3D-printed Pinarello Bolide F HR 3D scandium alloy track bike already set the Hour Record

Filippo Ganna is set to attempt the Hour Record this week on a “World’s First” fully-3D-printed Pinarello Bolide F HR 3D track bike. Made of an aerospace Scalmalloy scandium alloy, the 3D-printed metal track bike is ribbed for aerodynamics in the latest instance of humpback whale biomimicry…

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed track bike

Calling this new Bolide F 3D track bike the “First & Fastest High Performance 3D printed bike ever built”, Pinarello worked with INEOS Grenadier and 2x World TT Champion Filippo Ganna to develop the most refined aerodynamic platform for his Hour Record attempt this week.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, aerodynamic simulation

all c. Pinarello

Pinarello describe the demands of creating Ganna’s Hour Record project bike as “higher than usual. The Bolide F HR 3D
needed a totally perfect fit, designed around the rider, conforming to Filippo’s unique anatomy to maximise both his comfort and overall aero performance. Comfort is often underrated, but when it comes to an UCI Hour Record timed by Tissot attempt it is absolutely crucial because it allows the athlete to go faster for longer. The importance of stiffness is also often underestimated for track bikes, but any flex under power causes the wheels to scrub, losing the athlete crucial centimetres every time they push the pedals.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, Top Ganna cockpit

The result is said to be a more refined blend of aerodynamics, strength & stiffness – fully customizable to Filippo Ganna, but also to consumer athletes as well!

3D-printing – Tech details

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, complete bike

Pinarello’s new Bolide F HR 3D track bike is certainly unique in that it takes 3D-printing technology to new extents, but it’s not quite the first track bike we’ve seen that 3D-printed scandium. TRed’s Peregrine Falcon prototype took that ‘first’ last year in a similar bid to mix aerodynamics, track-ready stiffness, and limitless customization potential.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, additive manufacturing

3D-printing did give Pinarello designers an unprecedented level of design control and customization potential relative to either modern carbon bike manufacturing or more conventional metal bike building. They could create a seamless aerodynamic exterior skin, while at the same time incorporating infinitely customizable internal structural reinforcements to boost stiffness exactly where the bike needed it.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, epoxy bonded

Developed with Metron A.E. in the UK, the Pinarello Bolide F 3D’s tubes are 3D-printed from a high-strength Scandium-
Aluminium-Magnesium alloy called Scalmalloy that was developed in the aerospace industry, specifically for additive manufacturing. Created on a large-format printer, the bike frame still had to be printed in 5 individual parts, that were then bonded together with epxoy after some post-printing clean-up.

Interestingly, elements of the fork’s steerer and handlebar extensions are actually 3D-printed from titanium to handle higher stresses than the Scalmalloy could manage.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, bar testing

To make sure Filippo Ganna’s custom bike was strong enough & safe enough, Pinarello made an exact duplicate of it to be independently tested by EFBE in Germany. The Bolide F 3D frame, fork & seatpost passed the full range of fatigue, impact, and torsion tests as specified by ISO4210 – a first for a custom UCI Hour Record attempt bike.

Humpback Whale biomimicry aerodynamics

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, whale biomicry

One of the standout features of the Bolide F HR 3D is its AirStream tech ribbed seattube tubercles… or AeroNodes.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, humpback biomimicry

Developed based on University of Adelaide humpback whale motion research, the ribbed Pinarello seattube claims to help keep air attached to the bike as it flows past the turbulent area between the rider’s legs going up & down and the forward spinning rear wheel.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, aero drag breakdown

Pinarello says “almost 40% of the total drag of the frame and fork” comes from this combined drag of the seattube and seatpost.

Narrow is faster

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, low frontal area

Other key tech changes, now the old UCI 3:1 rule is gone, come down to reducing frontal area. This new bike uses a narrower 54mm bottom bracket (down from the 68mm standard), and extra-narrow 69mm front hub spacing (down from 100mm) & 89mm rear wheel spacing) down from 120mm track standard.)

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, Italian TT Champ Ganna

Plus, 3D-printing allowed Pinarello to get back closer to the deeper 6:1 to 8:1 aerodynamic sweet spot ratios for airfoil profiles on this  Bolide F 3D track bike.

While Hope went ultra-wide on their ultimate HB.T x Lotus track bike with its 3D-printed lugs joined by carbon tubes, as did Factor who 3D-printed ti for their Hanzo TT prototype hour record bike too, others like Argon 18 went ultra-narrow with a 40mm fork on their Electron Pro track bikes. Pinarello says the data on reduced drag of wide vs. narrow stays isn’t so cut-and-dry once you factor in the rider, so they stuck with narrow which yielded more stable aero improvements overall.

Less aero bar = more aero rider

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, custom 3d-printed titanium cockpit

Just like the seattube & stays that have to be faster WITH the rider, Pinarello developed a new unconventional handlebar that on its own actually increased drag, but together with Filippo Ganna, reduced overall drag. The 3-piece base bar and curvy bolt-on extensions were 3D-printed 6Al-4V titanium.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D – CFD custom, 3D-printed availability

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, currect Hour Record holder Dan Bigham

photo by

This new 3D-printed Pinarello Bolide F HR 3D has already proven itself to be faster with INEOS performance engineer Dan Bigham riding it to the current 55.548km UCI World Hour Record back in August on the unlabeled bike he helped develop – and with a next-gen Muc-Off Ludicours AF chain.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, prototype carbon crankset

Interestingly, the INEOS bikes also have a prototype crankset that Bigham is working on, too.

This week it will be Filippo Ganna’s chance to one-up his team engineer on October 8th.

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, NDS

But equally as cool… Pinarello confirmed that now, the “Bolide F HR 3D is available for ordering at a Pinarello’s official retailer starting from today, and due to the 3D printing production technique, it will be built only on demand.” So all the amatuer Hour Record hopefuls out there with an infinite budget can now get the latest track bike tech, too!

Pinarello Bolide F 3D-printed Scalmalloy alloy Hour Record track bike, angled

This is such a unique project; we believe it’s the beginning of a new manufacturing era. The next step will be to make it more affordable by finding ways to scan riders with more affordable equipment and automatically design each unique bike. From a world champion, to every World Tour rider, and eventually to each and every cyclist out there,” according to Pinarello’s Chief Marketing Officer, Federico Sbrissa.

One Hour, with Filippo Ganna

Watch Pinarello’s documentary One Hour about Filippo Ganna’s hour record. “This is the complete story behind the creation of his unique bike and the preparation around his attempt.

Pinarello.com

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Ernest Fitzgerald
Ernest Fitzgerald
1 month ago

The wavy and/or “backwards” forks have always been a gimmick and will always be a gimmick.

Kjoro
Kjoro
1 month ago

how much FEA have you done on this bike?

Brent
Brent
1 month ago

Based on? So they go full blast to design something new, purely based on performance and you see a gimmick? This fork is completely new, they could have done any shape that deliver results.

JBikes
JBikes
1 month ago
Reply to  Brent

Could be a bit of both. A some point I am sure someone asked if the Pinarello “onda” signature form would harm the aero since the whole effort is to sell Pinarello bikes.

Mark
Mark
1 month ago

Clearly a design cue (“Hey, that’s a Pinarello”). At least they moved away from the hideous “wavy” forks and seat stays circa 2010.

JBikes
JBikes
1 month ago

Why 3D alloy printing and not carbon? Cheaper to do?
I’m interested in seeing all the internally ribbing details. Seems like a huge benefit to additive mfg

preaching pedals
preaching pedals
1 month ago
Reply to  JBikes

I can’t tell which question you’re asking so I’m going to answer it from two directions. Why 3D print in aluminum and not in carbon? You can’t currently 3D print carbon fiber to have the same advantages as molded carbon fiber, so you get a better/stronger/stiffer/lighter material printing in aluminum than in carbon. Why 3D print in aluminum instead of molding from carbon? Could be cheaper when you factor in the cost of molds made specifically for the size and shape of Ganna. 3D printing allows you to create shapes and structures that might not be possible with molds. 3D printing allows for real life design iterations while molds are pretty set in stone (steel). 3D printing is cool and makes for a cool headline and gets publicity. So really there are lots of reasons.

JBikes
JBikes
1 month ago

Ha yeah…it was 3D alloy vs molded carbon. I didn’t see any shape that would be difficult in carbon, but the price may be hard for a one-off. Again, I have no details on the internal structures.

Simon -CZ
Simon -CZ
1 month ago

Hi, are there any frame parameters available? weight? stiffness comparison? approximate price? possible finish? aerodynamic coatings or similar? Otherwise quite an interesting solution, the possibility of reinforcement from the inside of the frame. but I would be interested in the material parameters after 3D printing (welding).  thanks

Larry Falk
Larry Falk
1 month ago

This is all extremely impressive, but is the Hour Record again becoming too much of a tech race? Too much $$$ needed to compete? I agree that additive manufacturing is going to become a part of the bicycle industry, but only the very rich are going to afford it (at least for now) and thus the Hour Record is not going to be as mano-vs-mano as I think it should be.

GFK
GFK
1 month ago

Crankset is interesting. Not unlike Campagnolo Bora / Bullet TT crankset to look at, smoother reverse surface though & single ring of course ….

Ves
Ves
1 month ago

As long as there still idiotic UCI rule “seat front must be 50mm behind vertical mine from BB center” there will be no real improvement of rider’s efficiency.
Beating around the bush, again

Jose
Jose
1 month ago

Put a fairing on the bike and it’s gonna go way faster. The UCI makes these aerodynamic arbitrary contortions into a meaningless exercise. And also having to wear a gimp-like skin suit.

Jeremy
Jeremy
1 month ago

Until UCI actually encourages innovation in frame design we’ll continue to see “novel” breakthroughs.

Dominic
Dominic
1 month ago

Well, it worked, or at least Ganna did it whether or not the bike was the deciding factor or not, his margin in the hour today was huge!

Ivanna Foeckre
Ivanna Foeckre
1 month ago

Could’ve give Ganna a used Specialized Sequoia and he’d have easily crushed the record the man is insanely strong.