Home > Bike Types > Cyclocross

Spotted: Is a New Cannondale SuperSix Evo in the Works?

Anton Cannondale Super Six SE:CX in the snow
21 Comments
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

It looks as though Cannondale has an update on the way for its gravel/cyclocross machine, the SuperSix Evo. How do we know? Check out some FloBikes coverage from the past couple of cyclocross races and world cups.

Anton Cannondale Super Six SE:CX in the snow

You’ll notice that some of the Deschacht Hens Maes CX Team sports an excellent blue and yellow team frame, but the one-piece bar/stem has cable routing that goes nicely through the frame and fork. The team also covered the cable port in the fork. Deschacht Hens Maes rider Anton Ferdinande, shared photos, and you can clearly see the updates.

Anton Cannondale Super Six SE:CX

New Cannondale SuperSix Evo

Why? If you’ve followed the updates from most cyclocross and gravel bikes (like the Canyon Inflite), manufacturers are now looking to make the sleekest and cleanest-looking silhouette possible.

This means hiding the cables and adding as much integration as possible. The internal cable routing makes for easier shouldering, no brake hose fighting, and a slightly more aero machine overall.

Anton Cannondale Super Six SE:CX internal

What does this mean for the Cannondale SuperSix Evo SE?

Like many other US manufacturers (excluding Trek), Cannondale have combined their gravel and cyclocross offerings. The SuperSix Evo SE is the fast, lightweight gravel race bike in the Cannondale roster.

The geo is still great for cyclocross; the only real change from year to year has been the tire clearance and dropped seat stays. That said, Cannondale may be using this update as a time to refresh some pieces of the SuperSix Evo SE/CX frame that might be outstanding.

We loved the Cannondale SuperSix Evo CX we reviewed – check it out here.

Anton B:w Cannondale

What’s on our wish list for the new SuperSix Evo SE/CX?

First, I would love to see the SI-dished wheels disappear. This upgrade is problematic for a cyclocross athlete who doesn’t have a full truck of wheels at their disposal or a gravel racer looking for a wheel swap from neutral support after a flat.

Cannondale Synapse Smart Sense quarter
Cannondale Synapse with Smart Sense, BSA bottom bracket, and non-Si wheels.

A threaded BSA bottom bracket would be nice. The newest Cannondale Synapse came equipped with outstanding specs, and the BSA bottom bracket was one of them. The BSA bottom bracket style allows for easy component swaps and maintenance on the user end. Because gravel and cyclocross racers can roast a bottom bracket faster than you can say, “What pressure are you running?”

Cannondale SuperSix EVO bar tech
Current Cannondale one-piece bar stem routing for the SuperSix EVO

Easy to route/service internal cable routing. On the service side, internally routed cables can be a nightmare. Swapping out a headset can be a longer process than needed and could mean skipping service intervals for riders. Easy stem swaps and size adjustments can be just as painful. We hope the new SuperSix Evo SE/CX comes with thoughtful internal routing that won’t take a week at the shop for a 10mm stem swap.

Anton B:w Cannondale bar:stem

What’s next?

For now, we must sit, wait and see what comes. If you’re an eagle eye with spec, watch the cyclocross races and the athletes’ Instagram profiles for a sneak peek of what might be coming.

What would you like to see in the new Cannondale Supersix Evo — Let us know in the comments!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

21 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Cannondale
Cannondale
1 month ago

Its SuperX not SuperSix

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago
Reply to  Cannondale

No its not…SuperX was the last model….New one has been the SuperSix Evo CX/SE for 3-4 years…

SteveT
SteveT
1 month ago
Reply to  Cannondale

No it’s not dummy. 🙂

Anton Pavar
Anton Pavar
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveT

Andrew is correct… a quick search on their website before insulting someone would be a good idea next time!

jonathan
jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveT

that may be true, but it’s also not correct to say “The SuperSix EVO is cannondales gravel/cx bike” That is true of the SuperSix Evo CX. The SuperSix Evo is and has been their flagship road bike for more than a decade.

Daniel
Daniel
1 month ago

frame looks pretty much same. I have a current S6 EVO CX and headtube looks to be allready prepared for delta steering headset top cap. So my opinion is, that there is only new fork with delta steerer tube

Marc Smith
Marc Smith
1 month ago

if I could retrofit an integrated bar stem on my current CX I would be happy, with just a little cap on my down tube. A simple retrofit option would be great on the cockpit, BB and SI dish wheel not so huge for me as 2 sets of wheel covers pretty much all my use. Its an awesome N just one bike. I really like it. I really hate consuming endless bikes.

Blackwater Bicycles
1 month ago

I am surprised these companies do not keep the port on the top of the down tube to give customers the option to run it through the head tube or route it a little more traditionally into the down tube.

Jonas l
Jonas l
1 month ago

The port on the down tube is still there. so you can route gearcables/rear hose however you want. Just the front brake you can’t choose. As one the SuperSIX Evo roadbike.

Blackwater Bicycles
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonas l

Thanks Jonas I, from the side shots, it looked like it was removed.

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago

Old News – the team riders have been riding SuperSix Evo CX frames with new forks with the Delta steer for 2 seasons now (Check out Clara Honsinger’s last (maybe even last 2) SS Evo CX (in the Stars N Stripes) .

As far as I’m aware (I have some inside sources) the only change out right now is a new Delta Steerer….. thats not to say that revisions to the frame itself aren’t possibly in the works though.

Marc Smith
Marc Smith
16 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

Sorry man but not a single picture with internal cables on her multiple bikes.

Mike
Mike
1 month ago

Seems like the title is slightly misleading since this article talks about a new CX SS

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago

SI is gone for the new ones.

Not sure how you can spin a threaded alu BB insert bonded into a carbon cross frame as a good thing, or easy to maintain. Mud, sand, grit and water ingress are a given, and the choice of a bonded threaded insert will make serviceability and potentially frame life much shorter.

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago
Reply to  Oliver

I’d be curious about whether you’re right about SI being gone. Are you sure of this? I think it will be gone soon, but I don’t know if I expect it to be gone on this next evolution….

Andrew
Andrew
1 month ago

Its funny, for me the AI offset wasn’t a huge deal, ( I re-dished two back wheels from previous bikes in less than an hour) but I also don’t presently own any disc-brake Road bikes. I suppose this might become more annoying when I get back up to date and I can’t share rear wheels….

jonathan
jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew

Scalpel HT ditched SI

Greg
Greg
1 month ago

The prior gen Evo road bike had internal cable routing ahead of the headset, foregoing the need to disconnect cables when servicing or replacing the bearings. The latest version with the Delta steerer tube places the hoses within the bearings. But in doing so, they were able to skip the problematic fork steerer stop, which was probably a much bigger issue.
I just wish all the manufacturers would incorporate supplemental lip seals for both sides of each headset bearing. It’s not hard to do, it adds minimal drag if they care enough to give themselves enough space to actually put something in there instead of retrofitting, and it would be hugely beneficial.

FattyHugi
FattyHugi
1 month ago

I love the the AI wheel dish on my F-SI! No rear wheel has more evenly angled and tensioned spokes on both sides of the wheel (even more so if you use a 3mm asymmetrical rim for your wheel build), you can get the wheel almost as perfectly symmetrical as your front wheel AND still have room for your massive 12 speed cassette. I only have one set of wheels made anyway: 1 – because it’s all I can afford, and 2 – because I have NEVER had a wheel break, just flats that I can just throw a tube in on the trail. Also AI allows me to run 2.4 inch wheels and a double crank ring up front if were to so choose. Even for teams racing AI version Cannondale’s they are gonna have loads of AI wheels ready for pit swaps or whatever. Like the Lefty it’s not an issue, never was. It’s Cannondale they are not necessarily ahead of the curve, more like the knight on the chessboard of bike tech. They move unpredictably, come up with ideas you don’t see coming like (Alex Pong’s engineered Magic crank-to-spindle six-curved-splines interface) the “keystone” of the BB30. Now almost every other bike manufacturer has adopted BB30 for professional riding (Nino ditched Scott’s use of GXP for the bombproof higher performing BB30 for his World Cup and Olympic racing), even SRAM Dub spindles are the exact same tech as BB30, they just took off 1mm of the diameter to 29mm so they didn’t have to pay royalties or to pretend it’s not BB30. If you buy Cannondale, you get their proprietary quirks and what I see as the benefits, or you buy a Scott or Specialized that follow the pack.
The pressfit hate is a crock too, I have never had a problem with Cannondale’s PF bottom brackets, (granted I don’t let bike shops put my cranks together as I find they often cut corners to save time) but I always follow the manual and grease the bearings properly and make sure the bearings are set perfectly linear, i also freeze up the spindle so it shrinks a bit and I can slide it to wear it needs to be without disrupting the bearings. then as it warms up it locks in to the bearing inner races. Never had one creak from pressfit. I think people don’t like pressfit because they aren’t as simple and convenient as just screwing your oversized BB30 bearing in; BSA are great for bad home mechanics or rushed bike shop/bad mechanics.
Alas tho, Cannondale does sometimes cave into the crowd. They are ditching AI because of the whiners, For instance the newish Scalpel HT is non AI (along with all the 2024 bikes, also is the Scalpel HT replacing the AI F-SI for xc racing?) which is a cleaned up carbon version of Cannondales Trail: dropped seatstays like everybody is doing (of course Scott’s design team rushed to drop the new Scale’s seatstays after the Scalpel HT was revealed). Next thing Cannondale will add BSA. While the Ocho is an excellent performing fork and looks absolutely stunning my booted Lefty Carbon Speed 110 out perform it and EVERY other shock in XC/All-Mountain riding, and it only weighs 1,169 grams. Even my aluminum Lefty PBR 120MM travel double Crown Booted Lefty only weighs a hair over 1400 grams – less than the single crown carbon Ocho with 100MM travel- granted the Ocho is an extreme improvement on the 2013-2019 Hybrid Lefty’s; those boat anchors sucked abominably in every way imaginably.

Andy
Andy
1 month ago

What about an SL mtb?

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.