giant bicycles aero road bike helmet launched at tour down under 2015

Spotted on the Giant-Alpecin team is the bike brand’s latest lid, putting them in the midst of the aero helmet game alongside Specialized, Giro and others.

While most pics floating around the Interwebs show just the exterior atop a rider, we managed to find one in the pits and scored some closeup and interior shots, showing the channeling and retention system. The helmet uses three massive front ports to bring air in and four rear ones to let it out. Inside, channels should keep the air flowing smoothly between the two and help keep your noggin cool.

Other than that, it’s one solid, smooth surface for the air to glide over…

giant bicycles aero road bike helmet launched at tour down under 2015

 

The vents are the largest we’ve seen on an aero-specific helmet. Some argue that the front of the helmet creates a high pressure zone that pushes air around the helmet rather than letting much of it into the vents, so perhaps the oversized holes here help mitigate that and improve the cooling effect compared to other, more closed off designs.

giant bicycles aero road bike helmet launched at tour down under 2015

giant bicycles aero road bike helmet launched at tour down under 2015

 

A reasonable amount of padding and fully adjustable retention mech should keep it comfy. Two indents  at the brow should help pull air off the forehead and through the helmet, too. One thing that seems to be missing is a good brow pad to move sweat off to the sides and away from your eyes.

giant bicycles aero road bike helmet launched at tour down under 2015

Thanks to Jayson at GravelCyclist.com for the pics, check him out on Facebook here.

 

16 COMMENTS

  1. “Some argue that the front of the helmet creates a high pressure zone that pushes air around the helmet rather than letting much of it into the vents”.

    Some people are confusing action and reaction. The high pressure zone in front of the helmet – called ‘anterior stagnation point’ – is exactly what is needed to push air into the helmet. This is the best place for ventilation inlets, as demonstrated already in a 1941 NASA report (http://tinyurl.com/njbv3rk). The posterior stagnation in the back is likewise the best place for outlets. The difficult part in designing a good aero road helmet is ensuring enough ventilation when stopped or going slow.

  2. “The difficult part in designing a good aero road helmet is ensuring enough ventilation when stopped or going slow.”

    Actually the difficult part is making an aero helmet that is not ugly as all hell…

  3. This helmet is a bit scary. They’ve reduced the material to nothing in the front which makes it much less effective if you hit that part of your head.

    Also, somebody get Kittel shorts and a helmet that actually fit!

COMMENT HERE: (For best results, log in through Wordpress or your social media account. Anonymous/fake email comments may be unapproved or deleted. ALL first-time commenter's posts are held for moderation. Check our Comment Policy for full details.)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.