Canyon’s new 2022 Lux Trail is a subtle update to their World Cup XCO-proven full-suspension mountain bike, with a bit more travel and tweaked geometry to make it more trail-ready. And while the few changes are relatively minor, they really do add up nicely to create a lightweight mountain bike that climbs well and is more fun on the descents. Whether or not we call it ‘downcountry’, the new Lux Trail is at home on a wider range of trails than ever. And it probably could still toe a race start line when you aren’t slaying singletrack on the new bike…

Canyon Lux Trail lightweight 110/120mm mountain bike

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, complete

2022 Canyon Lux Trail CF 7 complete

The new & slightly longer travel Canyon Lux Trail bike looks almost identical to the original 2019 Lux that I first rode three years ago. So similar in fact, that I didn’t have to worry about being secretive while test riding it for the last few weeks before the new version was announced. Side-by-side only the new paintjob & a bit less kink in the toptube might give it away. At a glance, no one’s going to really notice an extra 10mm of travel front & rear.

2019 Canyon Lux 100mm lightweight XC mountain bike

2019 Canyon Lux CF SLX 9 Pro Race

Three years ago when I rode the original Lux in one of its lightest (10.5kg), most expensive, and shortest travel (100/100mm) versions… I came away impressed with how well it climbed & descended. This bike seems to have kept all the best of that, and made going down hill more fun.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, Rychleby

In simple terms, only the front triangle of the Canyon Lux Trail is new, but there’s enough there to completely reshape how this bike rides.

What’s actually different?

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, geometry comparison

2019 Lux CF SLX & SL vs. 2022 Lux Trail geometry comparison

A bump up to 110mm of rear wheel and 120mm of fork travel is the essence of the Lux Trail update, paired with 25mm more frame reach and a noticeably slacker head angle – a full 2.5° slacker than the SLX which shares the same BB drop & seat angles.

Canyon has mostly been comparing the new Lux Trail CF to the original Canyon Lux CF SLX to highlight the different character from their World Cup XC race bike to this more versatile light-duty trail bike. But let’s not forget that there already was a ‘light trail’ version from the start with the Canyon Lux CF SL with 100mm of rear wheel travel paired to slightly longer 110mm forks.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, frame angled

The SL & Trail are also a better comparison as this new bike shares the less premium carbon layup coming out to a 1895g Lux Trail CF frameset weight claim with hardware, vs. the 1852g claim of the Lux CF SL. Why is it heavier with the same layup? Canyon says it comes down to simple geometry – the longer front triangle has more material in it.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, driveside

But Canyon decided the lower BB & steeper seat angle of the SLX race bike would be even better starting point for the added travel and longer & slacker front end.

Tech details

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, protection details

The bike uses the same single-pivot suspension with flex in the stays and a pair of small linkages to drive the shock. The 1x only bike builds a small chain guide into the main pivot, behind which a chainstay bridge provides rear end stiffness and a path for the internal cable routing… but also a gap to fill up with dirt & debris thrown off the rear tire.

Up front modular cable ports route housing into the headtube. And the Impact Protection Unit (IPU) limits bar rotation to keep from damaging the frame in a crash. I actually tested it out a bit one time I hopped off the bike. And I found that if the steering stopper isn’t tight enough on the steerer, it’ll still rotate negating any benefit. It just seems to add an extra bolt to have to manage when adjusting your headset. In any case, like Canyon’s XC pros do, it is easily removable, too.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, front triangle

Again there’s room for two large water bottles in every frame size. You can ride farther without a bag on your back. There was still plenty more room inside my large test bike’s front triangle. So I’d likely look to a solution that included a tool carrier/bag above or below the downtube bottle.

The Lux Trail tucks its shock quite tight up under the thinned toptube. All of the complete Lux Trail builds include internally routed remote lockouts, and Canyon is said to have worked on custom lockout linkages for Fox & RockShox to keep everything tidy (but there’s not tons of room left to get your fingers on the adjuster knobs.)

Component Highlights

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, cockpit detail

There are more external cables than we’re used to leaving a slightly crowded cockpit with all those lockouts plus dropper remotes. The lockout remote is in a position we’ve become accustomed to for droppers, so I more than once hit the wrong control to drop my seat vs. lock out the shocks. The RockShox bikes get a gripshift-style twistlock remote for suspension control, which could be less troublesome.

But realistically, once you have the suspension set up properly with 20-25% sag out back, the lockout is only really a big help of steep paved or super smooth climbing. The Lux Trail, like the regular Lux before it, climbs really well with very little bob.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, rear end detail

The back of the Lux Trail is completely unchanged. The new bike shares the identical rear triangle from the Lux CF SL. You get the integrated hide-away Quixle thru-axle and road-style flat mount disc brake.

My EU-spec Lux Trail CF 7 comes with the 100mm travel Fox Transfer SL dropper, which feels like not quite enough drop for real trail riding. The post has only two positions – full up or full down, which I can’t really get used to after riding infinitely adjustable hydraulic droppers. It also seems a bit finicky for much lower seatpost clamping force than the frame’s clamp is rated. In any case, the RockShohox bikes get longer 125mm droppers, and the US-spec Shimano bikes get pleasantly longer 150mm droppers instead.

Actual Weight

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, 12.43kg actual weight

The bike I’ve been riding since the start of August is the middle-spec 2022 Canyon Lux Trail CF 7 with a complete XT 1×12 groupset, DT carbon wheels, Fox Performance Elite level suspension, and a pricetag of 4300€. Canyon claims a complete bike weight of 11.7kg. My test bike with a pair of 340g Crankbrothers Candy 3 pedals, 100g of Canyon sideloader bottle cages weighed in ready to ride at 12.43kg/27.40lb with sealant in the tires (<300g more than claimed.)

For comparison that’s almost 2kg more than the short travel race Lux I’d tested before, but surprisingly not really any heavier than a similarly-spec’d or similarly-priced version of the still shorter Lux CF SL.

(In a shout out to a concerned reader from 3 years back, I hung the bike with the dropper down. Usually a no-no, this short 100mm Fox Transfer SL dropper is all mechanical so no IFP to worry about.)

Riding Impressions

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, non-driveside

My size large test bike got 25mm more reach and longer toptube length (apparently just +20mm on smaller sizes), which a 20mm shorter stem brought back to an almost negligible difference in on the bike fit. But all the extra travel (+10mm out back & +20mm up front) vs. the Lux SLX I tested before, meant this new Lux Trail ended up with a 50mm longer wheelbase in addition to the 2.5° slacker headtube. (Even with the 20mm extra travel, the new bike’s stack was only 9mm higher. All I needed to do was pull one steerer spacer to get my bar in the same position.)

The longer wheelbase & slacker front end certainly feels balanced when riding trails at speed, and more confidently stable when the trails get technical. That likely is aided by the fact that my weight sat even lower than on the 100mm bike. The Lux Trail position was essentially the same as the 100mm Lux, before sitting a bit lower with its additional sag.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, frameset

There’s no more tire clearance than before (Canyon rates it up to 2.4″ on 30mm internal rims). But the Trail bike builds get beefier tires, without going overboard. The Lux Trail moves from 2.2″ XC race tires before, to a more trail-ready Schwalbe 2.4″ Wicked Will / 2.35″ Racing Ralph tire combination, still with a light Super Race TLE casing. I managed to push them to their limit on the roughest & rockiest trails, but they seem a good fit with the bike for versatile trail riding.

Final Thoughts on riding the new Canyon Lux Trail

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, Dolni Morava

Canyon calls the new Lux Trail a “light, fast, and capable” bike. It definitely feels like an improvement over the original, delivering much more technical trail riding capability without any real noticeable sacrifice in pedaling or climbing efficiency. No surprise that this bike is a bit heavier than the 100/100mm XC race version of the Lux that I rode last.

Canyon Lux Trail, a slightly longer travel downcountry XC marathon light trail mountain bike review, Rychleby rocks

But I feel like that extra weight is actually where you want it, in a stiffer fork, a bit more forgiving travel, more capable tires, and of course more stable slack geometry. It is still a light bike at around 12kg, but now it even more fun when the trails get steep & rough. The standard Lux is still a good option if you are looking for a race-only bike. But the Lux Trail will open up more places to ride, from smooth singletrack to boundary-pushing technical trails, too.

Want more details on the Lux Trail launch? Check out our detailed tech article here.

Canyon.com

11 comments

    • alloycowboy on

      @None Given… Cory weighted the bike with pedals and water bottle cages. So subtract a pound. Canyon also speced the bike with trail tires so that is another pound.

      Reply
    • Cory Benson on

      The 2021 S-Works Epic Evo we tested (here) weighed a real 21.5lb/9.75kg on our same scale, without pedals, cages, or dropper post in size medium. And it costs $11,250 / 12,500€, more than 2x this new 2cm longer Reach Canyon. That’s not exactly the same price category when looking at the more accessible 26.43lb/11.99kg Lux Trail 7 at just $5300 / 4300€, even if their travel is the same… almost 5lbs and $6k between the two.

      Reply
      • None Given on

        Cory, thank you for the reply – but, not the same bike. The Epic is 100/100 with Brain. The Epic Evo (I ride the S version) is actually lighter with 110/120 and no Brain. I also have 34SC and XTR brakes (XX1 AXS shifting) and Rotor Kapic Alu Cranks, Alu bars, Alu stem. Oh, and dual lockout Fox shocks (not exactly OE for 2021 but 2022 changed from RockShox to Fox)

        You are right that the S-Works is not the same price category, the qualifier to me was your statement – “But let’s not forget that there already was a ‘light trail’ version from the start” – where price was not a consideration, weight was. 🙂

        Reply
        • Cory Benson on

          @None, totally my mistake. I mixed that up, having thought that Jordan tested & weighed the S-Works Epic EVO, not the shorter Brain-equipped version whose frameset is 200g lighter, but spec’d with longer, heavier forks.

          21.1lbs for your Epic Evo ready-to-ride is in fact super light. I bet it’s a blast!

          The earlier ‘light trail’ version was referring more to light-duty trail riding on the original Lux CF SL with 100/110mm travel as opposed to weight specifically. This more aggressive geometry Lux Trail version is more capable, and more of an all-arounder mid-duty trail bike with 110/120mm travel (like your bike.)

          All of the Canyon Lux models are light, but never quite super light like the Epic family, with the Lux Trail nearly 500g heavier than the surprisingly light Epic EVO frameset with shock.

          Reply
          • sx5r on

            interestingly Canyon does not start the “new” model with their top of the line Carbon layup but with the cheapest of the 3. There might be around 400-500g between the CF and a hypothetical CFR (estimate based on the weight differences of the Exceed CF vs CFR)
            also they still do not use their new improved cable routing (from the Exceed) which I find annoying.
            Right now the Lux Trail CF is not a real contender compared to an Epic Evo – but a CRF-upgrade might make for a serious battle 😉

            Reply
  1. O'cat on

    Hi Cory,

    You’re on the right way. I’m a little laughing that you need the help of Canyon but, indeed, you’re on the right way.

    I mounted 1 year ago a Nicolai Saturn 11 with a 130 mm travel Formula 33 fork.

    100 % carbon free, 12.5 kg ready to start with carefull choice of components and a dream bike to ride. It climbs almost as fast as my titanium comp bike and gets down on severe single tracks nearly as an enduro bike. Just need a 2.3 front tire and DH Formula light brakes 😉

    Keep on going with your site, I do like it

    Reply
    • Zach Overholt on

      I’ll get Cory to chime in here too, but figured I should say that I’m on a medium of the same bike. At 5’8″ with a 69cm saddle to BB measurement, I can just fit with a 125mm AXS dropper post and a thinner saddle. The fit on this bike seems to be bigger compared to other similar bikes, for example, a Santa Cruz Blur TR STL is 430mm for a size M, the Canyon is 465mm for a size M, and the Canyon has longer reach and top tube numbers per size. That’s definitely something to consider when choosing sizing.

      The rest of the bike fits me pretty well, but the seat tube length is not ideal for me—but it’s also made worse by the Reverb AXS’ tall stack height. The 125mm drop Reverb AXS post measures about 185mm from the bottom of the collar to the middle of the saddle rails, which is almost identical to the 150mm drop Fox Transfer. FWIW, Canyon’s sizing chart puts me on a small, so I’d like to try one to see how it compares.

      Reply

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