Standert’s Italian-made Scandium alloy Kreissäge RS road bike is faster than ever, thanks to a new rally sport upgrade. Building on the successful disc brake update of the Kreissage which debuted less than a year and a half ago, the new RS gets a wider & more integrated modern road overhaul, without any increase in pricing.

Standert Kreissage RS lightweight Scandium road race bike

The Kreissage, named after a circular saw for how it slices through both packs of road racers and all manner of roads themselves, gets another modern road update. Using the same lightweight & stiff premium Scandium alloy tubeset, the Kreissage RS is still designed in Berlin and manufactured in a workshop in northern Italy.

It carries over the exact same race-ready geometry as before, including Standert’s own Project Compact sizes delivering uncompromised fit & handling for even smaller riders. Even with added tire clearance in the updated RS, chainstays remain compact for rocket-like acceleration.

What’s new in the Kreissage RS?

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

Bigger tires for even road racing is a huge trend – offering more comfort over rough roads, but also improved grip, control & lower rolling resistance from running lower tire pressures. The new RS adds just a couple extra millimeters of space, but enough to bring it up to 700c x 30mm tire clearance with a little room to spare.

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

The other big road trend is more integration. The older Kreissage already routed brakes & electronic wiring inside, but featured external mechanical shift cable stops. Now with more wired & wireless electronic build options available, the new Kreissage RS updates internal routing with modular cable port, and adds a new setup that lets buyers bolt-on removable external stops for mechanical drivetrains.

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

The improved internal routing is in part thanks to an updated custom, internally-machined T47 bottom bracket shell that makes room for the wiring and helps get the stays wider to fit 30mm tires.

Kreissage RS pricing & availability

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

The new Kreissage RS is available now from Standert for in six complete bike builds, and four frameset paint jobs in seven sizes. But even though they’ve just launched the RS update, a number of sizes and paint jobs are already out of stock. Standert says they were surprised by the quick response, but happily, and have already put their Italian frame builders on notice to start crafting the next batch to replenish stocks (expect those out to be back in September, after Italian summer holidays).

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

The 1,360g (56cm) Kreissage RS frameset with a tapered full carbon fork, Acros headset & BB of your choice still retails for 1300€.

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy

Complete bikes start at 3000€ with a SRAM Rival 22 mechanical groupset, then climb to 5250€ with Dura-Ace Di2 or SRAM Red eTap AXS, before you start adding-on more extras like premium carbon wheels, power meters & such.

Standert Kreissage RS road bike, Kreissäge RS modern lightweight disc brake Scandium road race bike, made in Italy
all photos c. Standert

Standert.de

6 COMMENTS

  1. At least in the US, Scandium fell out of fashion, with a reputation of having a short life span. Perhaps because it was too brittle. I’m not that knowledgeable on the topic, tho.

    • It was because scandium was knocked off by a few dubious suppliers and the material got an ill deserved bad reputation. Scandium is still used in a lot of aluminum frames but just not advertised.

  2. Mud is right…I had an Iron Horse 2003 Victory with Scandium tubing…it got a crack at the bottom of the seat tube. It was a nice bike, very responsive, but it didn’t last a long time. I guess, it can be the same story with carbon bikes nowadays.

      • Manufacturing of what has come a long way? We are talking welded aluminum tubing. Manufacturers use this material to meet lower price points. So maybe some small process improvements, but I would still plan on it cracking.

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