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Curve Cycling Crowdfunds the Titanosaur, a Monster 36″ Wheeled Gravel Rig

Curve Cycling Titanosaur 36 inch gravel bike3
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Melbourne, Australia’s Curve Cycling just launched a crowdfunding project for their new 36″ wheeled gravel bike, the Titanosaur. Far from the first company to build a bike with 36″ wheels, Curve has a unique approach in creating a titanium gravel bike with the monster wheels.

They are just looking for 20 people to commit to the project and it’s a go. The funds paid will serve as the deposit for your very own Titanosaur. If the crowdfunding project is successful, the final payment will be due upon delivery in 9-12 months.

Curve’s Jesse Carlsson Tells Us Why

Curve Cycling Titanosaur 36 inch gravel bike3
(Photos/Curve Cycling)

“Why are we crowdfunding this? Time and time again we’ve asked ourselves, should we hit go? Should we launch the Titanosaur into the wild? It’s a risky and costly move. We have no idea whether any of you out there in the real world are truly interested in buying a Titanosaur – it’s a super niche product within a niche within a niche. We need your help.

Getting financial commitments from 20 riders will confirm there is sufficient interest to push forward with this awesome project and bring stunning titanium bikes to the tall people of the world. The early financial commitments will fund the costly final stages of development which includes producing a custom fork mold as well as lab testing the final rounds of prototype forks and frames.

If we don’t secure commitments from 20 people by the FPOI (fist pump of interest) date, we will refund the money to those who made commitments, cancel the project, and quietly sob to ourselves for a few weeks or years.

The final product will look a little different – the frame silhouette will not change materially but the fork will be carbon, not titanium as pictured here. The artwork on the final frame, wheels, and fork will align with Curve’s branding at the time of delivery. You’re going to have to trust us on this, but the final product will look sharp. We will keep you updated along the way as we tick off the key project milestones.”

Read more here.

The Details

Curve Cycling Titanosaur 36 inch gravel bike3

Commitment Required: AUD 5000 ($3255 USD) initial deposit, the balance based on the build selected is due on Delivery

FPOI Date: March 21, 2024 (funds to be received by this date)

Number of Commitments Needed to Proceed: 20

Latest Delivery Date: March 21, 2025

Full Price: Force AXS build AUD 13,999 ($9113 USD) (AUD price includes 10% Australian GST) or the Rival AXS build for AUD 12,999 ($8462 USD). All prices include global delivery.

**Note that all images in this post show prototype Titanasaurs in size Large. There are some prototype components as well, the bikes shown are NOT the final product.**

Some Notable Titanosaur Features

Curve Cycling Titanosaur
  • Titanium frame with 3D printed elements to improve strength
  • The frame will be built around the Universal Derailleur Hanger (UDH) standard allowing the use of SRAM Transmission derailleurs
  • Boost spacing
  • New Curve Ride 500 carbon fork with VGM mounts, capable of supporting 7 kg of load on each fork leg. Flat mount with 200mm rotors
  • SRAM AXS 1 x 12 groupset. Two options: Force / X0 Eagle or Rival / GX Eagle. These “mullet” groupsets mix drop-bar shifting and levers with an MTB crankset, rear derailleur, and cassette
  • Brake upgrade to four-piston flat-mount calipers
  • Carbon rims – Curve Coop Hoops
  • 60 cm Aluminium Walmer Bar
  • Vee Rubber 36 x 2.25” T-Monster tires set up tubeless
  • SRAM / Zipp finishing kit
  • Approved for gravel riding with a total system weight of 150kg
  • Curve’s standard warranty for titanium frames, carbon forks and rims
  • The final build specification is subject to change if availability and testing make it necessary

Geometry

The Titanosaur works best for riders 6′ tall and taller, but with sizes M to 4XL available, the Titanosaur can accommodate riders that range from 5’7″ to 7’3″ tall.

Curve Cycles Titanosaur Geometry Chart

So while the Titanosaur will be ideal for really, really tall riders, shorter riders can still get in on the action – as long as you’re an extrovert. According to Curve, riding a Titanosaur is akin to walking a puppy on the beach – “It’s a great way to meet people and will work faster than any dating app.”

Get in touch with Curve Cycling below if you’re interested!

curvecycling.com

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36 Comments
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SomeGuy
SomeGuy
1 month ago

A 1400mm wheelbase … so it’ll steer like a dumptruck. But at least the available sizing eliminates around half of adults worldwide.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

Yup, I’d totally be interested just to have one extra weird bike in my stable. But the wheelbase is a huge mistake for everything but possibly touring. Nearly ANY bike with wheels this big needs a curved seat tube to shorten those ridiculous chainstays.

Jimmy @ Curve
Jimmy @ Curve
1 month ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

Yep. That’s the conventional thinking when making 36ers for regular-height people. This is not a bike for regular-height people.

Jimmy @ Curve
Jimmy @ Curve
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

It’s a bike for (very) tall people. So yes, we are aware that it’s not a bike for everyone.
We’ve thrown in a size MD in there for “normal” height people who might be interested in something that will stand out.

I’m not a tall person (174cm) and I’ve ridden the size LG prototype on our local singletrack. You’d be surprised to know how well it handles and that it’s not like a dumptruck at all.

SomeGuy
SomeGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  Jimmy @ Curve

I’ll bet it feels very different. Look, I’m sure there are riders who would love this bike. But in the end, it is best suited to someone 185cm+ (6’1″), which represents about 8% of the total world population. Of the people in that Nth percentile who ride bikes, how many are really on board with a custom bike that needs a fork, tires, and rims that barely exist? The long-term maintainability of this thing is highly questionable, no matter how anyone feels about the bike itself. Chain replacement alone would cost *double*.

Curve has built a reputation on making outstanding bikes that last, and I just can’t picture anyone keeping this bike maintained for real riding 10 years out.

Justin
Justin
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

Look at the positives, how many competitors would Curve have?

And this bike is more likely to be going for the long-term than most of the FS E-MTBs on the market today.

(double the chain costs .. c’mon, that’s no big deal is it. If it uses 2 full chains have half the wear rate anyway)

Itsumishi
Itsumishi
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

8% of the population, of which a large percentage (say everyone over 6’4″) that don’t have many good options for gravel/touring bikes.

This is an ultra niche product by Curve’s own admission – but ultra niche products still cater to… well their niche.

Yeah sure
Yeah sure
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

You know you might be onto something? Almost like this product is specifically designed for very tall riders not the vast majority of riders world wide. Wait till you find about company’s that sell tall clothing as well. Would blow your mind.

JNH
JNH
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

About the same length as my CR250, it’ll corner just fine.

Hamjam
Hamjam
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

All bikes now feel terrible after riding my Yuba Mundo cargo bike for a year. The ridiculous length makes it feel like you are flying. In use, the turn radius is about like a regular bike.

nooner
nooner
1 month ago

I would keep an open mind on this, it could be awesome. I was riding and testing 29ers back in the 90’s and proved they were much faster than the 26″ bikes of the time.

SomeGuy
SomeGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  nooner

Larger wheels can absolutely make sense, but it’s important to recognize that there is a point of diminishing return with everything. In the case of wheel size, that point comes in the form of compromises made in order to fit very large wheels under small riders. It took a long time for bicycle designers to find ways to get mountain bikes with 29″ wheels to work for 5’3″ riders. Ultimately, one of the things that made small 29’ers work was losing front derailleurs. 29″ wheels have absolutely been worth it. The extra 2″ in wheel diameter has been life-changing.

Going from 700c gravel to 36″ is not the same thing. The difference in rim diameter is an extra 165mm (6.5 inches!!!). It’s too much. A quick look at the geo’s and the reach numbers alone are waaayy out of hand. A 5’7″ rider on their smallest bike would need a zero-offset stem. That’s absurd. Add in the fact that a minimum height of 5’7″ eliminates about 1/4 of men and over 3/4 of women from the customer base, I don’t see this thing going anywhere.

750d, on the other hand might actually make sense for gravel. That wheel is 38mm larger than 700c – which is the same change in diameter from 27.5 to 29″ – enough to be very beneficial, but still small enough to work for smaller riders, given the right geo design. I actually have a full size run of preliminary 750d geo’s sitting in my BikeCad file right now, just waiting for the word “go” from the powers that be. That could actually happen.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

This looks like a very poorly planned frame. I can’t imagine doing a worse job

Jimmy @ Curve
Jimmy @ Curve
1 month ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

Thanks for your input.
We’ve actually been testing prototypes for several years. We’ve gone a different direction with this 36er for a reason – and our testing has shown that our approach works.

Itsumishi
Itsumishi
1 month ago
Reply to  Jimmy @ Curve

I’d just show them the video of Jesse riding up the stairs:

https://www.instagram.com/jessecarlsson/p/CCqFIYMnHbz/?img_index=2

Dday
Dday
1 month ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

I have to wholely disagree, I think it’s a absolutely beautiful. Downloaded the image to put as my desktop. I want!

TheKaiser
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

It doesn’t have to fit everyone to be a worthwhile niche product for a small group of people who ARE suited to such dimensions. There are already niche brands that cater to tall riders (both using standard wheel sizes, and larger 32″ or 36″), so it doesn’t seem odd to me for a company that has the ability to throw their hat into the ring to give it a shot. They’re clearly not expecting it to be the next big thing.

TheKaiser
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

And regarding the small end of the size range, the fact that the absolute smallest end of their range would be a marginal fit for a 5’7″ rider is no weirder than the fits a 5’1-5’3″ rider riding a mainstream 29″ wheel MTB or gravel bike deals with. If you look at the stem/bar setups of world cup MTB female racers, you’ll see a lot of crazy angled stems, missing headset top caps, and reverse rise bars, and even still they are running far less than a proportionate saddle to bar drop than their taller competitors, indicating their fits are compromised. Even still, they’re riding 29″ wheels because they feel it’s an advantage over a smaller wheel with a superior fit. So why not offer this 36″ option to as small a rider as possible, as long as you are upfront about the fit compromises?

Matt
Matt
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

As Curve themselves say, this is a niche within a niche. I don’t know why someone who is 5’7″ would want one, but I know several people in the 6’7-7’2 range who definitely would.

SomeGuy
SomeGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  Matt

Hey, good on ’em. I wish them luck with tire replacement and wheel repairs.

Itsumishi
Itsumishi
1 month ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

Curve themselves make the wheels…

dorkdisk
dorkdisk
1 month ago

I’ll wait for the 32er

Davo
Davo
1 month ago
Reply to  dorkdisk

Seems like there’s plenty of space between 29” and 36”. Would love to see 32” become a new standard that would have a large enough customer base to offer a decent range of tyres, while still being a big improvement for us taller types.

Henry Krates
Henry Krates
1 month ago

Being of the extra tall variety, I’m very intrigued. But I’d need to test ride one before laying down that kind of $. I won’t be heading to Australia to ride one any time soon.

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
1 month ago

xacd or walty ti will make youone now for a 5th of the price

Itsumishi
Itsumishi
1 month ago
Reply to  blahblahblah

Have fun asking them for 36″ carbon rims.

Dday
Dday
1 month ago

Could you curve the seat tube to shorten the stays / wheelbase a little? Maybe only on sm/me & md frames? I think just a little would really open it up to 5’6”-5’9” riders which seems to be a large portion of the market. I’m 176 cm and I want this thing bad!

Brendan
Brendan
1 month ago
Reply to  Dday

I’m sure it could be done. They could also just offset the seat tube forward so it mates to the down tube well in front of the BB (and angle it back so the saddle is in the same fore-aft position).

A decade ago Specialized made a full suspension Enduro 29er with a front derailleur, non-boost spacing, and 430mm chainstays. Some quick math shows Curve could get the chainstays down to 513mm, maybe shorter.

Jimmy @ Curve
Jimmy @ Curve
1 month ago
Reply to  Brendan

Making the chainstays as short as possible was not in the design brief for this bike. We were not trying to make a “normal” length bike with large wheels. The whole idea was to go a different direction to other brands who’ve made 36ers. After test riding, it was clear to us that we had a pretty cool thing going.

Martin
Martin
1 month ago

I would totally go for this if I had not recently bought a custom Ti road bike and also looking to invest in a bit burlier MTB. Looks nice … from the eyes of a 6’4″ rider seems kinda right. I see a lot of little details that indicate it’s been thought out. For example, look at the connections to the BB shell … seems unique.

Hamjam
Hamjam
1 month ago

I don’t think this is a bike for tall riders (and Curve never says it is). It just won’t fit smaller riders. I think it is a total misconception that super tall rider needs this because it will look more like an average persons bike. A tall person will have a 20in experience on a 20in bike and a 36in experience on this bike. A short person will have a 20in experience on a 20in bike, but will not fit on a 36in bike. However, the tall and short person will never have and equivalent experience even with proportional adjustments.

Now adding 2mm to the chainstay of each size up makes total sense and will provide a totally uniform experience across rider heights. The bike industry told me so 🙂

Itsumishi
Itsumishi
1 month ago
Reply to  Hamjam

Curve are very explicit this is a bike for tall riders. Even in this very comment section.

Richard Klein
Richard Klein
1 month ago

What parts are available from third parties? I guess brakes aren’t an issue in this era of disc brakes, but where can you get new tires, rims, and spokes? Are 36″ tires easier to get on/off the bead than 700C tires? I have so many questions and this bike is probably too big for me to ride.

King County
King County
1 month ago

I’m going to wait for 36+

Gregory Q Tillery
Gregory Q Tillery
1 month ago

I would love to try this and gravel seems like the perfect application. I would expect it to handle just fine with the BB so far below the axle line.

Adrian McKenzie
Adrian McKenzie
25 days ago

Hi. I love the idea of this and am planning on doing the Gulf to Gulf cross Oz ride up the Birdsville track next year – so I’m thinking this would be the perfect bike. I do have a custom built Zinn bike with proportional length cranks (210mm) which has been a total game changer for me. There is no info on crank length that I can see. It’s proportional wheelsize but what about cranks and ground clearance?

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