If it’s not aero savings, it’s rolling drag savings that everyone’s after. The new Token Shuriken runs $330, making it one of the more affordable oversized ceramic bearing systems on the market. And it’s not just drag savings they were after. They’re promising equally crisp shifting and performance that’s quiet…like a Ninja.

Token Shuriken oversized ceramic bearing pulley wheel system for Shimano derailleurs

It uses a 12/19-tooth combo, and the lower large wheel has a dual tone titanium PVD coating over the AL7075 alloy. The cage is carbon fiber, held together with AL7075 and hardened steel hardware. Claimed weight is 69.5g.

Token Shuriken oversized ceramic bearing pulley wheel system for Shimano derailleurs

Token Shuriken oversized ceramic bearing pulley wheel system for Shimano derailleurs

They say, at the most, you’ll need to add two chain links, and it works with cassette cogs up to 34 teeth. It fits Shimano Dura-Ace R9100/R9150 and Ultegra R8000/R8050 derailleurs.

Token threadfit bottom bracket for Trek PFBB90 frames reduces creaking and noise on trek pressfit bottom bracket frames

For bottom brackets, they have a limited edition Team Fortuneo Banque team bottom bracket they’re using in their BH bikes. It’s just graphics, same as their other PF bottom brackets. More important is the new Threadfit bottom bracket for Trek PF90.5 (road) and PF95.5 (MTB) frames, which only have the bearings pressed into the frames, similar to a true BB30.

Token threadfit bottom bracket for Trek PFBB90 frames reduces creaking and noise on trek pressfit bottom bracket frames

This solves the problem of creaky, loose bearings by threading each side of the BB shell into each other to create a stiff, one-piece unit once installed.

Token threadfit bottom bracket for Trek PFBB90 frames reduces creaking and noise on trek pressfit bottom bracket frames

It’s available with standard bearings for $51, and a ceramic bearing upgrade is probably coming. The installation tool runs $8-10, but you could order the BB thru your shop and ask them to get it.

Token ProSet headset fits pressfit and integrated headsets with a flat top cap so you can slam that stem

The new ProSet headset is the top part only and lets you slam that stem. The upper cup matches standard Inset headtube diameter, and the bearing’s bevel angle fits into most frames that stick to the Integrated standard. So, it works for both Inset (ZS44) and Integrated (IS42) frames.

Token ProSet headset fits pressfit and integrated headsets with a flat top cap so you can slam that stem

The top cap is ultra thin. For integrated frames, you end up with just 2.8mm of stack height, and about 4mm for inset installs using the cup. Weight is 30.5g (IS42) and 33.4g (ZS44), retail is $45…which is a steal considering you’re also getting a carbon top cap cover and their TBT ceramic bearings and a TiNitride coated bearing race, which they say eliminates the need for extra sealing. They come with a two-year warranty.

TokenProducts.com

7 COMMENTS

  1. Always wanted to see a test between these/ceramic speed and the $70 KCNC oversized jockey wheels/cage. All this is irrelevant to me thanks to my level of racing but it would be funny if they were just as efficient. Every one of these pressfit product releases makes me so happy I went BSA-Threaded with my new frame; $22 bb lasts forever with zero creaking

    • Pressfit in is way better than bsa, lighter and the bearings last much longer. Look at examples from 40-50-60 years ago. The problem with revival press fit is manufacturing “tolerance” (read cheaply made 30 dollars frame sold for 3000). Never heard of a made in Italy colnago creaking.

      • im surprised someone posts this here
        indeed, PF is better than BSA. but it’s cool to hit on PF on the internets and convince the masses to get BSA. Usually its the whole “im a LBS mechanic and i know this” (yea rite..)

        I got a high end BSA and a high end PF and the PF is actually EASIER to service, zero problem, lighter, and the bearings run for years before i need to change them. The BSA on the other hand.. well its ok, but harder to change and i service bearings at least once a year and i dont even ride the bike as much.
        I service all my friends bikes as well, so I much prefer PF – rarely need to touch it and when i do its a 5min job. Threaded always have small alignment issues (oh, i’ll just re-face.. yay) and rarely serviced ones have fused threads.. bleh. Can’t fuse PF. Can’t fuck up the alignment either, its good from day 1 or not.

        sadly, its harder to find PF frames lately, specially for MTBs. Oh well.

        • All I know is that my PF bikes creak, and my BSA bikes (with outboard bearings) have never creaked. I don’t get the PF love. They’re lighter, and you can use lighter cranksets, so I use them, but the system stinks. They’re a PITA. I’m no pro mechanic, just some dude who works on his own bikes. And happens to not like having to hammer on my bike.

        • Agreed, Every one of these stupid arguments centers on the fact that PF is a better interface than a threaded alloy shells bonded into a CF frame. Here is the issue; most mass manufacturers can’t hit tolerance specs necessary to create a positive experience (e.g. quiet and reliable basically you forget about them) for the volumes they produce, with a press fit interface or at least it’s not profitable to produce these frames with QC tight enough to avoid these issues. You ordering a Parlee, Argonaut, or Firefly? Sure PF is probably fine and it’s a very quick system to install/remove but for most mass produced frames you’re either lucky or have to use a very expensive aftermarket replacement. My bb removal/install tool for Shimano is a pain in the ass but I change bb’s every 8-10,000 miles which is about once per year hence its . Not sure what your issue is with re-facing threaded BB’s. I’ve got a ton of BSA bikes all with different prices and qualities of finish/tolerance and have never needed to do this and I’m a home gamer.

        • I have bikes with both BSA and PF. And have worked as a mechanic for a good number of years now.

          My BSA bike are quick and easy to fix, and don’t require much extra care. You can remove and remount the same bottom bracket without having to throw it away. As long as you buy good quality bearings, they last a long time. Sure some BSA frames are out of spec and eat bearings for breakfast, but the same goes for PF. They are still usually faster and easier to replace.

          On my PF bikes it is always a bit more of a hassle to replace the BB, usually once a season. They can be a pain to remove and once removed most of those PF bottom brackets are ripe for the trash. Have to remove the BB because of some internal cable issues? Better buy a new one. The Alu ones are a bit better but even they get destroyed when removing sometimes. And yes I have like 4 different bearing removal tools. Sometimes those suckers are in there tight!

          The newer kind of PF bottom brackets with threads in the middle solve a lot of issues, but it took almost 10 years of crap PF bottom brackets to get here.

          Looks and weight wise i prefer PF, but sometimes the cost is not worth it.

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