers felt stronger than the Equals, with a more “usable” strength. When it came to strength-to-lever feel, the Klamper felt as snappy but had more of an organic feel when squeezing the lever, allowing you to “feel” the brake when braking. I liked the way this felt, a lot more than the Equals.

This leads me to modulation. The Klampers were hands down the winners in this arena as well. The Equal brake, as mentioned above, felt very on or off during my use. The Klampers were close to, or as good as hydraulic brake modulation.  I have never felt a cable-actuated brake modulate as well as the Klamper.

What they Weigh

The Equal brake caliper weighs in at 137grams with the pads installed. The Klamper weighs in at 211grams with the pads installed. So you’re looking at 148g more for the pair of Klampers.

The Klamper’s little extra weight could be coming in the form of needle bearings for the thrust bearing, and a heat-treated steel actuator arm piston, and pad piston as well as two “tool-free” pad adjustment wheels.

Set-Up

The Equal brakes were a little easier to set up, there were a lot more steps to the set-up, but it was painless and came with really good instructions. It resulted in great braking results immediately after installation with a short (2-ride) pad bedding.

The Klampers needed a bit more attention and finesse in their setup, with a longer pad bedding time. But, again the results I got from the Klampers were worth the extra work and time put in, resulting in better overall performance than the Equal brakes.

The Klamper wins in the “on-the-fly” pad adjustment category by offering inboard and outboard, easy-to-turn brake pad adjustment wheels. You need a tool to adjust the Equal’s pads.

Where They’re Made

The Growtac Equals are designed and manufactured in Japan. The Paul Component Klampers are designed and manufactured in Chico, California.

Versatility

Both the Klampers and Equals come in flat mount or post mount/IS. The Klampers however, come in short pull, long pull, and Campy pull versions. This is done with the interchangeable actuating arm. The Equals, as of this writing, come in short pull only.

The Equal brakes firmly state that for best results, use compressionless housing, whereas the Klampers suggest regular housing but can work very well with either type of housing. Also, the pads that the Klampers come with are the most common type of brake pad and are available everywhere.

What’s the Cost and What’s Included

The Equals retail for $350. That price buys you everything you need to set up your brakes on your bike minus rotors:

  • Two calipers
  • 2x road and MTB cables
  • A flat mount adaptor
  • 2x compressionless housing
  • 2x non-compressionless housing
  • Mounting hardware

The Klampers retail for $245 ($315 for the high polished finish) and are sold per wheel. So, that price buys you:

  • one caliper
  • Kool stop Avid Elixer pads
  •  mounting hardware
  • USA Made

Comparison Final Thoughts

This is a little tougher than I thought. I like both of these brakes, a lot. But if we are using the feel and strength of the hydraulic disc brake system as the benchmark for both power and modulation, which we are, then the Paul Components Klamper is the hands-down winner of the comparison, matching the hydro system in both strength and modulation.

With the Growtac Equal brakes, you get a very strong brake with a lighter caliper. They are at a lower initial cost and come with everything you need to set your bike up with a very capable disc brake set. And they are made in Japan.

With the Paul Klamper brakes, you get a category leader in both braking strength, modulation, serviceability, and finish. The USA-made brakes, in my opinion, on par with or better than hydraulic disc brakes and, by far worth the money.

That’s it.

Check out all of the hand-made goodness from Chico, California by clicking on the link below.

PaulComp.com

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Cyclekrieg
Cyclekrieg
16 days ago

Whenever I read reviews where people talk about how good the Paul Klampers are, I know I’m reading a review with someone that either has never rode TRP Spyre/Spyke brakes or didn’t have them setup properly.

Paddy H
Paddy H
16 days ago
Reply to  Cyclekrieg

Whenever I hear someone defend TRP Spyre’s I become saddened, knowing that they haven’t yet tried JuinTechs.

jonathan
jonathan
13 days ago
Reply to  Paddy H

Whenever I see someone singing praises of the JuinTech/Yoko brakes I hang my head in sorrow, knowing full well they have never tasted the greatness of a TRP Hy/RD set up with Shimano sp41 cables and housing.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
12 days ago
Reply to  jonathan

Whenever I hear someone genuflecting to the altar of the TRP Hy/RD w/ SP41 housing I grieve for the fact they’ve never had their hands blessed by the sweet bulbousy caress of of the Shimano RS405 hydraulic levers and calipers.

Daniel Torres
Daniel Torres
4 days ago

Whenever I read debates about cable vs hydraulic brakes I laugh as I whip skid my fixie bombing down a hill with no brakes or helmet squeezing in between cars while I blow through a red light.

nooner
nooner
16 days ago

A wordy review indeed but perhaps missing the crux.. Are these cable pull brakes old school technology where only one pad side moves and the other pad is fixed or stationary? If so, hey they may be good enough if you only ride to the beer store, I certainly wouldn’t be taking them down any canyon side trails in Laguna… http://www.bengalperformance.com.tw/mechanical-product-pistory.htm

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  nooner

Why do you think dual pad actuation is inherently superior?

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  nooner

Five of the six brakes that company makes are single piston. Their trade name for single piston is PSP, for peak stopping power.

Tim
Tim
16 days ago

I think another point worth mentioning is that Klampers and Equals are very different brakes (I own both). The Klamper is an absolute beast that has enough rigidity, power and heat-absorbing mass to be confidently used for enduro, whereas the Equal calipers are pared down to the absolute minimum- weight is scalloped away from the already rather small caliper, and even smaller brake pads are used. Growtac’s PDF on their brakes states that trail is pretty much the most extreme use for these brakes.

Tim
Tim
16 days ago

I switched to Klampers from a pair of (admittedly pretty old and clapped out) Shimano Zees. For several months, I hesitated about replacing the Zees with Klampers- part of me had started to believe the absolutely dominant online opinion that cable brakes don’t and indeed never can be anywhere as good as hydros.
That part of me was wrong. I finally installed the Klampers with metal pads, Yokozuna compressionless housing, 203mm rotors and M900 (first gen) XTR levers with Servo Wave. The power was for me personally just plain excessive; I couldn’t handle it. It was no different than a Servo Wave-equipped Shimano hydro- some love it, some can’t handle it. Trials bike, cargo bike, e-bike, tandem, heavy rider- yes. Me- no. I switched back to less powerful levers (Altek Shark Tooth) and will tinker with other levers to find the ones I like best. That’s another advantage of cable brakes- being able to choose between a wide variety of levers!
My Klampers are also smooth, only a tiny bit less so than a good hydraulic brake. My next small upgrade will be Middleburn cable oilers, which let you squirt fresh lube into your housings. Modulation is great.

Greg
Greg
16 days ago
Reply to  Tim

Which lever arm did you use on the Klampers with the m900 levers?

Tim
Tim
15 days ago
Reply to  Greg

Short. If you need to tune the power down somewhat, consider 160 rotors. Setting the pads super close so that the cam isn’t fully engaged doesn’t help much.
Another minus of M900 levers is that bends or warping in the rotor make the brakes pulse very noticeable.
A plus of M900s is that the increased leverage helps overcome any friction in the cable, giving a very, very smooth feel.
I’ll be experimenting with lots of levers, both short and long pull, to see what gives me the best result.

dr sweets
dr sweets
16 days ago

Hardtail Party raves about Klampers and has had no concerns taking them down the sketchiest double black trails. I, like yourself was an early adopter of disc brakes and have ran them since ’99 on all of my mountain bikes. However, I’ve yet to ride a pair of cable disc brakes that had anything close to the power and modulation of hydraulics. My current rides have Codes with HS2 rotors and Hayes Dominion A4s on my hardtail and full suspension respectively. Your review and others have me curious though about the Klampers and those polished ones are dope.

Tim
Tim
16 days ago
Reply to  dr sweets

Tastes and perceptions are different- but for the most part hydros do work a lot better than cable discs. A big part of that is that cable disc calipers are cheap and low quality, and paired with resin pads, 160mm rotors, crummy levers and cheap, poorly cut cables and housing. Upgrade all of that to good stuff and the performance gap narrows a lot.
That said… few brakes of any type are going to compete with Dominions.

Mike S.
Mike S.
16 days ago

Ron, I think it depends on the bike and the application. On a bike like your Masi, cable discs are great. But on big tire bikes, 2.6″ or bigger, or on really technical terrain hydraulic discs reign supreme I thought about upgrading to Klampers on my Rabbit Fighter from the Campy levers/Spyres I’ve been using but ended up going with SRAM S700 2×10 drop bar shifters. I have a set on my Fitz that runs 29 x 2.25 tires and I love the lever feel and control on techy dirt descents.

I love supporting Paul Comp but on certain bikes hydraulics are the optimal choice.

Ken
Ken
16 days ago

Would you do a comparison of these 2 with the TRP Spyre SLC flat mount?

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Ken

Not to mention the old standby BB7.

DaveS
DaveS
16 days ago

With a review like this, the interaction between the disc and the pads has to be considered. According to the, admittedly hideously dishonest bike industry, the break in period for disc brakes deposits a micro film of pad material onto the rotor. This improves braking enormously and aids with making them quiet. I suspect that your long wet ride had the effect of cleaning the previous pad material from the rotors and allowing deposition of the pad material from the Klampers. Perhaps such reviews really need brand new rotors each time.

jonathan
jonathan
13 days ago
Reply to  DaveS

I thought that as I read… the “apples to apples” was actually doing a disservice to the review. New rotors = new pads, if you want to see them at their peak performance. If it hadn’t been yoko housing I would have wanted fresh housing as well.

Jason
Jason
16 days ago

Thank you for the great comparison!
However, you have to bear in mind that the Klampers are very clunky, bulky and wide – and that some of them run the risk (chainstay length…) of touching the brake with the rear foot when pedalling.

RampantHaddock
RampantHaddock
15 days ago

Let me just say that right out of the gate, the versatility of being able to effortlessly swap out the brakes on my Masi (or any bike for that matter) is an incredibly strong argument FOR the cable-actuated disc brake.”

Yea, cos we’re all doing that, all the time.

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  RampantHaddock

I agree, this is not a strong argument unless you’re a YouTuber switching setups all the time or just a compulsive tinkerer.

The Dordogne Cyclist
The Dordogne Cyclist
15 days ago

I have used TRP Spyre, Hybrid, Juin Tech, all average to poor. Juin Tech were good brakes for a while but the seals blew and that was the end of them. I am now running a set of Klampers 8,600 miles and Growtac 560 miles on two Gravel bikes. The performance of both the Klampers and the Growtac are like night and day to everything before. I would agree with the review that the Klampers just have the edge but the Growtac are pretty fine. I have had no issues setting up either brake. I have had the Klampers apart and re built and they are super well made and easy to service. No need for hydraulic

Tim
Tim
15 days ago

Which levers have you used with the Klampers and the Equals?

Andy Guy
Andy Guy
15 days ago

Hey, great review. What is that front rack you’re running? Looks sweet and would work on my bike I think, running a salsa firestarter fork and looking for a suitable rack.

Jim777
Jim777
15 days ago

One thing stood out for me above everything else which was that you said that “being able to effortlessly swap out the brakes on my Masi (or any bike for that matter) is an incredibly strong argument FOR the cable-actuated disc brake.” To promote that as such a great feature tells me that there really isn’t any good argument for expensive cable disc brakes, you might as well say that we should all be using single speed bikes, rather than have the hassle of changing derailleurs and maintaining them (plus your chains and sprockets will last forever). No, most people don’t change their brakes, or if they do, it will be a one off (or a straight swap if one becomes faulty). And if the work is a hassle for anybody, just take it to your local bike shop, it will still be far cheaper to get a reasonable hydraulic system fitted. As for touring in remote places, unless it’s a really long tour in remote places, if one brake is broken, you still have another, so for most people the remote places argument isn’t applicable.

jonathan
jonathan
13 days ago
Reply to  Jim777

that may be the case, but brakes need to be serviced from time to time; and for a hydraulic brakeset that means bringing into a shop for most people, but it’s a little more accessible to swap some some cables and housing.

Tom
Tom
10 days ago
Reply to  jonathan

Time to time for me being 6 years on a set of Deore hydraulics. Bike is ridden every single day. Only changed the pads, thats it.

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Jim777

I very strongly prefer two brakes to one.

Dirt McGirt
Dirt McGirt
15 days ago

Sitting here watching all the home “mechanics” that can’t set up mechanicals bitch about performance…..

Tim
Tim
14 days ago
Reply to  Dirt McGirt

And people comparing fresh hydros with 203mm rotors, metal pads and Servo Wave to cheap, worn out cable brakes with 160mm rotors, resin pads, plain levers, and cheap, poorly cut housing.
And worse! People whose hydros’ levers pull almost all the way to the bar because they haven’t been bled, and/ or feel totally sticky for some unknown reason. And then they say how cable brakes don’t work. Right.

Bergsteiger
Bergsteiger
15 days ago

One other bonus of mechanical brakes is for adventure lev l bikes where they will see poor conditions. I have a theory where is mud/sand/rough conditions mechanical brakes will keep the pads out of the way. Hydraulic brakes auto adjust, so the pads advance into oblivion faster.
Pretty small sample size but the few people that I have talked to and myself have years on pads in upper peninsula Michigan conditions, where others with hydros have burned through pads in one or two events.
I get lots of flack from some folks I mentioned this to, but I have thousands of miles fully loaded in monsoon conditions on the same set of pads for 2.5 years now. One other person has even more miles on his set.

Tim
Tim
14 days ago
Reply to  Bergsteiger

This is a great point!
At the same time, remember that cable brake’s pistons can’t float- they are fixed in place until you pull the lever. This means that if your rotor is a bit out of true, the pads are unable to move slightly out of the way, as hydros’ pads are. So, more scraping sounds if your rotor is bent, and it likely is- most rotors are. A solution is a Servo Wave cable lever, but these have to be scrounged up online as they’re out of production.
Small problem compared to the benefit of far longer pad life, but still.

Tim
Tim
14 days ago

What is the name of the front rack and basket?

Tim
Tim
14 days ago

Also, Ron- I think a question a lot of comparison people have in their minds is Klamper vs BB7. The opinion that the Klamper is a glorified BB7 is a very widespread one. Not saying that’s true or false, but it is a question a lot of people have.

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Ron Frazelle

Thanks for the response! What would you say was demomstrably worse about BB7s?

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Ron Frazelle

Also, what cable brakes really need at this point IMO is not another boutique caliper (although those are always welcome!), but rather a high-end lever with Servo Wave or similar tech inside- there is nothing with it in production. Levers make a MASSIVE difference! As in literally nearly doubling braking power.

Luke
Luke
13 days ago

If you used the same rotors for both tests, I’m not sure you got an apples-to-apples comparison regarding bed-in. That process is one in which pad material is deposited onto the rotor to form a flat interface surface that has the coefficient of friction of pad material to pad material contact. Meaning: bed-in only occurs when you have new, clean rotors. If you didn’t scotchbrite the rotors before Paul installation, then you didn’t really bed them in.

Jason
Jason
12 days ago

Hi at present I use TRP SLC spyre with Compressionless outers, I love their ease of maintenance and the way both sides are active and pull equally, how do you find the Paul’s Vs the SLC?

Stoli
Stoli
12 days ago

People who run discs on Campagnolo analog road grouppos can forget the Growtec and any other cable actuated option out there other than the Paul Klamper. Only Paul is supporting Campy users with a short arm option.

Tim
Tim
11 days ago
Reply to  Stoli

A BR reader whose job it is to build up custom bikes says older Shimano (if memory serves, pre-2010) has the same cable pull as Campy.
Shimano has created a lot of problems by making levers with three different leverage ratios and cable pulls and then never explaining what they’d done. Confusion may even have been their goal.

Fraser C.
Fraser C.
8 days ago

Hey Ron, great review write up! One thing I would add; I see your bike has a front rack, and I also note the actuation arms of the calipers are very different.. The Klamper arm could very easily interfere with, and possibly wear a hole in your front pannier (something I have had happen). The Growtac has what looks to be a narrower body, with the cable and actuation lever more out of the way. I would consider this to be a significant advantage to riders using front panniers.