Microshift Mega 40 wide range mountain bike cassette and rear derailleur mountain bike group

If there was one other trend at Taipei Cycle Show to contend with 27.5+, it was wide range cassettes and systems for mountain bike. We’ve already shown you Praxis’ new cassette, but it was far from the only new option.

Microshift, which is largely known for their smaller shifters and less expensive options found on youth bikes, offers quite a bit more than that, though. Their new Mega 40 cassette and derailleur jump head first into the wide range mountain bike drivetrain group with a systems approach. The tooth counts on the cassette use a very smooth growth rate from 11 to 40, are offered in both 10- and 11-speed options and the derailleur has a parallelogram that’s specific to this cassette’s tooth profiles, so it’s going to set up without a lot of fiddling.

The best part? It’ll integrate just fine into an otherwise Shimano based system to offer an inexpensive upgrade…

Microshift Mega 40 wide range mountain bike cassette and rear derailleur mountain bike group

The cassettes use two different construction methods, offering a choice of weights and prices. All of them use steel cogs leading up to a 7075 alloy 40-tooth one at the top.

microshift-mega-40-wide-range-mountain-bike-cassette-derailleur06

The differences are in the carrier. The lighter alloy models use an aluminum carrier for the larger cogs, which saves a considerable amount of weight. The all-steel ones use individual cogs and spacers. The new Mega 40 cassettes are the ones showing 40 as the top cog (obviously), and there are four total models – two 11-speed, and two 10-speed.

Weights are a little heavier than competing offerings, but the cassette is probably going to be $100 or less.

Microshift Mega 40 wide range mountain bike cassette and rear derailleur mountain bike group

The long cage RD-M78L rear derailleur uses an offset upper pulley and specific parallelogram movement to pull itself smoothly along the surface of the cassette. It’s Shimano compatible, so you could easily drop the cassette and derailleur into any Shimano 10-speed system and increase the range without having to cobble together oversized cogs and maxed out B-screws. Derailleur weight is 206g.

Microshift Mega 40 wide range mountain bike cassette and rear derailleur mountain bike group

Shifters are darn impressive, too, pushing through 5 cogs at a time. The only potential drawback is that the forward trigger to release cable only clicks backward, so you’ll need to be able to get your finger down there between the brake lever and the bar (as opposed to Shimano’s dual-direction movement or SRAM’s rear facing thumb push button). Shifting was crisp and precise on the demo setup shown at the top of this post, making us think this would be a cheap, easy way for non-brand snobs to convert to a 1×11 drivetrain.

From what we can tell, this derailleur is not likely to work with Shimano road shifters only because Shimano’s road shifters are not compatible with their current 10-speed MTB derailleurs due to cable pull differences. The cassette could work on either, but you’d need to make sure your derailleur will clear the 40T cog if you’re looking to build a gravel or cyclocross bike with a bit extra range.

Microshift.com.tw

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Birdman
Birdman
7 years ago

Nice 11 speed cassette, nice M9000 or XD drive alternative. Their 10 speed seems like it just uses the 11 speed cassette and dumped the 19th cog, not even spacing like the Praxis offering.

Yahsper
Yahsper
7 years ago

Haha. Non brand-snobs.

Tom
Tom
7 years ago

Good looking product. There 4/5 jump is oddly-spaced, but possibly preferably to the Praxis 1/2 jump of 6 teeth. A few questions:

Could you post comparative XT weights (Google found me about 10 different values — don’t know which are “real”).

Will the 11-speed version fit on a standard freehub body, or is the XD Driver required?

Any chance the 40t is replaceable on the lighter version?

craigsj
craigsj
7 years ago

Tooth count on jumps doesn’t matter, it’s the percentages that do. This one has a massive jump from 17 to 21, even worse than Praxis.

EP
EP
7 years ago

Does the mech have any sort of clutch or chain retension features?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Awesome!!! This will make a great 11speed touring cassette to run with a road double and SRAM rear derailleur. I can’t imagine a Shimano long cage rear(11spd) will clear that cog unless you’ve got a crazy long hanger though.

WV Cycling
7 years ago

I’m still running a ghetto double setup on my MTB – 34/20 – 11-32

I rarely ever imagine needing anything more than my 20×32, even living right on the Appalachian mountains. If I had a 20×40, that would only be a 0.125 increase?decrease? in gear ratio. Or 0.29 gear inches.

I think I’d rather be walking at those speeds.

I love my “tighter” 10spd cassette.

http://gear-calculator.com/?GR=DERS&KB=20,34&RZ=32,40&UF=2309&TF=60&SL=2.5&UN=MPH

Antoine
Antoine
7 years ago

Curious if this is compatible with a sram or shimano 11 road shifter, i could go 1X road that way.

robert
robert
7 years ago

the shimano MTB 10 pulls approx 33mm of cable over the spacing of the cassette. the 11 sp pulls 25mm of cable….
now on the flip side if you put a 11 sp shifter on an old 8/9/10 sp shimano rear der, you now successfully have 8 speed.. both have a 2.5mm cable pull per click…. i do this on my training bike, because 8 speed shifts really well, chains/cassettes last 3 times longer, and its super cheap to replace. its perfect for cross as well

James S
James S
7 years ago

This is great, but I keep wondering when SRAM or Shimano will finally drop their own affordable 11-40 or 11-42 cassettes into the fray. Right now all these little companies are exploiting this niche while the big boys sit on their thumbs. Where’s the X9 or XT 11-40 10 speed cassette? Seems like a no brainer to me.

Frippolini
Frippolini
7 years ago

Does anyone know how far / close Microshift is to Ultegra / Force / Athena weight and performance? Considering the price for Microshift, they should with a wider distribution give good competition to the larger players (if their performance is close enough).

anonymous
anonymous
7 years ago

That’s odd asking about the road groups when the post is mostly about MTB.

No specs are out yet for the new Microshift road groups, but Microshift always tries to keep their weight at around Ultegra or better levels, and it will feature Campagnolo Ultra-shift style shifting like Chorus, rather than the Power-shift of Athena. Also Shimano compatibility as well. I would not be surprised if the shifters ended up between Shimano and Campy in weight, since the Campy design they’re copying has always tended to be lighter, even at the low end.

For me, that pretty much kills any reason to buy anything below Chorus, and seriously makes me reconsider if Chorus along with the Campagnolo only compatibility is worth the premium over the new Microshift.

The big problem for me is that Microshift isn’t cheap after being distributed by QBP, just like Campagnolo seems to go for twice as much in the States.

Mike
Mike
7 years ago

Bearings Inside??? Stop the presses!

Local Dutchman
Local Dutchman
7 years ago

Funny, even the modelnumbers nearly match the Shimano ones, like “RD” for rear derailleur.

Cassettes look a lot like Shimano hyperglide cassettes too, isn’t that patented anymore?

Pistolero
Pistolero
7 years ago

I love china!!! we had to wait for the chinese to beat sram snob prices and shimano late entrace to the wide-range cassettes… Very good. I might jump the single ring fashion soon thank to the cheap chinese. Great, tired of the cycling is the new golf stupidity.

anonymous
anonymous
7 years ago

Microshift is Republic of China (Taiwan)

Sean
Sean
7 years ago

Microshift is a Taiwanese company. A lot of sram is also made in Taiwan. China is a different country, it is like calling America mexican.

Mr. Know
Mr. Know
7 years ago

@Antoine Just wait. 1x road is just around the corner. I live in Indy and can only say that its gonna be here sooner than you think. Look at Specialize, they already have the lunch racer.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Pistolero…high end racing gear has ALWAYS BEEN EXPENSIVE and the stuff gets cheaper as the NEWER expensive stuff, replaces the older expensive stuff. Its the same in every sport. You can buy a complete set off golf clubs for under $200 or a single club for well over $10,000. You can also buy a mountain bike for $500 or you can now buy derailleur pulleys for $1000

fib
fib
7 years ago

Am I the only one to think that “Mega 40” is the worst model name ever, even if it’s cool in green?

dorkdisk
dorkdisk
7 years ago

Is the shifter a Rapidfire Plus type? (trigger finger)

If so, is the Shimano patent expired?

Bazz
Bazz
7 years ago

Where’s the clutch on the MTB rear derailleur! Darn. If there was a clutch I’d be in on a new 1 x 11 setup immediately.

Craig
Craig
6 years ago

The Shimano trigger shifter came out in 1992, and Hyperglide was maybe the previous year or even 1990? As the Campag road shifters came out around the same time I’m guessing that makes some of these patents are now expired as that’s over 20 years ago.