Standert has given their stainless steel Erdgeschoss a fresh update, completing the evolution of a bike born for cyclocross… into what is now a full-fledged adventure-ready gravel bike. The new Erdgeschoss boosts its adventure readiness with lots of new hauling capacity, plus gets an all new bikepacking-ready carbon fork…

Standert Erdgeschoss stainless steel adventure gravel bike

First of all, I want to commend Standert on their marketing word play. This is a small German bike company that is delivering a modern gravel bike built from stainless steel… “All the trust, and none of the rust“. Or how about this one… “Explore more. Pack more. Worry less. Stain-less!

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, camp
c. Standert, ride photos by Savannah van der Niet

About a year and a half ago the Erdgeschoss got its latest makeover into worry-free 380 stainless steel and the versatile gravel geometry that carries over now. So the 2020/2021 updates are mostly about making it easier to carry more on your next adventure ride.

Gravel & Bikepacking – Tech details

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, angle frameset

The “designed in Berlin, handmade in Taiwan” stainless Erdgeschoss frame adds several more mounting points in this latest iteration. Inside the front triangle you now get 3-pack bottle bosses so you can shift the positioning of cages to work with various frame bag setups, or opt for alt cages to carry more. And the frame adds bosses on the toptube and under the downtube for more cages.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, new fork

Replacing the old Columbus Futura fork is a new sleeker Standert-branded full carbon fork that includes 3-pack anything cage mounts on each leg, full fender compatibility, and cleaner cable routing.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, angled frameMost of the tech features of the frame remain the same, with ovalized toptube, oversized downtube, S-bend seatstays, and tapered chainstays.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, frame details

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, rear end detail

The frame gets a straight headtube for the included Chris King Inset 1.5″ tapered headset, modular internal cable routing compatible with 1x, 2x, mechanical or Di2/eTap/EPS electronic groupsets thanks to plenty of room around a T47 bottom bracket shell, and a standard 27.2mm seatpost.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, dropout detail

The frameset uses flat mount disc brakes and 12mm thru-axles, and there is room for max 700c x 40mm or 650b x 47mm tires.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, headbadge & cats

The Erdgeschoss even still keeps it classic with a real headbadge, and doesn’t forget its roots with Standert’s axe-wielding cat keeping an eye on mud levels at the back of the seattube. Two subdued paint schemes are offered, to highlight the stainless steel construction – Moss Def glittery green or Rawkim blue & yellow, then covered all over with a glossy clearcoat for maximum shine and protection.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, frame detail

The new stainless steel Erdgeschoss claims a frame weight of 1980g (56cm), plus another 450g for the new full carbon fork.

Gravel Geometry, plus Project Compact

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, riding

The Standert Erdgeschoss comes in seven stock sizes from 48-60cm, with still quick gravel-ready handling to balance on-road speed with off-road control.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, geometry

The three smallest sizes feature Standert’s own Project Compact take on scaling the same ride uncompromised quality into tighter bike geometry, by sitting smaller riders more forward into the frame’s reach.

Standert Erdgeschoss – Options, pricing & availability

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, frameset
Standert Erdgeschoss Moss Def frameset

The Erdgeschoss is sold either in essentially two customizable complete builds, or as an 1800€ frameset including the steel frame, carbon fork, Chris King headset & Standert-branded bottom bracket to fit your cranks.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, Force 1x complete
Standert Erdgeschoss Force 1x

The complete gravel bike builds start at 3750€ with SRAM Force 1×11 mechanical & a quality alloy DT Swiss 650b gravel wheelset.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, complete AXS
Standert Erdgeschoss Force AXS

Or for 1000€ more you can upgrade to SRAM Force AXS Wide 2×12, or add a 500€ Quarq AXS power meter crankset, too. For now it looks like the carbon DT Swiss GRC wheelset option is out of stock. Interestingly, all of the complete builds come with the new ti-railed, gravel-specific Fizik Terra Argo saddle we just featured yesterday.

Standert Erdgeschoss steel gravel bike, stainless steel adventure bikepacking gravel road bike, photo by Savannah van der Niet, ready-to-goCheck in with Standert directly for availability of your size, color & build choice with global shipping available.

Standert.de

11 COMMENTS

  1. I still find it the coolest-named gravel bike ever, but that alone isn’t gonna convince me to buy a steel frame bike, even if stainless, for the price of a Ti.

    • Titanium frame makers now rarely publish their frames’ weights. The reason is that they are now typically heavier than aluminum frames and in the range of steel ones. For example, Lynskey’s (admittedly significantly cheaper) ti frames are only around 200g lighter than Standert’s stainless steel one. That might sound like a big difference, but take into account that this bike is designed to be ridden loaded and it becomes less important.

      • Fair enough, but as you said: even if it’s just insignificantly lighter (my daily go-to hardtail weighs around 16 kg, that’s how much I care about a few grams ;)), it’s significantly cheaper, too. At the Standert’s price point you could get a Litespeed or Chiru, and I really can’t see a reason why I wouldn’t.

        • Standert frameset is 2150 USD including fork, bb and ck headset.
          Litespeed Watia frameset with same is 2965.
          Lynsky GR300 frameset with a CC 110 is 2495.

          Value is debatable but this Standert isn’t the same price point as name brand Ti.

        • Hi Matthias, this is Max, founder of Standert Bicycles. Thank you for the name appreciation 🙂
          Usually I wouldn’t do this, but I just wanted to comment on your last statement of a Litespeed being available for the price of the Erdgeschoss, as I felt it was just a bit unfair, seeing how the price of 1.799€ for the Erdgeschoss includes fork, Chris King headset, T47 bottom bracket, through axles and seat post clamp, as well as all the mounts on the frame. If I click together a comparable configuration on the Litespeed Gravel frame, I end up at around 3.700 USD. Of course that doesn’t say anything about other factors, like preferred material for a frame, but we actually take some pride in offering pretty good value for money, so just wanted to leave this here.
          Anyway, thanks for taking the time to look at our bikes and hope you’re enjoying golden autumn riding as we do currently in Berlin!

    • I sold my Ti road bike (2nd of 2 custom builds) a while after I got a 953 frame. I know there’s more to a frame than materials alone and I understand tube spec and how it affects ride feel – still, good steel can ride as well as or perhaps better than Ti imho/ime. It may weigh 500g more but I don’t care about that. I don’t feel the 500g, I feel the balance of spring and stiffness. And yeah I like the slimmer tubes. The aesthetics are part of it. If the ride feel was the same the slimmer look would clinch it for me.

  2. That’s a great looking bike. Lots of nice details. Throw on some fenders and this would make a great 3 season bike for the wet climate and nasty roads where I’m from. I’m curious, what is the port at the bottom rear of the seat tube for? Wiring for electric front derailleurs?

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