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CeramicSpeed continues pursuit of drivetrain efficiency with new Lubrication Development Lab

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Photos c. CeramicSpeed

In addition to making insanely expensive derailleur pulleys, CeramicSpeed is known for going to great lengths to maximize drivetrain efficiency. Whether that’s ceramic bearings in your pulleys, or UltraFast Chain optimization, CeramicSpeed is into it. After starting out by acquiring Friction Fact’s UltraFast chain optimization, recently it was announced that CeramicSpeed had acquired Friction Facts entirely. That includes the founder and former owner of the Boulder, CO based drivetrain efficiency test lab, Jason Smith.

Now that Jason is part of the CermicSpeed family, the company has wasted no time in setting up an all new Lubrication Development Lab which promises to break new ground in the science of drivetrain lubrication…

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With Jason Smith appointed the new Chief Technology Officer, Smith will be the manager of the new lab which will work directly with the CeramicSpeed R&D Lab in Holstebro, Denmark. Smith will be working directly with Dr. Lina Soebjerg in the Danish lab to confirm findings of the Lubrication Development Lab in the U.S. CeramicSpeed says the goal is to continue their pursuit of the most efficient drivetrain possible with new lubricants that offer the lowest friction and longest lifespan. The lab will also be used to investigate claims of current lubricants using their new facility which they consider the most sophisticated in the industry.

It will be interesting to see where it goes from here.

ceramicspeed.com

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Woody
Woody
6 years ago

Dressed photo much?! What an array of presumably inferior tested competitor products

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
6 years ago

Derp. Blue liquids and fancy glassware mean it’s science time!

dockboy
dockboy
6 years ago
Reply to  Tyler Durden

That blue might be Rock N Roll.

matt
matt
6 years ago

Nothing against CeramicSpeed, but I feel like the success of companies like this encourages an industry that keeps selling ridiculous high-tier, race-oriented products to a public that isn’t asking for them. Just my guess as to why the industry is floundering.

Eleven_g
6 years ago
Reply to  matt

You are right but where we are this ‘stuff’ (expletive avoided) is lapped up by the corporate warrior, determined to prove he is that bit faster on his that bit more expensive bike. The weekend roads are full of them…

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
6 years ago
Reply to  matt

More specifically it’s the road bike sector of the industry got absolutely pummeled this year. Too many dopers in the sport, and if you predominantly ride a road bike (which I have for 30 years) it’s getting far too dangerous out there (US roads). The only people really buying these silly trinkets are1%’ers and trust fund hippies from Boulder.

lop
lop
6 years ago

You guys basically summed up the problem in the industry right there.

Lemond Rider
Lemond Rider
6 years ago

No need to stifle innovation otherwise we would all be riding steel frames with down tube shifters. Oh wait…..that might not be so bad.

shafty
shafty
6 years ago

How about instead of looking for that last 0.0001%, they quantify the properties of existing lubricants, make those findings known, and then sell a lubricant with acceptable, and published properties.

Greg
Greg
6 years ago
Reply to  shafty

isn’t that basically what Friction Facts did?

Luke
Luke
6 years ago

The moment they started selling ceramic headset bearings is the moment I lost all respect for this company. I think the research into lube may be worthwhile, but come on guys. Ceramic headset bearings??

Just saying
Just saying
6 years ago
Reply to  Luke

Do you think the cane creek 110 is a nice head set?

Darryl Duck
6 years ago
Reply to  Luke

The biggest killer of headsets is rust, perfect application for ceramic.

haromania
haromania
6 years ago

Seems like this company has done quite well for themselves, bravo.

SNIPE-HUNTER
6 years ago
Reply to  haromania

Oh boy; they sell other people’s ideas, packed into overpriced replaceable widgets… they’re kind of like the bad drug dealer, where MOST people will only buy their pills once… one time buyers(because $300 steel rusts). Now that they’ve purchased the hard work of Friction Facts, they’re on the path of ‘phony baloney’ to bring you the best chain lube evvva!! It doesn’t matter that highly specialized companies, chemists(with them fancy degrees and what not), and privateers have been doing this for decades; trying to find the magic bullet.

satisFACTORYrider
satisFACTORYrider
6 years ago

fast frictionless ceramic snake oil speed

AngryBikeWrench
6 years ago

Here’s what I want to see – rigorous testing that does its best to replicate real-world conditions. I think Wipperman did some of this in the past. I want to know what happens to a chain when it’s being doused with water and grit and while being ridden for 20 miles. Or 60. I want to know what cleaning method really makes a difference to chain longevity. I want to know which lube actually extends the life of a chain. I don’t give a crap what will give me that extra 0.001% efficiency gain – I want to know what really works to make my drivetrain work better for more miles in less-than-ideal conditions.

Dylan
Dylan
6 years ago

Or you could just enjoy your ride, safe in the knowledge that if you can’t tell the difference yourself, then the difference doesn’t matter (assuming you’re not a pro – if you earn your living on the bike then sure, go for the ‘marginal gains’)

Mike D
6 years ago

I agree AngryBikeWrench, but… how do you make a buck off of that? I’m not meaning to be cynical, but seriously–they do all this testing, all this qualifying and quantifying research of lubricants, at obvious cost to themselves…for what benefit to themselves? How do they even begin to recoup cost for designing and carrying out such precise and rigorous testing? The only thing I can see is that they conduct such research for their own benefit, to help in the pursuit of progressing their own product line. And then sell it to whomever will buy into the ‘science’.

But I’ll agree with Dylan here too–if you’re having fun, who cares about the other stuff. Chains are under $20 and last for hundreds if not 1k+ miles. Good enough for me!

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