Dutch tire maker Vredestein finally gets in on this ‘new’ gravel biking craze with the Aventura, a fast-rolling 700c tire for less technical terrain. Also their Dutch dandelion tire finally comes out of the prototype stage in limited edition, numbered pairs of Fortezza Flower Power tires. And lastly, we can’t just overlook the titanium J.Guillem Atalaya gravel bike carrying those new Aventura tires…

Vredestein Aventura fast-rolling gravel bike tire

Vredestein Aventura gravel tire, fast-rolling 700c gravel bike tires

You can’t say that Vredestein was early to the gravel trend, being that this is their first gravel tire. But for a late entry into the market, the new Aventura looks like a nice option for riders looking for a fast-rolling, high-volume 700c tire.

The tubeless-ready Aventura shares its supple 120tpi  construction with Vredestein’s top-spec SuperLite casing cross-country tires, and a tread pattern inspired by those XC-race Black Panthers & Spotted Cats. The tread pattern is made of increasingly larger trefoil knobs that get taller and more widely spaced as you move out from the center, for a good balance of cornering & braking grip with a smooth transition as you lean into loose turns.

Vredestein Aventura gravel tire, fast-rolling 700c gravel bike tires

That tread design uses a triple compound rubber – softer shoulders, harder but still grippy center tread, and a third supportive rubber under the center that keeps it fast-rolling & puncture-resistant.

The Aventura is available in two widths a 52€ 700x38c (410g) and 58€ 700x44c (450g). Both will come in both all-black and natural tan wall versions. All versions should be available later this year, but where they will sit in the Vredestein line-up isn’t entirely clear since they are not road or MTB.

Fortezza Flower Power sustainable dandelion rubber road tires

Vredestein Fortezza Flower Power tires, limited edition numbered sustainable dandelion rubber road tires

We covered the green version of these Fortezza Flower Power tires back in 2017 when the dandelion rubber technology was first introduced, as a more sustainable, more local alternative to natural rubber harvested from trees on the other side of the globe.

Vredestein Fortezza Flower Power tires, limited edition numbered sustainable dandelion rubber road tires

Now those tires are finally hitting the market in more commercial quantities (we’ve seen the same idea from Conti now too). Vredestein is doing it in a limited edition run of top-spec road race tires, that they say have 2% more grip, and incrementally improved rolling resistance compared to their regular Fortezza race tires.

Vredestein Fortezza Flower Power tires, limited edition numbered sustainable dandelion rubber road tires

250 tires are being offered in this limited edition run. Each is individually numbered, and only available as a pair in November 2019. Limited edition pairs will sell for 150€ in a numbered box set, with the 120tpi tires only available in 700x25c, at 240g per tire.

Vredestein.co.uk

J.Guillem Atalaya titanium gravel bike

J.Guillem Atalaya titanium gravel bikeSo what do we know about that nice ti gravel bike sporting the new Vredestein Aventura gravel tires?

The Atalaya is an affordable Asian-made titanium gravel bike from J.Guillem, like Vredestein also based in The Netherlands. Officially able to run only up to 650×2.1″ or 700x40mm tires, here is has the new 44mm Aventures.

J.Guillem Atalaya titanium gravel bike

The welded 3Al/2.5V titanium gravel frame features a cast BB+chainstay yoke, cast 12mm thru-axle flat mount disc dropouts, and a cast tapered headtube with internal cable routing & Di2 compatibility.

J.Guillem Atalaya titanium gravel bike

The ti Atalaya comes in four stock sizes (52-58cm) and is available as a bare frame-only for 2000€, a frameset with fork & headset for 2433€, or complete builds like this with Ultegra from 4000€. It is available in the US via the folks at Lindarets.

JGuillem.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. check out the tyre clearance on the rear tyre …there isn’t any (nicely made frame but forget having anything above 35mm rear tyre )

    • None of the photos here show a proper angle to size up tire clearance. How did you come to the 35mm conclusion when this bike has 44’s mounted?

      • I bought that frame, returned it due to the poor tyre clearance, (beautifully made though) have pics still showing it with 40mm tyres touching if required to prove… so ended up with a Enigma Escape Ti ..no tyre clearance issues

        • Marc L another Atalaya owner in the comments below seems to love his and says “700×40 is a little conservative” and plans on running the 44’s in this article. Are you running DH rims or what? [shoulder shrug]

        • Marc L another Atalaya owner seems to love his and in the comments below says “700×40″ is a little conservative”, plans on running the 44’s in this article. Are you running DH rims or what? [shoulder shrug]

        • Andrew,
          MY2019 and 2020 Atalayas have room for 700x44mm (as mounted/measured) tires. We ship all Atalayas (in the US) with headless screws in the seat tube fender mount which also buys some space.

          MY18s were a little tighter- I’ve only seen one but 38s are likely the max on those.

          If anyone wants to PM me, I’m happy to send pics.

          Marc from Lindarets

          • i stand corrected the wheels where Prime carbon road wheels (again not wide rims) with wbt nano 700x 40c TCS Lights (tan walled) …just found the pics.. 🙂

  2. I spent a couple of hours on my Atalaya this morning and it was lovely. Of course, I may be a little biased 😉

    The 700×40 is a little conservative: 44mm as-measured juuust passes the 6mm all-around clearance requirement, depending on the tread height. Those Aventuras look like a nice combination of smooth rolling and loose-dirt cornering, excited to give them a go.

  3. Fail to see the point of producing limited numbered runs of a disposable good. Especially ones that espouse more eco friendly but use a kilo of cardboard for packaging. Seems like a self inflicted ethical contradiction.

    • Its not really an eco thing. Rubber produced from standard rubber trees have a large risk to them. The first is rubber blight. Its a fungus that once it turns up in a forest, it will kill all trees. This happened in Brazil and killed nearly all the trees almost overnight. There is no cure for it. There are “doom’s day” scenarios that a global outbreak of this could cause a complete collapse in the rubber industry. The next has to do with how much industry pays for the rubber sap. Its next to nothing so poor farmers have been cutting down their rubber trees for more profitable crops. All this makes for uncertainty in the market so companies are trying to get ahead of the game by trying to derive rubber from different plants.

      For more info, check out the series on Amazon Prime called “This beast we call the global economy”. Its a great series that covers all sorts of topics but one is solely devoted to rubber and how it plays a critical role in the global economy. The host is Kal Penn from Harold and Kumra and is worth a watch.

      • But Collin, it takes six years of growth for a rubber tree to produce harvestable sap. Not only that the standard rubber manufacturing process also relies on petroleum from the Middle east. On the other hand, a dandelion takes about 2-3 weeks to mature and making rubber from it also eliminates the foreign petroleum component. I don’t really know how you can make rubber manufacturing be more eco friendly and sustainable than that! Seems to me there’s a bit more to it than just pointing out uncertainty in the market as a catalyst to find alternatives.

  4. Hi Cory and to all reporters of this lovely “webzine”, could you please specify the country of manufacturing. Asia is a continent, not a country. No issues as to where the frame me is made (China, Taiwan Vietnam Cambodia) but for consistency purposes, let us make it clear.
    Thanks

    • I know that Vredestein used to have a bunch of tires produced at Lion Tires in Thailand. All their tubular tires and some road bike clinchers. So I wouldn’t be surprised if they still do.

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