“Hello, Wireless? It’s Shifting. You win.”

Spotted at Sea Otter last year in prototype form, the Archer Components D1x wireless shift system showed potential as a simple upgrade thanks to its focus on 1x drivetrains only. In December, they updated us to say they were close to production, and by Sea Otter 2018, they had a fully finished, retail ready package to show off.

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

The system is exceedingly simple – it’s just a remote and the receiver/actuator. By limiting the design to 1x drivetrains, they only need two buttons, one for up shifts and one for downshifts. And yes, it will work on SRAM Eagle and anything else with smaller cassettes. In fact, they not only sell the regular kit as shown above for $389 (minus derailleur), they also sell bundles with SRAM GX Eagle cassette and derailleur ($624), eThirteen DRSr cassette ($699) or DRS+ cassette ($599). All kits include a SRAM chain, too, and end up giving you a discount versus buying everything a la carte.

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

The shifter unit houses a rechargeable Li-Ion battery that’s the same shape and size as a AA battery, so in a pinch you can swap in any standard AA. It needs about 6″ of clear, straight space on the chainstay, or you’ll need to find somewhere else to mount it…like maybe your seat tube. Other than that, they say there’s no limitation to which type of bike you can use it on, and it should work with any drivetrain. Battery life is claimed at 50 hours in low power mode (which still shifts the same, but GMHG and auto shut down are deactivated) or 30 hours in standard mode.

What’s GMHG? It’s the Get Me Home Gear that you select in the app, and if power gets critically low, the system will automatically shift to that gear, then power down.

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

The unit does fill the space inboard of the chainstay, so it’s important to get it installed tightly to avoid accidental contact with the cogs or spokes.

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

The shifter uses a Li-Ion rechargeable AAA-sized battery, so emergency swaps are possible here, too. It’s a simple up or down button combo with a Matchmaker+ mounting compatibility. Three mounting holes let you customize its position.

archer components wireless shifting upgrade kit aftermarket add on to turn any 1x mountain bike into wireless shifters

The remote is paired to the shifter and turns itself off once you turn the shifter off. The entire system is highly water resistant (it’ll survive a quick creek crossing, but not meant to remain submerged) and operates between -10ºC and 50ºC (14ºF to 122ºF).

This installation video shows how to set it up. They’re available now on their website.

ArcherComponents.com

12 COMMENTS

  1. Take a simple system that is water proof, serviceable and simple then make it extremely complicated and unserviceable. Why they haven’t launched one for idiots to use on their brakes I don’t know.

  2. If it looks like a AAA and it swaps for a AAA, it’s probably a AAA. Lithium ion runs at a completely different voltage. Probably just uses NiMH, not that there’s anything wrong with that.

    • They are really 3.6 volt (nominal) lithium ion batteries (10440 and 14500 sizes), so you don’t want to put one of them in anything expecting regular 1.5 volt batteries.

      I forget what they said to assuage my fears about battery mixup.

      I’m not too sure how well the setup will work with normal alkaline or NiMH batteries.

  3. While I don’t see a real functional advantage with this system, one real benefit of the push-button system could be for riders who are – ahem – ‘more experienced’ – and have joint issues in their thumbs, etc… Arthritic hands can be a real beyotch for pushing a thumb shifter – SRAM can be tough for some with the long-travel of the lever. Either Shimano or SRAM, when a bit gunk-filled can be hard to push even for us with still-normal hand function. Sold XTR Di2 years ago to a customer who had some nerve injuries from a bad crash and the push-button system made it so he could ride again. Another, a surgeon who was having problems with his thumbs bought Di2 to extend his career while still allowing him to ride. Something to think about – maybe not for everyone, but this could very well be a great actuation method for someone either injured or aged. I also think the fact that you can carry a AA and AAA battery in your pack for a quick swap in the field was thinking ahead.

  4. A quick search Pulls up XT M8050 di2 shift kit for $674 (granted without a cassette) but still a much better more integrated option for practically the same price with the additional function of being able to pair with a 8050 front derailleur if someone wants too down the line.

    If they could do the whole kit and kaboodle for sub 200 (using your existing derailleur) then maybe…. but seems gimmicky to me basically all the draw backs of mechanical and electronic groups combined with very few advantages. Good idea for tandems though.

  5. I’d like to see a version optimised for drop bar use, to get around the lack of compatibility between drop bar shifters and MTB rear mechs.

  6. Any idea about what bars it’ll work on?
    Road bars are a hair wider than mountain. Would the shifter work on road?
    Why? Because Frankenbikes rule my world for now. That’s why.

    ODT

  7. I have been running this since it came out on early release. The fact that I can run anything with it was appealing. Also I have an old injury that limits my thumb shifting after a couple hours. This is the hot ticket for solving issues, plus anyone can set it up the app is awesome.

What do you think?