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Review: Fezzari Veyo SL aero road bike defies the wind

riding review of 2023 fezzari veyo sl
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The Fezzari Veyo debuted in January with a very-light-for-an-aero-bike frame, big tire clearance, and a few surprises. I’ve been riding it since couple months prior to launch and now, with a several hundred miles on it and a few really long (50-80 mile) rides, I have some thoughts.

The short version is this: It’s fast, fully modern with ample tire clearance, comfortable enough, and also really, really fast. Did I mention it’s fast? Because it is most definitely, noticeably, very fast.

Let’s take a closeup look at the frame and the complete bike weight first; ride review is at bottom…

Fezzari Veyo SL tech details & actual weight

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

I rode the size XL bike and, at 6’2″ with normal proportions, it fit great. Fezzari’s size chart would have put me on a Large, but the XL’s 585mm ETT is spot on for how I like a bike to fit.

That left plenty of seatpost extension thanks to a mildly sloping top tube, which also kept the bike feeling spritely underneath. Low seatstays improve comfort and aerodynamics, but my take is that they do more for the aero part than the comfort part (more on that below).

At a glance, I think the bike looks great…proportions, shapes, profile, I like it all. And a closer look only makes things look better and more interesting.

Truncated airfoil shapes throughout the frame blend into one another really nicely. A deeper head tube keeps the front end torsionally stuff, which is noticeable when standing and cranking.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup headset details

They use the FSA stealth headset system, which keeps appearances clean without limiting cockpit selection.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup headset and stem details

When it is paired with their Vision stem, lower covers can hide the brake hoses and other other wires or cables from the handlebar back. If you use a handlebar and stem that runs those things internally, you’ll never see any of it. As is, it’s pretty much completely hidden from view (and wind).

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

The fork’s crown blends directly into the shape of the head tube. Compared to the skinny legs of the Fezzari Shafer gravel bike’s fork, this one looks more normal and provides excellent lateral stability and reasonable fore-aft impact deflection.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

There’s no trying to hide the water bottles behind oversize downtubes, but they do shape those tubes well, and give you a two-position mount for the downtube’s cage. Run it lower if you’re only using one bottle, or move it up to make room for a second.

I like that Fezzari put the seat tube bottle’s placement as low as possible, at least hiding it within any turbulence caused by your feet and the first bottle.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

The top tube is probably more shapely than it needs to be, but adds to the bike’s overall aesthetic. The bike is UCI approved if you want to race it, and they say it’s perfect for anything from crits to fondos.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

The rear wheel tucks into the seat tube, and smooth lines flow from the downtube, across the BB shell, and into the stays.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

Up top, a custom seatpost uses a truncated aero profile with a wedge to secure it. The rubber flap slides up and down the post as you adjust, helping keep the elements out, but a small hole allows height adjustments without peeling it up.

seatpost detail showing di2 battery in Veyo SL

A standard Di2 battery holder fits inside the front edge of the post.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup bottom bracket details

Back down low, the chainstays have a surprising amount of shaping. Combined with a BB shell that tapers all the way out to the edges, they provide a very stiff bottom half for maximum power transfer. I couldn’t detect any twist or flex under hard efforts, whether seated or standing.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup chainstay details

I also just really liked the shaping from a visual standpoint, too. About the only things I’d change on this would be to use tool-free stealth thru axles and swap in a carbon fiber handlebar.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup tire clearance details

I ran 700×28 tires and there’s room for days. The frame is rated for up to 700x32mm tires.

I stuck with the “narrower” 28s because I wanted to focus on a speedy build during testing, and 28s provide a good amount of comfort without being too heavy. They also proved to work very well with the Zipp 404 Firecrest wheels in making this bike slide past air molecules like they didn’t exist.

For longer rides or if I knew the pavement would be less than ideal, I’d lean more on a bigger tire to help mitigate the little bit of road noise I felt. While the Veyo SL fit me very well, it’s still an aero frame, which by nature of the tube shapes tend to be stiffer than more traditionally shaped bikes.

That said, it’s not uncomfortable or harsh, just also not a regular road bike. The tradeoff for speed is worth it, and I still finished 4-5+ hour rides just fine. But also, I’d swap in a carbon bar and/or a bit thicker bar tape.

actual weight of 2023 fezzari veyo sl

Complete bike weight with two Fezzari water bottles, Ultegra Di2, Ergon saddle, alloy FSA bar and stem, Zipp 404 Firecrest wheels and Schwalbe Pro One 700×28 tubeless tires is 17lb 6oz (7.83kg).

This isn’t a stock build, I used my wheels and tires, but Fezzari does offer a Zipp 404 wheelset upgrade option, so you can get pretty close to recreating this yourself. The point is, it’s pretty light, especially for an aero bike.

The Veyo Pro SL model (with Ultegra Di2) runs $4,999 with DT Swiss ER1600 alloy wheels. The Zipp 404 Firecrest upgrade adds $1,300 (or get Zipp 303S for +$700). The housebrand Dual Entry Bottle Cages that came on the bike are an $18 add-on (each) and are some of the tightest cages I’ve ever used…no chance of dropping a bottle out of these.

Fezzari Veyo SL ride review

riding review of 2023 fezzari veyo sl

I couldn’t really find any area where the Veyo didn’t impress me. Just cruising with friends? Perfect. Pacing folks into a headwind? Not too bad. Tucking in and absolutely dropping them on the descents? Easy.

Even with stronger riders, I seemed more able to keep up and keep going longer and/or faster than usual. It was subtle, but I felt like the “fast guys” in the bunch noticed, too, because they started taking a keen interest in the Veyo.

riding review of 2023 fezzari veyo sl

Fezzari says the bike’s designed to corner sharp and remain stable on high-speed, sweping descents. I didn’t have any alpine passes to test the latter on, but our own rolling hills and meandering backroad routes provided plenty of small tests for both.

The Veyo reacted quickly to intentional inputs without being overly sensitive to the careless micro movements made during normal riding. If you like a bike to handle with a lot of “character”, the Veyo SL will have searching hard for it, but that’s not a bad thing for a bike like this.

Meaning, I could ride two abreast, inches from another handlebar, without drama or concern. It came to life when needed, then settled back in for the long haul, steady and efficient.

riding review of 2023 fezzari veyo sl

Crank things up on a climb or sprint and it reacts immediately. And considering how light deep-ish wheels like the 404 have gotten these days, and that this frame is just 860g (claimed, size M), there’s no penalty on the ascents for aero benefits everywhere else.

riding review of 2023 fezzari veyo sl

Random Review Notes

I wanted to title this “…defies the wind, and expectations”, but by this point Fezzari has established itself as making some pretty darn good bikes that, by sticking to a consumer direct model, are also extremely affordable. So, I expected the Veyo to be good, and it delivered. The brand continues to offer top-shelf performance at great prices.

They’re also gently nudging things forward by incorporating future standards early, giving riders comfort knowing that their frame is upgradeable. The flexible internal routing design lets you run any cockpit you want while still having full internal routing feeding in at the headset. Like it or not, you’re going to see more and more of this in more and more categories.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike review - closeup frame details

The Veyo also has a UDH-like rear derailleur hanger. There’s no direct-mount road derailleur yet, but I could see that happening in the future, too. So, why not include it here? At a minimum, it puts rear derailleur placement into tighter spec than not, so it’s a good thing even if DM RD’s never happen on road.

fezzari veyo sl aero road bike shown on a dirt gravel road

Lastly, it handles rough dirt and light gravel roads just fine, too. Many of my longer weekend rides end up on random forest roads, the odd piece of singletrack, or even pure gravel. I’m happy to say that the Fezzari Veyo SL is plenty quick here, too, even if it does look a bit out of place.

All in all, Fezzari continues to punch above its price class for well-conceived, generously featured, forward-thinking bikes. The Veyo SL is a great addition to the aero bike category and one I’d recommend checking out.

Fezzari.com

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11 Comments
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Larry Falk
Larry Falk
1 year ago

The bike looks great (except the black color, I like the tan paint). I hope Fezzari makes an endurance bike (with geometry like the Trek Domane) with aero cues taken from the Veyo.

whatever
whatever
1 year ago

BB86 press fit bottom bracket…ABSOFREAKINGLUTELY NOT!! I have another Fezzari bike, that I have been happy with. Had an issue that needed to be sorted out, and they were very reasonable and helpful. I know others that have their mountain bikes, and all are happy with them. With that said, a press fit bottom bracket is a absolute deal killer.Hopefully, they will not repeat this very poor choice in the future.

Geronimo
Geronimo
1 year ago
Reply to  whatever

It’s so funny to hear that about the BB86. It’s never bothered me and I’m guessing it helps achieve that light weight. Would you be ok with an added 60-100 grams just for a threaded bottom bracket?

whatever
whatever
1 year ago
Reply to  Geronimo

Yes I would, Over a creaking bike. Whether you have had a problem or not means nothing. Been way to many issues with press-fit.

Oliver
Oliver
1 year ago
Reply to  whatever

BB386 (also pf) would have been a much better choice. But BB86 is still a preferable choice to any thread fit BB on carbon frames. If they can’t make a round hole, that opens up a huge can of worms with thread fit too – besides the aluminium shell debonding which it will do eventually anyway.

Robin
Robin
1 year ago
Reply to  Oliver

I wasn’t aware that an aluminum thread-fit BB shell in a CF frame has to debond. I guess that’s because it’s not true. It’s true for frames in which such BBs aren’t manufactured and bonded correctly, but I’m willing to bet there are a lot of old CF frames with aluminum shells in the BB that have not unbonded. Heck, right now I’m looking at 16-year-old CF frame with a threaded BB made possible by the aluminum shell bonded into that BB. There are zero signs of corrosion or of the bond failing.

I look forward to perusing the evidence you have that shows that all metal BB shells in CF frames will come unbonded.

olivier
olivier
9 months ago
Reply to  Robin

IT will eventually de-bond, the reason is simply due to the difference in heat dissipation and expansions. The 2 materials will contract and expend differently, no bond can prevent it. It will take time, but will happen.
I have not specific feeling about one or the other BB.

JoeyG13
JoeyG13
10 months ago
Reply to  whatever

Lol, you really think BB86 pressfit would be bad? My Giant TCR says otherwise. Sure there are some bad ones, but the same can be said w/ threadfit. Also, you really should watch this Hambini (very well-known bike engineer) on why Pressfit is king and threadfit actually have a lot of issues that are masked (ie. parallel misalignment).

https://youtu.be/3l6EcBg9EPA?t=663

Grillis
Grillis
1 year ago

It looks like everything else.

Chris
Chris
1 year ago

For $3,500 you can get it with Shimano 105 mechanical shifting! For $500 more you get 105 Di2.

G Miller
G Miller
10 months ago

Great value, but hard pass with the press fit BB. Never again will I purchase a bike with press fit. In the future, I’d also like to see a 1X groupset option, for those of us that live in flatter areas. Low maintenance bikes is where it’s at.

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