The new Pinarello Dogma F12 skips a number in the lineup, jumping toward the finish line with a pair of race-ready frames they say are lighter, stiffer, and more aero than ever. Developed with Team INEOS (formerly Sky), the new Dogma F12 is the new flagship road bike from Pinarello, and you’ll have your choice of rim and disc brake versions, both with more tire clearance, and a slew of paint options. Here’s how the F12 takes an asymmetric approach to the high-end road bike market…

Pinarello Dogma F12 carbon road bike

Pinarello has kept their foot on the gas hard for the better part of a decade, driven by their partnership with Team Sky and, now, Team Ineos. The previous-gen Dogma F10 saw cosmetic updates and a disc brake model. They’ve also dabbled quite a bit with various full suspension road bike designs for the Spring Classics, including the tech-heavy Dogma FS.

For 2019, the F10 is being replaced by the new Dogma F12. Pinarello tells us the key goal was to develop two different projects alongside one another – one with disc brakes, and one with rim brakes. They wanted both bikes to maintain the unique “Pinarello feeling” in both formats, while minimizing aerodynamic drag.

Let’s start with some numbers. Pinarello is claiming an 8 watt improvement over the Dogma F10 at 40km/h, or a one second gain per kilometer:

Some of this aero efficiency comes by way of new hidden cable routing and updated Talon Ultra handlebars. All cables are hidden on the disc brake models, and only the front brake cable is exposed on the rim brake bike.

The downtube continues with the recessed backside to help tuck the bottle and cage out of the air stream.

Pinarello states that lateral stiffness is up 10%, while the frame is 10% lighter (820g unpainted rim brake frame weight, 840g unpainted disc brake frame weight). This comes from internal improvements in frame construction, along with new shaping to the rear triangle, and refining their asymmetric frame design.

A new disc brake fork design makes a claimed 40% reduction in fork twist compared to the previous bike.

Braking performance was not ignored on the rim brake version, with a switch from single-bolt brakes to a direct-mount spec. This results in a claimed 12.5% increase in braking power in dry conditions, and a 25% increase in wet conditions.

The improved handlebar and aero cable routing meant that it’s no longer possible to use an inline cable adjuster for the front derailleur. To solve this, Pinarello developed a dedicated adjuster that fits in the E-Link slot, which normally houses a Shimano Di2 junction box.

The Dogma F12 E-Link is compatible with:

  • Shimano Di2: an adapter for junction EW-RS910 is included in the F12 kit
  • SRAM eTap AXS and eTap: a closed cap is included in the F12 kit
  • Campagnolo EPS: an adapter for the junction is included in the Campagnolo groupset kit
  • Mechanical: a FD adjuster is included in the F12 kit


None of this tech matters if the bike can’t fit your wheels and tires of choice, which Pinarello has addressed, moving the new bike to a guaranteed fit of at least 28mm.

“A current trend in the road bike world is a move towards wider tires. Even with the standard for pro riders still being 25mm tires, it is not unusual for others to equip a road racing bike with 28mm tires, especially if more comfort is required for longer distances. For that reason, the Dogma F12 and F12 Disk are designed to accommodate 28mm tire clearance. In reality the tire clearance is 37.5mm, however we have included consideration for the ISO 4210 norm, which specifies 4mm space between the tire and frame. Analyzing several tire and rim combinations we have given a declared value of 28m. In reality a declared 28mm tire can have a real width of 29.5mm. That’s the reason why the frame has been designed with 37.5mm clearance. This allowed the F12 frame to be compatible with all the most aerodynamic wheels that has a 30mm width.”

TL;DR. Where’s the video?

Frame Spec Detail

While we don’t have detailed build options yet, we know that mechanical and electronic options will be available from Shimano and Campagnolo, and electronic AXS-only from SRAM. Frame tech specs are as follows:

DOGMA F12 DISC BRAKE


– Carbon Torayca T1100 1K Dream Carbon with Nanoalloy Technology
– Asymmetric Frame
– Fork ONDA F12 with ForkFlap™
– TICR™ Total Internal Cable Routing
– E-Link™
– Drop in Bearing System 1” 1/2 – 1”1/2
– Italian thread BB
– Seatclamp TwinForce
– 3XAir™ two positions available for the second bottle
– FlatBack Profile
– UCI Approved
– RAD SYSTEM Disk brake
– Front Axle 100x12mm Shimano®
– Rear Axle 142x12mm Shimano®
– Disk Flat Mount max 160mm
– Max Tire 700x28mm
– Weight: 840g; raw frame, not painted

DOGMA F12 RIM BRAKE

– Carbon Torayca T1100 1K Dream Carbon with Nanoalloy Technology
– Asymmetric Frame
– Fork ONDA F12 with ForkFlap™
– TICR™ Total Internal Cable Routing
– E-Link™
– Drop in Bearing System 1” 1/2 – 1”1/2
– Italian thread BB
– Seatclamp TwinForce
– 3XAir™ two positions available for the second bottle
– FlatBack Profile
– Direct Mount Brake system
– UCI Approved
– Max Tire 700x28mm
– Weight: 820g; raw frame, not painted

Geometry & Sizing

The new Dogma F12 is available in an incredible 13 frame sizes, along with 16 bar sizes, for 208 possible combinations.

The Dogma F12 will be available beginning October 2019. Framesets are available for £5,000 in rim brake, or £5,200 for disc brake. Complete builds range from £9,000 to £12,000.

Pinarello.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. Beautiful bikes, awesome high tech! But the geometry on the sizes 42-50 is compromised. I have test ridden an older Dogma which has identical geo. These bike ride like boats. If you look at Specialized, Cervelo and few others. These brands used higher rake forks to lower the trail numbers below 60, 57-58 are the sweet spot. Using the same rake fork on all sizes and designing small bikes with 70° is a missed opportunity.

  2. If the aero difference really is 8 watts, how much of it came from hidden cables and the new bar stem unit? Probably nearly all of it, otherwise the F10 was just a styling exercise rather than a logical design. And while I consider the looks of the F12 to be a fail, at least they are offering room for bigger tires. But nothing out of the range of normal spec for aero road bikes these days. Won’t be selling a kidney to buy one of these.

  3. You know how cars were initially styled with clay models so they can pull graceful curves and get the shape right, and I guess now they do that in 3D?
    These bikes look like they were modelled via Origami and scrap cardboard and somehow Pinarello seem to have a 3D program that can replicate that effect.

    • It probably was modeled out of cardboard scraps then 3d scanned for final production. Every single angle on this bike looks so disjointed from anything else on it. Sure, I bet each angle has its own purpose but it looks like a Frankenstein heap of a design.

      I’m sure the F12 is faster/stiffer/lighter/whatever than the F10 which was faster/stiffer/lighter/whatever than the F8, but the F8 was such a bore of a bike when I had it that it left me with a bad taste for Pinarello. Luckily the name cache made it an easy resell. Having replaced it with a Cipollini with fragile carbon layup (which cracked last year), I will never spend money on Italian or “Italian” again.

  4. I do like my Tarmac SL6 and its understated aerodynamic refinement without looking like a car from the 1950s. Maybe if that approach was used Pinarello could have had lower ‘unpainted raw frame’ weights without the fins and fluting and curves of questionable affect.

    Who chooses based on ‘unpainted raw frame’ weights anyway? Add another 3-4 ounces depending on how luxurious a finish the design studio specifies. So over 900g to the purchaser.

    Just looked at a Wal-Mart Viathon… the painted 54cm with hangar and water bottle mounting hardware weighs 870g and the complete dura-ace disc model costs what the F12 frame does. Yikes. I hope Wal-Mart, err, Viathon sponsors a ProTour team.

  5. Wow. Another absurdly over priced (given it is made in China for about $200) bike. Which I guess is supposed to make the rider faster… but think about this- even if this bike makes you faster, are you really faster? (hint, NO!). To (semi) quote Jeff Foxworthy, if you buy this bike, you might (actually you do) have too much money for your own good.

  6. Iam not gonna spend 16 thousand canadian dollar for this bike that make in CHINA lol u must be kidding me pinarello.

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