We first spotted the FSA ACR integrated stem/headset/steerer system at Eurobike. Now we have more detailed photos of the parts showing how they’re able to create a fully integrated system that hides everything from view. And, most importantly, it’s a design that any frame manufacturer can integrate into their bikes. Already, brands like Bianchi, Titici and others are either prototyping or prepping it for future frames, and we suspect others are likely to come on board. Here’s how it works…

FSA Vision Metron ACR integrated stem steerer and headset combo hides all cables and hoses inside stem fork and frame for better aerodynamics

Using either a one-piece bar/stem or a specifically designed stem, all cables, hoses and wires are first run into the stem. From there, they head into special channels and slots in the headset to get them either into or around the fork’s steerer tube. Likely, the front brake hose would be going into the steerer and the rest would simply fit around it so they could be channelled into the downtube.

how does FSA ACR integrated stem and headset work to hide the cables on a road bike

The beauty of the design is that it still works with a standard tapered steerer with 1-1/8″ upper diameter, but will require a larger upper headset bearing OD. Frames should be able to be made to either use it or not without requiring crazy new standards for those who want to run a traditional system. That said, we’re betting frames designed around this standard will lack external cable ports.

how does FSA ACR integrated stem and headset work to hide the cables on a road bike

Technically offered under FSA’s Vision road bike component line, the ACR system will also use special spacers that provide the channels for the hoses and cables.

how to hide shift and brake cables inside your stem and frame on a road bike

The stem leaves room at the back for cables to turn downward and fit between the gap in the headset’s sleeves. Shown on some of these spacers are slits that let them pull open, so they can be added or removed to get the fit right without having to redo all of your cables. Our hunch is that feature will be on all of them for production versions.

how does FSA ACR integrated stem and headset work to hide the cables on a road bike

Check our Eurobike coverage to see more photos of the system, including the underside of a one-piece ACR-compatible bar/stem unit. And here’s their video:

FSA Vision Metron ACR integrated stem steerer and headset combo hides all cables and hoses inside stem fork and frame for better aerodynamics

The design allows for a wide range of bike fits and still keeps the cockpit ultra clean.

2019 Vision Metron Clincher TL Disc

FSA Vision Metron TL Disc tubeless-ready clincher rear wheel for triathlon and time trials

For triathletes and time trialists that want to go tubeless for better traction and reduced rolling resistance, the new Vision Metron Clincher TL Disc rear wheel gives them the option to do just that. The “disc” in the name refers not just to its design, but also disc brake compatibility.

FSA Vision Metron TL Disc tubeless-ready clincher rear wheel for triathlon and time trials

Like most of their disc brake road wheels, this one is showing model numbers for both 6-bolt (DB) and CenterLock (DB-CL) rotor options. That 1,150g claimed weight is just for the rear wheel, not a pair. Look for this to start shipping in early 2019.

FullSpeedAhead.com and VisionTechUSA.com

22 COMMENTS

      • Damn, this is a hot bike. Exactly what I would like to purchase. Unfortunately, this bike has not mount options on top tube and fork (compared to the new warbird from Slase). And also the geometry is a little bit to small for me (197cm). I’m looking for something similar to the 61cm frame version of Salsa Warbird. Otherwise, I would have ordered that bike immediately. Thanks for the info, this will be the future without any doubt.

        • I am the same height as you and ride a Trek Checkpoint in 61cm, about the same size as the Ribble XL and Salsa’s 2nd from largest size. The largest Salsa is REALLY big, and really only works with a short stem, similar to a modern MTB. I’ve never tried a drop-bar bike with a short stem that I liked.

          The only thing about he Ribble’s geometry that concerns me is the 435mm chain stay. I find stays that long to be stable, but kind of sluggish feeling for most rides I do. The Checkpoint is adjustable from 425-440, I leave it short.

          • Reach would not be an issue 397cm is ok (could be fixed with a longer stem). But a Stack of just 610 is too small for a Gravel Bike. I need something about 640-650cm Stack. Ribble web page also indicates that the largest frame size is only recommended for riders not taller 194cm. Salsa Warbird has 641 Stack and 407 Reach and the Specialized Diverge has 647 Stack and 397 Reach. This kind of Geometry would be fine for me but a Stack of just 610 for a Gravel Bike is too small, unfortunately. Chain stay of 435 is not an issue for me and also needed for mudguards during winter season.

  1. Have fun doing a fitting on a bike with this! LOL. Seriously, I love aero but this is getting a bit crazy, so many scarifies for not even a marginal gain.

  2. This is the kind if setup that can force bike fitting back 20 years. Think of how hard it was to change bars/stems on quilled setups. This caused good enough to be good enough. This leads back to good enough to be good enough.

  3. They better spec some absolutely amazing headset bearings for this to become worthwhile doing.
    £100 labour for a new headset bearing sir!?

  4. My interest in a bike with proprietary stem,bar, or anything else will never progress beyond detached amusement. Also that cable routing is a recipe for suck.

  5. This nonstandard bike part makes bikes hear to fit (deal breaker right there) harder to work on, harder to swap parts. I wouln’t touch it if you paid me to.

COMMENT HERE: (For best results, log in through Wordpress or your social media account. Anonymous/fake email comments may be unapproved or deleted. ALL first-time commenter's posts are held for moderation. Check our Comment Policy for full details.)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.