Zipp introduces Rotor Protectors, plus more Accessory additions

Zipp-Rotor-Protectors-small

While the Zipp brand tends to be bring aerodynamics to mind, especially with regards to carbon wheels, they do also make some solid everyday components like bars, stems, and seatposts and offer a wide range of accessories from valve extenders to bottle cages to solve some everyday needs. Zipp just sent us a press release that mostly consisted of these same basic accessories in some slightly updated or expanded configurations, but what caught our attention were the forthcoming Rotor Protectors. While throwing spare cross wheels around for the past couple of years to and from races, the thought of keeping the rotors out of harms way sounds intriguing. Join us after the break to take a better look, and to get pricing and availability, also for the other accessory updates…

Zipp-Rotor-Protectors

The Zipp Rotor Protector is designed to keep our rotors safe in transit. They are a neoprene cover that slips over the rotor and quick release (or thru-axle) to prevent contamination from dirt and grease, for example when the wheels are leaned up against a bike’s chain. They appear to only really cover the outer surface of the rotor, with a drawstring that cinches down on the inside of the rotor to hold it in place. They will be available from January 2016 in 140mm and 160mm sizes for $20/21€/£16 each.

While we like the idea of a protector, it seems that this soft cover won’t do anything to protect the rotor from something pushing against it and knocking it out of true (in our experience the biggest issue in transit). And this design looks to actually require a good bit of fitting and adjusting with your hands right next to the rotor, opening up several more possibilities for transferring the oils from our grubby little hands to the rotor (probably our second biggest worry with disc brake rotors. Let us know in the comments if you think this solves a problem, or opens up another can of worms.

Zipp-Tangente-valve-extenders_for-removable-core-Presta-valves Zipp-Tangente-valve-extenders_for-fixed-core-Presta-valves

As for the other accessories, Zipp has added a cheaper set of Tangent valve extenders for removable and fixed valve core tubes and tubulars to join the extenders they already had been offering made in cooperation with Silca. The removable core extenders are to come in kits of 3 (one for each wheel and your spare tube) plus a pair of aluminum wrenches, and are tailored for length to go with their wheelsets. Available in February, the 303/60/404 kit (58mm deep rim) will sell for $25/26€/£20 (or $9/9€/£7 a piece); the 808 kit (82mm deep rim) will sell for  $27/28€/£22 (or $10/10€/£8 a piece); and the 1080 kit (108mm deep rim): $32/33€/£26 (or $12/13€/£10 a piece).

For fixed, non-removable valve cores the extenders come one at a time. Also available in February, the 404 and shallower extenders will sell for $9/9€/£7 a piece, the 808 ones for $11/11€/£9 a piece, and the 1080 extenders for $12/13€/£10 a piece. Both types of extenders include 3mm hex key tooling inside of the extender’s tube so they can be tightened easily to the valve.

Zipp-Tangente-Silca-valve-extenders_for-removable-core-Presta-valves Zipp-Tangente-butyl-tubes-with-removable-core-Presta-valves

The Silca valve extenders carry over for removable valve core tubes and tires, and have the same 24mm rubber extender gasket to eliminate rattling in the wheels. They are already available and also come in kits of 3 with a plastic installation tool provided. Extender kits in 34, 45, 60 & 75mm lengths all retail for the same price of $45/47€/£36.

Adding to the valve extenders are some new Tangente branded butyl inner tubes with aluminum Presta valves and removable cores to work with the extenders. They come with 37mm valve stems, 0.85mm tube walls, and in two sizes for 20-28mm tires (72g) or for 28-32mm tires (96g). Both sizes will sell for $10/10€/£8 from January 2016.

Zipp-SL-Speed-carbon-bottle-cage_red Zipp-Alumina-alloy-bottle-cage_silver

The 18g SL Speed Carbon cage at $75/78€/£60 now gets new white and red colors to go with the standard black. And the more affordable 27g alloy Alumina cage adds a clear anodized version to add to the original anodized black for $35/37€/£29.

 

Zipp.com

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23 Comments
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Ck
Ck
6 years ago

I like the concept, but have to agree that I wouldn’t risk installing these without wearing gloves and they need some rigidity to protect from bending.

And someone else needs to make one that isn’t $20 each thanks to the Zipp branding tax.

Rixter
Rixter
6 years ago

The PlanetBike carbon cage is nearly the same weight but $25 less

Mike
Mike
6 years ago

For the disc covers, why not just a full wheel bag? The fabric tented over the quick release to the tire probably provide as much, if not more protection. Honestly, I’ve never transported anything but rim-brake wheels in a wheel bag though.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

So over those couple years of throwing spare cross wheels around, have you actually had any rotor damage? If so, what exactly happened as I don’t see this doing anything but protecting other things FROM your rotor – not protecting your rotor to any real degree.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

nevermind – its protection from dirt and debris…
note to self: read.

Axel
Axel
6 years ago

I usually transport bikes in boxes where the rotor has to sit to the outside for the wheel to sit in properly. So I always remove the rotor for packing. A hard plastic rotor protector would seem to make more sense for any type of bike packing/bagging/boxing scenario. In my experience rotors getting bent is more of a risk than contamination.

Just my 2 cents anyway…

Pit
Pit
6 years ago

Gloves? Did I miss something?

Ham Jam
Ham Jam
6 years ago

Some people freak out if they touch a rotor and have to clean it with alcohol and a propane torch. I try not to touch them, but they get dirt on them from the trail. They also get oily water on them from road puddles. Seems to make no difference. They get cooked down a big hill and are good to go.

David
David
6 years ago

Disc cosies! Aren’t shower caps like $0.99 each?

Biff
Biff
6 years ago

Rotors survived years of mtb transport, but now on the road they require neoprene earmuffs?

pmurf
pmurf
6 years ago

Why not a rigid plastic deep-dish pie plate of sorts that covers the rotor and anchors to 3 spokes? Seems like that would have solved the issues of chemical protection AND physical protection.

Jack
Jack
6 years ago

This is the result of the net mags jumping on board with the industry’s attempt to sell new stuff and promoting disc brakes without any critical examination. Disc rotors are ULTRA sensitive to damage and a small bump at the coffee shop, that does nothing to an ordinary bike, can result in a very very irritating ride home with rubbing brakes.
On mountain bikes or commuters in wet places I can understand the strength and safety that discs bring but they are just not needed on road bikes.
On a road bike, discs make all sorts of simple things hard. Increasing the weight of frames, difficulty of wheel changes, much higher tensions on quick releases and sensitivity to tiny buckles and warps.
Like so many people, I am sick of “new” for the sake of sales. It is insulting to readers that no proper examination of the efficacy of disc brakes on road bike takes place. Just more “Yay for for our sponsors!”.
And yes I have owned many different bikes… let the personal abuse begin.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

Here it comes Jack – disc rotors may be ultra sensitive to damage, but they are not ultra sensitive nor easy to damage. They are steel and one has to hit them pretty hard to get them to bend. Very unlikely to happen at the coffee shop/brewery (where, believe it or not, MTB’ers have been parking their bikes for ages, disc brakes and all)
Now, whether one needs discs compared to whatever downsides is up to the rider. I personally don’t see rim brakes being eliminated from higher end road bikes for some time, so one is still free to choose.

JohnnyDoe
JohnnyDoe
6 years ago

Jack; Not all frames are heavier with disc. For example the the Cannondale Caad 12 frame with disc is lighter then the counterpart with rim brakes.
Give discs a go and you will find that they are really great. Maybe it doesn’t rain where you live but where I do it does and we have long hills… Seen many rims destroyed by simply braking down them…
And to be able to use the brakes with good power and modulation even in the rain is a fantastic experience…
Since I’ve been using disc brakes on my mountain bike for over 17 years now with little to no problems at all, I feel confident that they will work on a road bike as well.

Jack
Jack
6 years ago

I can’t resist.
JBikes’ if discs are so impregnable, what is this product all about?
JohnnyDoe, I acknowledged that disc have a place, it is the pushing from industry to make them ubiquitous that i object to. And I do own a disc brake bike, it takes twice the maintenance of any rim brake bike I have owned.

SB
SB
6 years ago

I’ve never had any issues with a pair of wheels with 8″ rotors in the hatch of a fairly small BMW station wagon.

I’ve also touched rotors in all kinds of ways, with no ill effects. The internet worries too much.

John
John
6 years ago

Love it or hate it, but that is the exact problem Shimano’s Centerlock solves: easy removal/reinstall of the rotor.

Pit
Pit
6 years ago

I like my mtb brakes razor precise and never rubbing. So like 10+ years of that and never worrying about dirt, etc. They are not that hard to true and cheap to replace so I still don’t get it why you would need gloves. Weird!

greg
greg
6 years ago

The tubes – pay thousands of dollars for extra speed and weight savings, add it all back with crappy tubes. Maxxis ultralight tubes= 0.45mm wall thickness, approximately 50g per tube. Specialized Turbo tubes= 0.6mm wall thickness extremely well constructed valve reinforcement area, pre-talced, 60ish grams per tube. Besides the weight, there is the lowered rolling resistance of a thinner tube, approaching that of latex tubes without the hassle of rapid air loss or carbon rim incompatibility. And for the record, don’t worry about puncture protection. Tests have shown a tube has to weigh a LOT more before it actually contributes to extra puncture protection. You don’t try to stop a bullet with thicker skin. You get a better vest.
Zipp should be making premium products, not me-too garbage. They’ve heard all this before. Why they don’t make it, who knows…

Jack
Jack
6 years ago

I’m just back from my first flight with my MTB and became a huge fan of centerlock rotors as I fiddled with the tiny bolts of my current 6-bolt King hubs. I’m going centerlock on my next wheels / bikes,

As far as the cozy goes, they are stupid. a flimsey black thing you need 1-2 times a year? guaranteed to get lost and you will end up simply being careful ( has worked for a few hundred trips with my MTB ) or using a plastic bag if you’re feeling anal.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

Jack – 11/18/15 – 7:54pm
I can’t resist. JBikes’ if discs are so impregnable, what is this product all about?

Making money. And as they said, protecting the disc from dirt and oil, not mechanical damage.

Morecore
Morecore
6 years ago

Brake rotor covers are about as cool as a set of copers for your skateboard trucks.

Sully
Sully
6 years ago

Finally a $20 piece of neoprene to protect my $16 Avid brake rotor!!