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e*thirteen TRS wide range cassette bolts into an easier installation

e13 TRS wide range cassette updated with pinch bolt installation
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The e*thirteen 9-46 wide range 11-speed cassette offers 511% range, more than SRAM Eagle 12-speed, and now it’s easier than ever to install. The original design used a lock ring to secure the upper alloy cluster to a SRAM XD Driver Body. That lock ring required a special tool, which is always a pain, so they redesigned it to be a one-piece design. Now, it’s a simple pinch bolt. Just slide it into place, tighten the bolt to secure it to the freehub body, then use a chain whip to secure the lower steel cluster to it.

e13 TRS wide range cassette updated with pinch bolt installation

e13 TRS wide range cassette updated with pinch bolt installation

The benefit to their design is that you can get extremely wide range in a compact package, which also lets you run a smaller chainring for better ground clearance up front. And, assuming your rear derailleur is already compatible with a wide-range cassette, you don’t need to modify it to fit a gargantuan upper cog. Check our review of the system here.

e13 TRS wide range cassette comparison between TRSr and TRS-plus e13 TRS wide range cassette comparison between TRSr and TRS-plus

It’s available in TRS+ for $249 (€259) and TRSr for $349 (€369), the latter coming in lighter thanks to additional machining. The pics above show the differences on both clusters, with TRS+ on the left. Claimed weights are 339g and 303g respectively.

ByTheHive.com

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Drinky Crow
Drinky Crow
4 years ago

“The e*thirteen 9-46 wide range 11-speed cassette offers 511% range”

So what? It’s still only a 46 cog requiring all but the strongest of riders, especially of 29’ers, to run a small chain rings which don’t play particularly well with many suspension systems.

Seraph
Seraph
4 years ago
Reply to  Drinky Crow

That’s sad that you’re complaining about a 4t difference between already massively-oversized cogs. We used to run 1×9 with 11-32 cassettes and it was just fine. And we rode the same trails, only on 40 lb 26″ full suspensions, not 22 lb 29″ XC race rockets.

MTB922
MTB922
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

32t! You young punks and your fancy gear. I had to push a 12-28 7s with 48-38-28 with NO suspension…

Drinky Crow
Drinky Crow
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

“22 lb 29″ XC race rockets” is prolly the only bike it should be on, not sold with your garden variety 29 lb YT for example.

Rocky Balboa
Rocky Balboa
4 years ago
Reply to  Drinky Crow

Look how far we’ve come that you’re complaining that 46t is too small. On a 29×3″ tyre (frickin massive), a 30×46 combination equals 19.82 gear inches.. If you need easier gearing than that I suspect you’re probably not strong enough to be earning the benefits of an optimised suspension system.

Huge cassettes ruined good shifting. Have you even ridden Eagle?

Ol' Shel'
Ol' Shel'
4 years ago
Reply to  Rocky Balboa

It is small, if you wish to consider the 22/36 low gear that we had prior to 1x. Some of us love to ride up steep trail, and we aren’t embarrassed by having a low ratio that lets us ride, instead of push, even if some don’t think our spec looks cool.

WorkOnSunday
WorkOnSunday
4 years ago

I wonder if all the 2018 YT’s are using this new design.

some dude
some dude
4 years ago

would love to have the manufacture show a picture of the chain wrap on the 9 tooth. have installed a few of these on customers bike and all have has issues on sram and shimano rear ders on full suspension bikes. pedal kick back kills these thing along with hangers and also they have poor shifting through out the range.

Johnny
4 years ago
Reply to  some dude

You need to consider the utility of the 9T. Having three of these cassette on 3 different bikes, I can tell you that with a 34T chainring, the 9T doesn’t get called into service very often. It’s like a 26mph gear @ 80rpm… BTW, all shift flawlessly.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
4 years ago

That TRSr will be pretty tempting when it’s time to replace my SRAM 11s cassette. While I love a light weight bike, $3 per gram saved on the TRS+ is pretty extravagant, particularly on a wear item.

jhbiddle
4 years ago

I’ve had one of the 46T TRS cassettes installed for a year or so with an XTR drivetrain, and it’s excellent. 9-46 covers everything I need.

Ricardo
Ricardo
4 years ago

I love my TRSr cassette. A bit slow shifting down to the 9t. I think that’s because I’m running Shimano so the top jockey wheel is that much further away than if I was running SRAM. Still happy with my decision. It’s also great you can replace just the big rings on the cassette. Beauty foresight.

Johnny
4 years ago

There is something to be said about threads compressing the low range gears onto the freehub body as compared to not getting that compression and hoping that the stack is in the same place every time you pull/replace a cassette. While a bit of a pain to use a special tool, it’s going to add consistency. While I’m a fan of these cassettes, I think I’ll hold on to the threaded parts and migrate them forward as I replace cassettes.

Gram Killeen
Gram Killeen
4 years ago

The complaint about a special tool should be remedied by the fact that, unless recently changed, e*thirteen sends that special tool with each cassette. If the Shimano external bottom bracket tool required for to spin that special tool is special to you, then maybe consider dropping by a reputable shop or a reputable buddy’s house for the install and leave your mechanicking to someone more mechanical.

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