Launched as a way to kill the front derailleur once and for all, SRAM Eagle not only made the mountain bike lighter, but also simpler. Which is something beginner riders can appreciate more than anyone. Those same riders are the ones who can really use the most range, too, and now there’s a complete system-engineered Eagle drivetrain for them, too. Coming in as low as $375 for a complete group, it takes away all excuses for not upgrading to a fully modern drivetrain. And the surprising part is, it makes it all work on a standard 11-speed freehub body!

NX Eagle Tech & Design

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The new NX Eagle cranks are an updated version of the prior NX and use a forged 6000-series aluminum with their new DUB spindle. It’s a direct mount chainring design, so you can upgrade to other sizes or options.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The crankset will ship with a 32-tooth steel chainring attached, with Boost offset. It gets all the same Eagle tooth profile shaping for solid chain engagement and easy release at the bottom.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The NX Eagle rear derailleur is functionally the same as the others, meaning it’ll also work with the other Eagle cassettes, shifters, etc. The key difference is materials, with plastic sections on the knuckles, but the performance features like an oversized lower pulley and Avid rollamajig cable management are there. As is the clutch and Cage Lock.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The cage is stamped steel, other body parts are alloy, and hardware is stainless steel.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details 2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The NX Eagle shifter is essentially the same as the others, with similar downgrades in materials. The lower level shifters also lack the thumb lever’s position adjustment feature.

Not shown, the NX Eagle chain shares the bean-shaped quick link and link shaping features, but runs solid pins.

A standard Eagle cassette

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The cassette is the real surprise. By swapping out the other Eagle groups’ 10-tooth cog for a standard 11-tooth one, they can make it fit on a normal splined 10/11 speed freehub body. Meaning, you don’t need an XD driver body to use NX Eagle.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

The cassette uses stamped steel cogs for the first 11 cogs, with an alloy 50-tooth to save a bit of weight. That upper cluster is held together with stainless steel rivets and uses a concave shaping on the backside to bring the larger cogs closer to the spokes…same as with the other Eagle cassettes, which is what makes room for 12 cogs in the space designed for 11.

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed mountain bike component group tech details

Tooth counts are 11-13-15-17-19-22-25-28-32-36-42-50, putting it just shy of the full 500% range of the others, but still has the big climbing gear we all want. In between the other individual cogs are plastic spacers. Interestingly, they say this is the only Eagle cassette that’s rated for e-MTB use, so it’s stronger than the others. And heavier.

SRAM NX Eagle Pricing & Specs

2018 SRAM NX Eagle 12 speed mountain bike group pricing and specs with claimed weights

Individual component pricing is:

  • Cranks ($105-121 / €116-135 / £104-120)
  • Rear Derailleur ($107 / €119 / £106)
  • Cassette ($100 / €110 / £99)
  • Shifter ($42 / €38 / £34)
  • Chain ($26 / €29 / £26)

All prices include VAT. Crankset pricing is for standard spindle lengths as the lower price, and fat bike versions a bit higher. Complete groups will get a $375/€410 / £365 retail price, excluding bottom bracket. Compare that to GX Eagle at $545, XO1 Eagle at $1,157 and XX1 Eagle for $1,356. The group will start shipping in September. Check this post for our first impressions ride review and actual weights!

SRAM.com

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16 COMMENTS

  1. Is this eagle chain compatible with Shimano 1x chainrings? Really hope so because I don’t want to get rid of the super cheap stages I have. If so this will be added to our bikes once we move to a more mountainous area.

    • Just use a KMC X12 chain if you’re worried about this. The KMC chains are excellent; I run KM X11SL-DLC chains on all of my bikes, and prefer them over Shimano or SRAM chains.

      -Ed

  2. Wait; so I can buy a new BB (which I am past due on), correct offset chainring,and upgrade my 6 year old triple chainring bike with current standards?! SOLD!

  3. Am I the only one that can’t keep up with SRAM’s groupset hierarchy? Is eagle 12 spd or is it a level? Are there same level 11 spd and 12 spd units?
    Sounds goofy, but its one of the reason I never look at SRAM for my mtb (and I don’t like the sound of their shift controls…too high frequency of a click…I know sounds ridiculous)

    • I think so on the first point, yeah. Eagle is 12 speed. It’s a descriptor that adds on to the group name indicating its 12speediness.

      It’s actually easier than Shimano (or previous Sram): I’m confused, is XTR 12 speed, 11 speed. 10 speed, 9speed, or 8speed?

      XX1 Eagle is XX1, but 12 speed. Same with XX Eagle, GX Eagle, and now NX Eagle.

      • I can kind of wrap my head around the group naming (I prefer numerical system like Shimano’s – M9000 is intuitively greater than M8000…not sure why XX is greater than XO)

        But there are others faults on SRAM’s nomenclature. For example, an XTR M9000 group runs a M9000 cassette. I know a M8000 cassette isn’t at the level of an M9000 cassette by name only. On an SRAM cassette, what is intuitive about an XG795 cassette being tied to XO1 and an XG1199 cassette being XX1 level? Now I know an XG1199 is probably better than an XG795, but I have no idea if the XG1199 is the best one and matched to the level of XX or there is another above it. There is no reference to the group level (XO or XX) in either of the cassette names. Drives me crazy…

    • My thoughts too, Where does this fall in comparison with GX Eagle? GX Eagle is basically the same price maybe a few bucks more for the rear derailleur individually but the group is pretty much on parity with this. In fact I just found a GX group for 350 bucks new.

      • This is basically Sram MTB tiagra .4th tier of their 12spd stuff . I think you’d notice that 105 and tiagra are pretty close on price, too .

  4. The Sram site states that the cassette is Compatible with 8-, 9- and 10-speed splined driver bodies. So, yes as stated here it would also be compatible with “a normal splined 10/11 speed freehub” using a spacer. I don’t think there are many low end buget 11 speed freehubs yet so this makes sense. Does this mean we’ll one day see 13 cog cassettes for 11 speed freehubs?

    • OK I understand now. I’m thinking of 11 speed road bike freehubs and they’re talking here about 11 speed mountain bike freehubs which are the same length as 10 speed roqad bike hubs.

      • A lot of hub manufactures are supplying the 11 speed road sized cassette bodies on their MTB hubs now, a 1.6mm thick spacer is included. This is great if you want to make a gravel bike or road bike using MTB wheels or hubs as the road 11 speed cassette is slightly wider thanks to Shimano.. And I guess the extra bit of space might mean a 13th gear is possible for MTB (once everyone is on 12 speed of course!)

What do you think?

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