Spy Shots! New Trek Superfly Alloy Hardtails Get Shaped Tubes, Thru-Axles

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Spotted in the field at the Trans-Sylvania Epic was this new looking Trek Superfly 29er. The frame differs from the current Superfly AL models in several ways, most importantly a thru-axle rear end and more heavily shaped hydroformed tubes. It also gets revised cable routing with internal runs for shifting. Graphics and naming scheme are also different.

No one was really talking, but we managed to overhear something about this being the 2014 version with possible geometry tweaks. Check all the grainy shot-with-a-phone-cam-at-dusk pics after the break…

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Up front we see their E2 tapered headtube with rear shift cable entering the downtube. Brake hose runs externally under the downtube.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

The top tube looks super slim with a flattened shape…

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

…with a nicely formed section where it meets the raised seat tube. The chainstays seemed slightly ovalized, too.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Thru-axle rear end.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Rear brake is now mounted inside the rear triangle instead of outside the chainstay.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

PressFit bottom bracket. Hard to see here, but the rear shift cable pops out just below the top of the left photo, then runs externally to the derailleur. Brake mount is a nicely formed dropout piece.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Reasonably good tire clearance with no chainstay or seatstay bridges.

2014 Trek Superfly 9 alloy 29er hardtail mountain bike spy shots

Similar color scheme to an existing model, but new graphics and a “Superfly 9” naming scheme give it away. More as we get it!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

12 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
bikeboi
bikeboi
9 years ago

shifter cable runs internally for maybe 1/3 of the length? what sense does it make, I mean what were they thinking?

Lonely Island
Lonely Island
9 years ago

[deleted] That looks awesome…

Erik
Erik
9 years ago

They were thinking “it doesn’t matter where we run these cables because the frame will brake in a years time and we will do the original owner a favor by giving them the updated model at a discount”

Lonely Island
Lonely Island
9 years ago

Erik, has that happened to you?

Joe
Joe
9 years ago

@Erik At a discount? Trek have a lifetime warranty on their frames. They’d just replace it. Internal cable routing is predominately about aesthetics. From a buyer’s standpoint, who doesn’t want a good looking bike?

Jon
Jon
9 years ago

I, for one, am not liking those seat stays. Not sure what the outward flair is supposed to accomplish, and I can’t figure a reason why it would be necessary. It doesn’t need to be that wide for caliper clearance. Decent looking scoot if not for that. Trek always seems to throw at least one odd ball detail into every cool thing, making it questionable.

King County
King County
9 years ago

Trek is a little ‘full of it’ when it comes to their frame warranty.

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

I’m really happy with Trek’s warranty. The seat post tube beneath the collar cracked (yes, the bolt was tightened to Trek specs) on my superfly and Trek gave me the latest year’s frame without question.

David French
9 years ago

The cable routing looks a total mess, as does the weld on the non-drive-side chain stay and the whole non-drive-side dropout area. Other than that the bike will probably ride OK and be good value.

Gravity
Gravity
9 years ago

King County – I’ve done literally hundreds of warranties through Trek and had only a small handful of problems. They even replaced a customer’s 1977 Trek with a brand new Madone 5.2, the reasoning being that his particular model Trek was the top of the line at the time, so he deserves a top of the line replacement. It was a frame warranty, so they didn’t include components, but it’s hard to complain.

Anyway, their aluminum frames rarely fail. I don’t think I’ve seen a single modern one break.

tbone
9 years ago

I had a fuel 95 frame crack and it was such a great experience with the warranty that I stuck with Trek regardless. Great warranty, great service and I am a clyde riding a 2012 superfly 100 carbon with 2,187 miles on it and loving it.

Henry
Henry
9 years ago

Snapped a Gary Fisher Presidio steel cross frame after 3 years not only did Trek replace it no questions asked they even upgraded me to a Cronus carbon frame… How is that “at a discount”?????