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Like the Buffalo Gals, Pearson Goes Around The Outside on New Ti Gravel Bike

Pearson Bikes Around the Outside gravel bike hero(Photo/Pearson Bikes)
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Straight from “across the pond” in the UK, comes news that Pearson Bikes has released a new titanium Around the Outside gravel bike. A bike, they say, is made for expedition and the “maximum cargo” that entails.

I know the headline for this new piece was pretty funny. However, the truth is that the original version of the Around The Outside (ATO) was, actually inspired by the popular 80s hit by Malcolm McLaren. I’m not sure if that’s cool or not… that song was kinda dumb.

Pearson Around The Outside titanium adventure gravel bike

Pearson Bikes Around the Outside gravel bike font side
(Photos/Pearson)

Now, the first version of Pearson’s ATO was also dedicated to “maximum cargo”. But, this newly updated ATO offers the same cargo capacity with a geometry created by Pearson House Design to guarantee the rider the “‘”most sustainable” riding position.

Even though the bike has a sleek roadie-type aesthetic, the ATO is “every bit as capable as a modern mountain bike”. It can be run as a 1x with a maximum clearance for a 42t chainring. It’s equipped with internal routing and a plethora of mounting bosses.

Pearson Bikes Around the Outside gravel bike rear side

For the frame’s construction, Pearson uses high-spec titanium as a lifetime material that provides the shock-absorbing qualities of steel and a better weight-to-strength ratio than carbon. The ATO features high-quality 3AL 2.5V (Grade 9) hand-drawn tubes to combine strength with agility.

Pearson says the curved downtube allows “for extra clearance for both the front wheel and luggage, as well as larger tire sizes”. The ATO sports enough clearance for 29×2.2″ or 27.5×2.3 (650bx60mm) tires.

You can get the ATO with a rigid carbon fork and drop bars or with flat bars and a short travel (40mm) FOX front suspension fork.

It even has routing for a dropper post and dynamo lighting, plus routing for a USB top cap port (nice).

Pearson Bikes Around the Outside gravel bike front fork

The carbon fork offers adaptable cage mounting points and interchangeable dropouts for a 50 or 58mm offset. For instance, swapping allows you to change the fork’s trail to optimize front load-carrying options.

That fork also sports fender and front light mounting.

Technical Details

Pearson Bikes Around the Outside gravel bike seat stay bridge
  • Frameset: 3AL 2.5V titanium
  • Fork: Full unidirectional carbon expedition fork with additional bosses OR Fox 32 Float 40mm TC Factory FIT4 40mm travel suspension fork
  • Shifters: Shimano 11-speed St-RX815 Di2 OR Sl-RS700 mechanical
  • Chainset: Shimano Fc-RX810 40T
  • Cassette: Shimano XT M8000 11-42
  • Chain: Shimano HG-701
  • Rear Derailleur: Shimano Rd-RX817 Di2 OR Rd-RX812 mechanical
  • Brakes: Shimano Br-Rx10 hydraulic
  • Rotors: Shimano Rt-Mt800 160mm Ice Tech
  • Handlebars: Salsa Rustler
  • Stem: Pearson integrated carbon
  • Saddle: Fizik Terra Argo X5
  • Seatpost: Pearson Straight Up Carbon 31.6mm
  • Bartape: Fizik Terra Microtex Bondcush
  • Tires: Pirelli Cinturato Gravel M 700x40c/45c OR Pirelli Scorpion 2.2
  • Wheelset: DCR 25mm Deep Alloy OR Pearson Hoopdriver Rock & Roll 40mm deep carbon

*Please note that specifications may vary due to the availability of parts – we will, of course, make you aware of any changes.

Geometry

Pearson Around The Outside – Features and Retail Pricing

Around the Outside Complete Bike: $6000 (Shimano GRX 800 mechanical & DCR deep alloy wheels) Check here for different spec options.

Around the Outside Frameset: $3950

  • 3Al-2.5V titanium handmade frame
  • Comfortable all-day geometry
  • Curved downtube for increased mud clearance and improved luggage-carrying capabilities
  • Cast rear dropout for increased strength
  • Compatible with both mechanical and electronic gearing
  • Expedition bottle bosses on the fork, top tube, and underside of the downtube
  • Ability to run 29×2” (700x50c), or 27.5×2.3” (650×60) tires
  • Dynamo routing and rear light mount
  • 1x specific gearing

Pearson1860.com

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17 Comments
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bill
bill
1 month ago

great album, and cool reference

Astro_Kraken
Astro_Kraken
1 month ago

I don’t get why bottom brackets need to get higher as tires get bigger.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  Astro_Kraken

This is a LOT of BB drop if you’re mountain biking. It’s a bit high for a gravel bike but they’re trying to make it a do all bike

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  Astro_Kraken

Yeah, IMO 68 BB drop is pretty dodgy if not panniered down on this, and sending it offroad instead.

carbonfodder
carbonfodder
1 month ago

I think the numbers are wrong on the geometry grid. Take a look at size M and L TT, HA, SA then at wheelbase for same. HA and SA are identical, L has 12mm longer TT, yet L is listed with a 2 mm shorter wheelbase. Chainstays are same length too… Not sure how they do more TT and come up with less WB, but they do! Must be the new math or something.
Otherwise this looks pretty spanky to my eyeballs. (And Buffalo Gals was genius pop, just sayin’)

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  carbonfodder

For sure it’s wrong. Looks like the L should have 1052 WB and unclear what the XL should have. 1039 seems like data entry issue at the OEM and Pearson didn’t notice / bother to check it.

Scott (Pearson Cycles)
Scott (Pearson Cycles)
1 month ago
Reply to  Oliver

Mixup on geo charts during development, and me not double checking my figures after a long day 😉 Thanks!

Scott (Pearson Cycles)
Scott (Pearson Cycles)
1 month ago
Reply to  carbonfodder

Thanks for spotting the errors – slight mixup on versions of the geometry chart during development of the frame… Correct one should be attached here and wheelbase measurements are correct with the 58mm offset on fork.

ATO_GEO_CHART (update 16th Jan 24).png
Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago

those are giant differences … what are the HTA / STA in the respective offsets then?

WhupWhup
WhupWhup
1 month ago

Nice seatstay bridge and cap details.

Scott (Pearson Cycles)
Scott (Pearson Cycles)
1 month ago
Reply to  WhupWhup

Thanks 🙂

DefRyder
DefRyder
1 month ago

And 1/2 the price of a Moots…

qillie
qillie
1 month ago
Reply to  DefRyder

and you can get a full lynskey for the price of.. one frameset lol

threeringcircus
threeringcircus
1 month ago
Reply to  DefRyder

…but quite a bit pricier than other frames made in Taiwan or China, like the Otso Warakin or Bearclaw offerings. Shoot, you can even get a ti fork on a Bearclaw Thunderhawk for $3k.

Bert
Bert
1 month ago

I will gladly pay more for a product not made in Taiwan or China as quality in those countries are mutually exclusive.

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  Bert

The best large volume (i.e. bigger than one man shops) Ti frame builders are in TW and China. But this is a lot pricier than others – even many of the ones made at Ora.

mud
mud
1 month ago

Kinda tall gearing for an adventure bike

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