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Specialized Globe Haul ST E-Cargo Bike Gets Official (and Fast!)

Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike in white, shown from angle
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Specialized teased with some overly cute, feature-laden photos last May and then again in October with more closeup details. Now, it’s official and the Specialized Globe Haul ST can be ordered online for delivery to your home or local bike shop, where you can choose to just pick it up or have them assemble it for you.

That is, of course, assuming you signed up for its wait list and got the preorder announcement yesterday. If not, the limited availability may be gone by the time you see this launch announcement … but let’s have a look anyway:

Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike in black, shown from side

Built on 20-inch wheels with fat 3.5-inch Carless Whisper tires with reflective striping, the alloy frame is a one-size-fits-all approach to compact cargo bikes. The ST refers to “Short Tail” (and I’m thinking a Long Tail model could follow), and indeed it’s meant to be highly maneuverable and easy to handle for any rider.

closeup details of new Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike

A dual-telescoping seatpost and adjustable handlebar height help riders from 4’5″ to 6’4″ fit on it, and a low step-over/through height makes it easy to get on and off, even when fully loaded.

The bike has a total cargo capacity of 419 pounds (including the rider), and the fully integrated rear rack can handle just about anything you can load on it — even another passenger.

closeup details of new Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike

A wide variety of mounts, including a mix of heavy-duty attachment points and standard water bottle bosses, will hold a wide variety of available aftermarket accessories. These include front and rear pannier adaptors, a rear passenger seat, handlebars, foot pegs, and a rear wheel cover (to keep passenger’s feet from hitting the spokes … trust me, it can happen and it’s not pleasant).

A MIK-compatible front rack will also be available, along with a “rack customization kit” with various adapters and hardware to help you fit just about anything you want to the front of the bike. There’s even a plug-in throttle you can add, which, presumably lets you scoot about town without pedaling.

closeup details of new Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike

Up front is a 1,500-lumen headlight (rear is 50 lumens) with a remote switch and multiple modes. Full coverage fenders hug the big tires, and huge 203mm brake rotors with hydraulic disc brakes bring the whole thing to a quick stop.

Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike in white, shown from side

The external 772Wh battery is IPX7 waterproof and powers a custom-tuned rear hub motor that can haul a full load for up to 60 miles … at up to 28 mph as a Class 3 e-bike. A handlebar remote cycles through five pedal assist modes and its display shows battery level, estimated range remaining, and odometer.

Specialized Globe Haul ST e-cargo bike in white, shown from angle

Drivetrain is a microSHIFT ADVENT nine-speed mix with a SunRace 11-36 cassette and a KMC chain with an anti-rust coating. Cranks are generic alloys with square taper BB, 160mm crank arms, and a torque sensor built in to provide smooth power delivery. Specialized flat pedals, Body Geometry Comfort Gel saddle, and slip-on grips come standard.

The frame comes with a lifetime warranty, and the electronics get a 2-year warranty. MSRP is $2,700 and it’s only available in the USA at launch.

Specialized.com

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16 Comments
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Mark
Mark
11 months ago

45 km/h for folks who are typically not used to those speeds on bikes is completely absurd thank god i dont see this here.

Dinger
Dinger
11 months ago
Reply to  Mark

This concern has existed since the earliest days of e-bikes but self preservation instinct has prevented this from being a problem. People who aren’t comfortable with these speeds simply don’t ride that fast.

Mark
Mark
11 months ago
Reply to  Dinger

I have actually seen the reverse in some instances. I understand your point but the reality is that they often do not care about their environment. I adore cargo bikes, there is no one out there who is a first time owner who can handle 45k hour speeds in an urban environement. This is akin to a teen driver in a F-250. I get it for long flat lonely distances. In paris or stockohlm this bike simply just rides in the flow, the only way faster is to cut everyone off.

Tomi
Tomi
11 months ago
Reply to  Mark

Actuallly it depends of the infrastructure. I am both a cyclist and a motorcycle rider. I own what we call maxi scooters in europe.

bicycle infrastructure is lacklustre around here. I am not that much afraid having been riding on the roads for more than 30y since I was an 11y old boy but I definitely feel safer riding closer to the 50kph city speed limit on my motorcycle than when I am riding my bicycle between 20 and 25kph with my girlfriend on shared lanes.

Being able to follow the flow of the motorized traffic and being overtaken less gives you sometimes a bit more security. That is if you don’t ride stupidly and keep safe braking distance. Sadly some people riding unrestricted and uninsured e-bikes and e-scooter do not care but these are the kind of people who used to mod their moped to go faster and they are driving stupidly whatever vehicule they are using. At least on an e-bike they aren’t making so much noise, this is a relief for people living in the city.

Cory
Cory
11 months ago
Reply to  Mark

That’s why there are various levels…I have a Specialized e-bike and have been an avid rider since the 80’s…I wish the bikes went faster.

Fake Namerton
Fake Namerton
11 months ago

Cool bike, hard to justify over a Honda Navi for $800 less but I could see it being a good option in Europe or if you live in an apartment and don’t have a garage/secure parking space. Still would get the heebie jeebies locking up a $2700 bicycle outside the grocery store though.

Kjoro
Kjoro
11 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

paying for gas, mixing oil, breathing the pollution? Worth the $800.

Gregg
Gregg
11 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

A Honda Navi will require licensing (and insurance in some states) with the DMV as it is a street-legal motorcycle. Then you gotta service it. The first oil change and valve inspection is 600 miles, oil change, valve inspection, and fuel strainer are cleaned every 2,500 or six months. You will run thru that $800 pretty quickly. But, if you actually do need to go up to 50 MPH or so, then the Navi is what you want.

Dinger
Dinger
11 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

A Honda Navi has dealership prep and delivery costs that raise its price a great deal from MSRP. It can’t be parked inside or many places outside that a bicycle can. It can’t be ridden legally in bike lanes and trails. It requires gasoline and a license + insurance. I’m a big fan of small-displacement motorcycles too but can see why e-bikes are growing despite the existence of scooters.

Cory
Cory
11 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

Big difference in many countries likely…licensing it and having a driver’s license.

Tomi
Tomi
11 months ago
Reply to  Fake Namerton

I think it is more in the competition of electric mopeds such as the Niu NQi to be honest. And I understand all those expensive e-bike are a hard sell over any decent electric moped. They are slower, you can’t legally take a passenger (I almost got fined 3 times for having my daughter standing on my rear rack by the local police) and the cargo capacity may not even be that great. This is crazy the amount of shit I can get on my (albeit slightly bigger and gas powered) maxi scooter. I can put a 6 pack of water bottles on the foot floor, a grocery bag on top of it, another one on the top case, some additionnal stuff on side bags + my backpack.

You need a bigger cargo bike or a trailer to do that kind of stuff and/or being able to have a passenger (and I am not even sure having a passenger in a urban arrow/bullitt’s cargo bed is even legal here).

Unless you have 2 small kids Cargo e-bike need to be sub 2k$/€ to look like a good investment. I am contemplating selling my piaggio but I have a hard time convincing myself an e-bike is a good options. So many times I need to pickup my gf or a daughter in a place they didn’t go by bike on their own for lack of secure place to store their bike.

N C
N C
11 months ago

Are you sure that’s a Specialized for only $2700? RPB just released the Rad Runner 3 Plus for $2300, with similar but lower grade specs, and I’d definitely pay the $400 premium to get the Spesh with its 69lb increase in weight capacity and 28mph top speed.

Doug
Doug
11 months ago

Most people that get 28mph Class 3 e-bikes think that the bike will bring them up to 28mph with ease but that is not the case. Most e-bikes with that rating especially Specialized don’t get to those speeds without the rider pushing it that fast. Since this bike goes over the Class 1 rating of 20mph it has to get the Class 2/3 rating. Considering the weight of this bike and the average consumer of that would purchase this it’ll be quite difficult to bring this bike to 28mph. Specialized is doing what Rad Power is doing but better and safer so the US market and bike shops have a better experience than the poor quality e-bikes that are floating about that have no support and no bike shops that want to work on them.

baba
baba
11 months ago
Reply to  Doug

Having test ridden many Specialized e-bikes over the year, I agree with them not easily maxing out their speed limiter, if ever. But also, I test rode this one the other day and it will quickly and easily hit 28mph on power mode 2 of 5. Although it is a cargo bike that was completely unloaded. On power mode 5 it wants to wheelie without you asking for it.

Lars
Lars
11 months ago

Are you sure the ST refers to “Short Tail” and not “Step Through”, as in step through frame?

EBikeDouche
EBikeDouche
11 months ago

Hub motor on a cargo bike makes almost no sense until you realise that the big red S might be in some hot fiscal water and need to fleece some consumers real quick to help pay for that 15 million dollar pearl izumi office in Colorado…

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