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TPE17: X-Fusion teases inverted long-travel gravel suspension fork, plus $200 dropper seatpost & more

A-pro full suspension gravel road bike with X-Fusion Ranger inverted suspension fork
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Yes, this is the world’s first full suspension gravel road bike, created by A Pro as a showcase for their frame manufacturing expertise. Providing the bounce was an existing ultralight X-Fusion rear shock and an all-new, possibly 2018 inverted suspension fork called the Ranger.

The uppers are full carbon fiber, one piece with the steerer tube. It’s showing external compression and rebound controls and inside uses the same tech they developed for the Revel X inverted XC suspension fork. Weight and pricing are unknown, but we did get a few more details from them, along with pics and specs on a few more new products…

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

Ranger shown here has 32mm stanchions and 80mm travel, which we’d consider “long travel” for a gravel bike, and there are 50 and 60 options planned. It’s looking more and more like what you could do by simply putting drop bars on an old 29er to create a sweet monster cross bike.

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

x-fusion ranger gravel bike suspension fork with inverted carbon crown and steerer

The dropouts clamp on, same as with the Revel X, and they say that allows them to ensure each side is perfectly aligned, which keeps the legs moving in perfect, linear parallel for the smoothest action.

X-Fusion’s people say they’re planning to have OEM samples delivered to customers by Eurobike.

While the inverted fork was their show bait (which, oddly enough wasn’t even in their own booth), the real show stopper was their new Manic dropper seatpost. At just $199, it brings the cost of entry for adding an adjustable height seatpost way, way down. And should the insides fail, they offer a drop-in $25 replacement cartridge that replaces everything internal.

The cable pulls a linkage-driven system, a unique feature among mechanically actuated posts, which results in an incredibly light feel at the lever.

For now, it’s a 125mm travel post, but there’s a 150mm coming. Lest you think the price dictates quality, they say it’s tested to withstand five years of tow-hour rides five days per week. Think that should cover it?

It’s just about the quality of drop, either. They used an easily adjustable seat post clamp, with bolt angles fine tuned to avoid seat creaking at the saddle rails, which is something they had on the Hi-Lo post. And the remote lever can mount on top of bottom and you can adjust its angle thanks to a simple ball joint mount. Weight is 630g, available in 30.9 and 31.6 diameters.


Back to forks: You’ll find black anodized stanchions on their forks now, as well as the rear shocks. It’s purely cosmetic, but is sticking with modern tastes and just started shipping like that this year. For entry level, the RC32 (shown) is OEM focused, and gets 9mm QR dropouts. It’ll be available for the Asian aftermarket customer, everywhere else is OEM only.

XFusionShox.com

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28 Comments
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silverlining
silverlining
5 years ago

Well, at least it’s not an e-bike.

ELEVEN_g
5 years ago

Is this called full circle?

Guest
Guest
5 years ago
Reply to  ELEVEN_g

No…it’s official. The bike industry has gone full retard

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
5 years ago
Reply to  Guest

Yeah, the past few years have seen the reinvention of the touring, hybrid, and 29er niches.

ignis
ignis
5 years ago

My weight weenie disease needs weight measurement before calling it “ultralight”. Thank you for your comprehension.

Guest
Guest
5 years ago

“Another option we’re developing in the full suspension gravel bike range will have flat bars and wider tyres. We’re not sure what to call it yet but we think it will really take off”

Noah
Noah
5 years ago
Reply to  Guest

That could be revolutionary

Mike
Mike
5 years ago
Reply to  Noah

I really hope it has a suspension stem

Fantomphish
Fantomphish
5 years ago

What about the UD fork they teased for years for MTB? Where’s that?

JNH
JNH
5 years ago
Reply to  Fantomphish

There’s been at least one production run of Revel inverted forks, they’re out there on a lucky few people’s bikes, but for whatever reason it is just few.

charlie charalambous
charlie charalambous
5 years ago
Reply to  JNH

If you really want one iron stable bikes in Singapore had one revel the last time I checked 3 days ago for $1450. They are not making their way to US and European markets as ‘they don’t work as proposed’ whatever that means.

duder
duder
5 years ago

They’ve been talking about that dropper forever. When can you actually buy it?

Tim
Tim
5 years ago

Upside down forks are heavier and torsionally flexier than rightside up ones. That’s definitely the case with the RS1, which is heavier and flexier than a SID.

larry
larry
5 years ago

Finally, a real dirt road bike. We’ve been using Epics for years, but they are overkill. A carbon fiber bike is a joke on rocky, rutted, dirt roads and a full sus race bike will blow it away, but that is more bike than necessary for the job. About 50-80mm of travel is all that a real gravel road bike needs — but on both ends, not just the front.

I know people here will tend to dismiss this comment, but if they can turn this into an e-bike version then I am seriously interested. The Levo is the only serious long distance, fun-to-ride, dirt road bike, but again, it’s also seriously overkill.

Dan
Dan
5 years ago

But the RS-1 is amazing at small bumps which would be great on a gravel bike.

Seraph
Seraph
5 years ago
Reply to  Dan

It also requires a proprietary hub which is never a good thing.

Tim
Tim
5 years ago
Reply to  Dan

It also costs around 1800 bucks while being heavier than other forks with more travel.

Daniel Burge
5 years ago

If that is the world’s first full suspension gravel road bike then the bike I ride everyday does not exist.

Drew Happerstein.
Drew Happerstein.
5 years ago

WHY AREN’T PEOPLE PULLING SHIMANO’S STUPID ORANGE DISC BRAKE WARNING LABELS OFF FOR ALL THESE SHOWS????!?!?!?!?!?
Anyway, carry on.

ascarlarkinyar
ascarlarkinyar
5 years ago

Will this fit the new yet to be released gravel plus size tires in 2.1 to 2.4?

32/20
32/20
5 years ago

Re: @ Guest:
“Never go full retard.”
–Lincoln Osiris

Guest
Guest
5 years ago
Reply to  32/20

It’s too late…it’s all Sean Penn up in here

Roy
Roy
5 years ago

…. I mean, Moots has had YBB for years…

invertedprolapse
invertedprolapse
5 years ago

did you know that e mountain bikes are huge in Europe?

dkeezy
dkeezy
5 years ago
Reply to  dkeezy

Point being: I don’t think this is the first “full suspension gravel road bike.”

Groghunter
Groghunter
5 years ago

BikeYoke uses the same mechanism as the dehy on their revive dropper… which is linkage activated. & you can actually buy those.

peter
peter
5 years ago

at least it looks alright

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