Lucinda Brand came to the start line of the 2022 Cyclocross World Championships as the defending champ. Marianne Vos was not far from where she stood, her compatriot and closest threat to keeping the rainbow jersey.

Marianne Vos CX bike Vos and Brand battle

Photo credit: Alex Hays

The pair of Vos and Brand would do battle over the 55-minute race, throwing punches (metaphorically) when they could and hanging on for blistering attacks. In the end, Vos unleashed a well-timed sprint and captured the jersey and a record eighth World Championship title.

Lucinda Brand had a tremendous season, winning the World Cup overall, the European Championships, never losing a race in the Super Prestige or X2O Trophy series. She was an unstoppable force, no matter what the conditions. Lucindas’ success comes from hard work, determination, and a tightknit support team.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone name sticker

Photo: Jordan Villella

The Bike

Brands’ weapon of choice for the 2021-2022 season is the newly updated Trek Boone. Her bike shares part of that success; finely tuned, every detail pored over and perfectly torqued in place. The team at Trek revisited the tube shapes, ISO Speed decoupler, and tire clearance to make this bike even more of a race rocket.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone headtube

Photo: Jordan Villella

Upon chatting with the team from Baloise Trek Lions, we learn some incredible custom details about Lucindas’ bike that may lead to future production tweaks for the next year’s Boone. For the Baloise Trek Lions team (and other factory athletes), they have the option to run a different offset fork than one that comes standard on the Trek Boone.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone Bontrager XXX Stem and custom badge

Photo: Jordan Villella

The different rake fork is only an option for sizes 52cm and down. The new 50mm offset fork (differing from the 45mm spec) gives the bike better handling at speed and helps the front end stay stable in twisty high-speed steering features.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone drivetrain

Photo: Jordan Villella

The attempt is to get the bike to feel as neutral as possible and have a little “fighting against the rider.” This neutrality helps especially for super sandy and muddy tracks, allowing the rider to stay in the center of the bike and giving the bike freedom to move when needed.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone shifter setup and badge Euro Champ

Photo: Jordan Villella

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone Dugast tires

Photo: Jordan Villella

The 50mm offset helps also helps with toe overlap but allows for a solid front center groove better for slower speed steering.

As for components; the Baloise Trek Lions goes with full SRAM Red 12 speed eTap builds for everyone on the team. For Saturday’s World Championship race, Lucinda ran a 38T front chainring on her SRAM Red crankset and a 10-33T SRAM Force cassette.

Photo: Jordan Villella

The wheels are Bontrager’s newest (and only) carbon tubular race wheel — Aeolus RSL 37. Some of the riders for Baloise Trek Lions are on Challenge and others on Dugast. Lucinda raced on Dugast 32mm Typhoon tires; our photo bike has a Rhinos — possibly just for cleaning.

Fun fact — 13 of the 18 medals in the 2022 World Championships were won on Dugast Typhoon tires!

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone Bontrager Saddle

Photo: Jordan Villella

The Baloise Trek Lions Team can choose from many Bontrager saddles; Lucina opts for the Bontrager Aeolus (a super narrow looking one — possibly a 135mm size that’s not yet available to the public). We’re guessing this is the same saddle on her road setup with Trek-Segafredo. It’s an excellent saddle for easy hip movement and delivers a powerful locked-in position on the bike.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone cockpit and shifter SRAM

Photo: Jordan Villella

The cock-pit for Lucinda Brands Trek Boone is relatively neutral. She runs a 400mm Bontrager Pro IsoCore carbon bar. The IsoCore offers some extra padding and a relatively short and shallow reach, pair that with the SRAM Red Etap levers, and this is a sharp steering machine.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone lightweight seat mast

Photo: Jordan Villella

Lucinda has a custom European Champion Bontrager Blendr mount on her Bontrager XXX carbon stem. If you look closely at the IsoSpeed seat mast, you’ll notice an extra lightweight collar. This updated mast was developed for the super lightweight Trek Emonda but found its way over to the ‘cross teams looking for some weight reduction.

Lucinda Brands' Trek Boone full bike

Photo: Jordan Villella

Details — Lucinda Brands’ Trek Boone with custom fork offset

Frame: 600 Series OCLV Carbon, IsoSpeed rear, 3S chain keeper, T47 Bottom bracket
Fork: Trek all-carbon, 12mm thru-axle, 50mm custom offset
Shift/Brake Levers: SRAM Red eTap AXS Shift-Brake Levers
Brake Calipers: SRAM Red eTap AXS, flat mount
Brake Rotors: SRAM Centerline, 140mm
Crankset: SRAM Red 170mm
Chain Ring: SRAM X-Sync 2, 38t
Rear Derailleur: SRAM Red eTap AXS
Cassette: SRAM Force, 10-33t, 12-speed
Wheels: Bontrager Aeolus RSL 37 carbon tubulars
Tires: Dugast Typhoon tubulars, 700c x 32mm
Handlebar: Bontrager Pro IsoCore carbon VR-CF, 400mm
Stem: Bontrager XXX Carbon Blendr with Custom European Champion Flag
Seat Mast Cap: Trek Round Ultra-light Carbon Seat Mast Cap & 10mm Ears
Saddle: Bontrager Aeolus Pro with carbon rails
Pedals: Shimano XTR M9100 SPD
More Info: trekbikes.com

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RideCX
4 months ago

Interesting. Have not seen these details elsewhere, thanks. Fork rake per frame size makes a lot of sense, especially for smaller bikes.

RideCX
4 months ago

Right on. Toe clip overlap drives me crazy, and I’m a taller guy with bigger frames, where it’s easier to avoid. Can’t imagine trying to ride a 49cm with a bunch of toe overlap off-road where you turn the handlebar dramatically during slow speed turns.

Pm732
Pm732
4 months ago

Other than “fighting against the rider” everything you said describes the 45mm fork, not the 50. 50 is going to be twitchier at speed.

Antoine
Antoine
4 months ago
Reply to  Pm732

Exactly my thought, there has been a constant push towards lower offset in the mtb workd to get better high speed stability and lower offset forks really felt better to me. I had to ditch a great offer on a cannondale because the steering just felt bad because they insisted to keep a bigger offset. You can really see there that CX is driven by roadies and if a CX bike does not feel like a road bike it’s just not right. It’s true for handlebars too were many riders use crazy narrow setup when the steering is really so much better with a bit more width.
The toe overlap is an interesting argument but i’d have gone for a longer reach smaller stem but i guess the CX world is not ready for that.
I enjoy CX and i even have one but can’t see the benefit of numerous old school thing they insist on keeping.

R C
R C
4 months ago
Reply to  Pm732

Yeah, it sounds like they are reducing trail to exchange stability for maneuverability.

John Caletti
4 months ago
Reply to  Pm732

They don’t give the head angle, but likely the head angle is less on the smaller bikes, and thus will be pretty close in trail with the fork change. It’s important to look at both the fork offset (“rake”) and head angle together (which can be described by the “trail” number). Usually the smaller bikes will get a reduced head angle and more offset in the fork to produce a similar trail as a larger bike, but with a longer Front Center for better toe clearance. Also, the shorter wheelbase and low height of rider and bike make for a bit quicker steering bike (lower stability) than in a taller, bigger, longer bike – thus it can be advantageous to increase the trail to provide a little more stability. Of course where this lands is subjective and designers and riders have their preferences, like lower trail/faster steering/ lower stability for a more road bike like feel, or more trail/more stability for rougher terrain, and probably feels more at home for a mountain biker moving to a gravel or CX bike.

Andrew
Andrew
4 months ago

The increased Fork offset sounds similar to the ‘OutFront’ Steering geometry on the Cannondale SuperX/SuperSixEvo CX, does it not?

nilst
nilst
4 months ago

Do you mean “13 of the 18 medals won at the the 2022 World Championships” were on Dugast Typhoon. There were only six championship races, right?

Need4gforce@gmail.com
Need4gforce@gmail.com
4 months ago
Reply to  nilst

3 medals per race. ..

Need4gforce@gmail.com
Need4gforce@gmail.com
4 months ago
Reply to  nilst

3 medals per race.