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New Specialized Pathfinder gravel tires find the middle of the road

Specialized Pathfinder mid-knob fast rolling tubeless ready gravel road bike tire
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The latest tire in Specialized’s adventure lineup is the Pathfinder, and it’s designed to bridge the gap between their very fast rolling, minimally treaded Sawtooth and the knobbier (for a gravel tire) Tracer. In fact, they say it’s for rides when you’re rolling on road and off in roughly equal parts.

Specialized Pathfinder mid-knob fast rolling tubeless ready gravel road bike tire

A smooth center tread ring provides contiguous rubber for smooth rolling. Diamond shaped darts fill in the transition area, with slightly larger versions spaced a bit more apart on the outer cornering edge. It’s all made of their Gripton compound to provide solid traction in all directions

Specialized Pathfinder mid-knob fast rolling tubeless ready gravel road bike tire

Underneath is their BlackBelt puncture protection layer, followed by three layers of their 120tpi Endurant casing construction so it’ll hold up to roots and rocks without getting sidewall tears. Specialized boasts that this combo has four Dirty Kanza 200 wins.

Specialized Pathfinder gravel road bike tires actual weights
Left to right: 650×47, 700×38 and 700×42.

They’ll be available in three sizes, each in black or tan sidewalls. Options and actual weights are:

  • 650×47 = 559g
  • 700×38 = 481g
  • 700×42 = 543g

Specialized Pathfinder mid-knob fast rolling tubeless ready gravel road bike tire

The Pathfinder is tubeless ready and retails for $45 each. Available now. And remember kids, don’t drink your 2Bliss sealant, mmmkay?

Specialized.com

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Benny Watson
4 years ago

Looks like only the 700x38mm version is available now. Late March for the 700×42 and 650Bx47. I’m looking forward to trying the 700×42. Looks perfect for where I ride.

Jeremy Hutsell
Jeremy Hutsell
4 years ago
Reply to  Benny Watson

42’s are available at my shop. I’ve already sold two pairs, mounted and sent out the door.

Pynchonite
4 years ago

When I first started riding (way before #putagravelonit was a thing), my boss in Iowa told me that to make a gravel tire, you just rode a set of CX tires until the center tread wore down smooth. Thank you, Specialized, for vindicating him.

Alex Nguyen
Alex Nguyen
4 years ago

could you let me know their actual size mounted on wheels?

hleogr
4 years ago
Reply to  Alex Nguyen

Depends on the rim size

Mike B
Mike B
4 years ago
Reply to  Alex Nguyen

I have the 650×47 version mounted to some Blunt SS’s (almost 27mm internal). At first install they measured closer to 45mm, but stretched out over a couple of hours to right around 47-48mm. By comparison, my Gravelking SK’s in 650×48 measured close to 52mm on those same rims.

cycle4now
cycle4now
4 years ago
Reply to  Alex Nguyen

The 38mm measured true to size. 38.3 on a 20 internal rim and 38.5 on a 21 internal rim. Weight was 380 and 375 grams.

Mounted up very easily. Held air overnight with NO sealant. With sealant they held the same air pressure for over a week. Very happy with these tires.

My only wish is that they were a little lighter, closer to the Gravelking SK 38mm (which is actually a 40 on the same rims).

TheSubaruGuru
TheSubaruGuru
3 years ago
Reply to  cycle4now

Spesh says 480g. Do you really mean 375? Thanks

J.R. Bovinet
4 years ago

So, this is a Specialized version of the Donnelly X’Plor USH?

cxramble
4 years ago
Reply to  J.R. Bovinet

Bit different. Look at the pictures side by side…

Dinger
Dinger
4 years ago

The smooth center ridge seems significantly raised from the shoulder tread. While that should result in long wear life, I wonder what that does to the tire’s feel transitioning from straight to turning?

virgil
virgil
4 years ago
Reply to  Dinger

I’ve ridden the tire a lot and it feels a little iffy in those situations, especially on dirt. The sharp edge of the raised portion, combined with the skinny, but tall shoulder tread/knobs means you can feel all those tiny knobs squirm a little under you during cornering. The grip is there, but it’s un-nerving to feel that little bit of movement. For me, it’s more of an 80/20 road/dirt tire. I’ll take a 37mm Riddler, or a Byway instead.

Sworkaround
Sworkaround
4 years ago

Too bad they come in unusable sizes for pre 2012 cross bikes

Patrick
Patrick
4 years ago
Reply to  Sworkaround

Pre 2012 cross bikes only exist in internet comments.

bryce stacker
bryce stacker
4 years ago
Reply to  Patrick

I’ve got a 2015 hand made gravel bike that can only fit maximum of 35s. These won’t work for me unfortunately.

esc8engn
esc8engn
4 years ago

“In fact, they say it’s for rides when you’re rolling on road and off in roughly equal parts.”

I wish we could just adopt existing industry standard language from motorcycle tires, and just call it a 60/40 (street/dirt), or 80/20, or 50/50, etc. Seems pretty straightforward.

Sidenote: I like me gravel tires pretty aggressive. I wish SmallBlock8’s in 700×40 was a thing. or tubeless Knard’s.

AK_Ben
AK_Ben
4 years ago

Looks pretty much like Donnelly/Clement Strada USH.

Jwilli
Jwilli
3 years ago
Reply to  AK_Ben

Exactly, a little more pronounced, but basically the same tread pattern. Now…that’s not to say there is anything wrong with that tread pattern, as I have the Strada on my wife’s bike and they have been great for her 60/40 terrain. I do think the weight is an issue, but with the puncture layer and overall beef in the carcass, it’s just going to weigh more. No free lunches!

Bruce Burkhalter
Bruce Burkhalter
3 years ago

Any concerns that min pressure on the 700c is 50 PSI? Seems a lot higher than most gravel tires (like GravelKings).

Jwilli
Jwilli
3 years ago

Really, 50 psi min? My XTR rims have a 40 psi max spec. ugh.

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