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Schwalbe Tire Booster big air can makes tubeless tire mounting quick, easy & portable

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Schwalbe Tire Booster high pressure refillable air cylinder to make tubeless tire mounting easier and quicker

We’ve seen and tested several floor pumps with auxiliary air chambers that can be filled to high pressures for easier tubeless tire mounting. Now, Schwalbe’s made that system more portable by separating the high pressure chamber from the pump. The new Schwalbe Tire Booster is a steel can that you can pump up to 11bar (160psi), then attach to your valve stem to quickly fill  and seat a tubeless tire. Besides being a little more portable, or just letting you have a couple of them handy for fleet seating, it also threads onto the valve stem such that you can remove the valve core if higher air flow is needed.

Schwalbe Tire Booster high pressure refillable air cylinder to make tubeless tire mounting easier and quicker

The Tire Booster can be refilled with a standard floor pump, so long as that pump can push air up to 11bar. It’ll retail for €59,90 when it starts shipping in December 2016, weight is 435g. It was developed in partnership with British firm Airshot, which also sells the device with their branding for £59.99.

Schwalbe.com

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Greg
Greg
7 years ago

similar product from Specialized is $40

Greg
Greg
7 years ago
Reply to  Greg

I was lied to. It’s $55, at least on their website.

jay
jay
7 years ago
Reply to  Greg

that also maxes out at 140psi

AV
AV
7 years ago
Reply to  jay

Actually, the operating pressure for the Specialized Blast is 140psi because the canister is bigger so you don’t need to go as high. Technically the max psi is 180 and its controlled by a bleed valve but there is no need to go that high.
(Full disclosure, I work for Specialized so take that as you will)

deanaaargh
deanaaargh
7 years ago

I am confused (or possibly being simple), what is the purpose of inflating a tire without a valve core? I imagine it would deflate rather quickly after.

dave
dave
7 years ago
Reply to  deanaaargh

to get the beads seated.

caiuschen
caiuschen
7 years ago
Reply to  deanaaargh

Theoretically, it’s the initial seating of the tire that is the most difficult, and once seated it’s supposed to be easy to reseat with normal pumping methods. Many people seat the tire first, then deflate again to add sealant, and then re-inflate to avoid sealant going everywhere.

john
john
7 years ago
Reply to  deanaaargh

As dave says, it increases the amount of air flow to seat the bead. While yes it deflates quite quickly, one can put their finger over the opening and quickly screw in the core before attaching a conventional pump and adding air until the leaks stop enough to roll the tire around and build up that sealant more.

deanaaargh
deanaaargh
7 years ago
Reply to  john

Thanks for the clarification.

(you can pry my tubes from my cold dead hands, I may be simple but I’m also obstinate)

pTymnWolfe
pTymnWolfe
7 years ago
Reply to  deanaaargh

Thats cool thanks for the offer but no one wants your tubes. Have you heard about tubeless?

Matt
Matt
7 years ago
Reply to  deanaaargh

I get if maybe you said you didn’t want to switch over to disc brakes on your road bike quite yet, but riding with tubes on your MTB is equivalent to saying you still use a Commodore for your computer.

shaynaplusshulman
7 years ago
Reply to  Matt

(deleted)…. Even if you ride tubeless you still need to carry a tube for those times you might slash a sidewall or put a hole in your tire big enough that sealant won’t seal (unless of course you only ride uber buff, granny trails)

Cameron Lloyd
Cameron Lloyd
7 years ago

Take out the valve core, pump up the tire to seat the bead. Remove pump. All of the air will escape but you have the bead set. Put the valve core back in and tighten. Pump tire to about 40-50 psi. Remove pump and rotate tire around to get all sealant around the whole tire. Release as much air to get to desired riding pressure.

I don’t understand why these companies need to produce products that the industry doesn’t need? Setting up tubeless is much easier than companies like Schwalbe tries to make it.

Necromancer
7 years ago
Reply to  Cameron Lloyd

Your method does not work on all tire combinations. The ones it does usually require vigorous pumping and preying.

Carbonfodder
Carbonfodder
7 years ago

Or, for $2 worth of parts you probably have sitting around your place… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtmatxJG_zg

onrhodes
7 years ago

Just buy an air compressor from Home Depot, Lowes, Sears, etc for like $99. As a homeowner it serves multiple purposes, only one of which is seating tubeless tires.

dustytires
7 years ago

I love my garage compressor for rotating car tires, blowing out RV water lines for winterizing AND mounting countless tubeless tires over the years for a family of bikes. But for traveling my recently bought Topeak Booster pump is awesome. 1 pump to carry, and it has the chamber always with it. This Schwalbe can and the specy can are stupid, unless you build your own like the YouTube vid for a few bucks. There are multiple choices and certainly more on the way of combo pump/blasters imo totally worth it to get the Booster, mine has worked 100% of the time AND it works as a regular pump go figure!

Brendan Connors
Brendan Connors
7 years ago

If you’re quick you can usually remove the pump and reinstall the core before losing all of the air.

Nuno Pinto
7 years ago

50€ or 50$ it’s too much money….but I would like to have one simple solution for the tubeless issue, without having to go to the nearest gas station to seat the bed

DelBoyIrl
DelBoyIrl
7 years ago

I have the Airshot version for more than a year now and it is brilliant. I had rims\tyre combinations that were particularly obstinate so I built a DIY kit with a 2L coke bottle and it mostly worked but it demanded speed as it leaked. I ended up using loads of CO2 so I bought this instead.
Absolutely, you don’t NEED this type of kit but it makes life so much easier especially at a race where you finally decide that the tyres you have fitted are just wrong. I’ve spent a lot more money on things that were a lot less useful.

Pinkp
Pinkp
7 years ago

$40 2 gallon compressor may be more usable than these “bike specific” devices. Regardless, it does not take much to sit a tire if you learn the right tricks and have basic mechanic skills. Like soapy water, bounce the wheel, push/pull in the right place. No need to remove the valve core.

Jesse Edwards
Jesse Edwards
7 years ago

I’ve been using an old $2 tube to seat my tires, which I then take out and then seal up the tire rather easily with a pump having only one side to re-seat. Seems simpler than a fairly expensive metal can.

Cheese
Cheese
7 years ago
Reply to  Jesse Edwards

Sure that’s a good way to seat the first bead, but if the second one’s stubborn then no bueno.

TimB
TimB
7 years ago

To get the required air flow from a compressor you need a fairly rage one and they are considerably more expensive than €60

ginsu
ginsu
7 years ago

I think tubeless is for idiots, I’ve had no problem removing valve cores and injecting sealant into tubes. Saves on the mess, and guess what, NO BURPING!

bbb
bbb
7 years ago

I’ve been using the same Coke bottle ghetto compressor for over 5 years… 60-80PSI is enough to seat every tyre/rim combo. I costs next to nothing and it does the same job.

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