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TPE15: Pro-Lite lightens up w/ new Antero Carbon XC/Cyclocross wheels, road disc coming

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The new Pro-Lite Antero Carbon mountain bike wheels will come in 27.5 and 29, with the latter working just fine for cyclocross, too.

They use their oversized pawl mechanism to get 84 points of engagement using six 2-step pawls. That’s clicking along next to an oversize Japanese EZO bearing to handle the higher loads caused by modern oversize cogs. The carbon rim has a width of 26mm ext/21mm int and measures 23mm tall. Check the internals and rim profiles, plus more new stuff, below…

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Note the massive diameter of the sealed cartridge bearing just behind the pawls. With two engagement points per pawl, they provide about 4.2º of rotation before engaging.

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A small shelf supports the tire bead for tubeless setup. Wheelset weights come in at about 1,495g (27.5”) and 1,595g (29er).

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The hub uses an 11-speed ready freehub body, which comes in handy since the same internal setup will be used for their upcoming wider, tubeless ready Cicilia road wheels. Those will have an inside width of 19mm, 23.8mm external and be 21mm tall. A Disc brake version of that will follow this month.

Not shown, the new alloy VLR Triathlon frame, which they say is popular in Europe and Australia, gets a slightly slacker headtube than the carbon version to make it a little more accessible for beginners not ready for the super sharp handling of a race-specific carbon triathlon frame. But the rear end is slightly stiffer, so it’s still a performance bike that could tackle an Ironman. $599 for the frame, fork, headset and seatpost. The fork is their Atmos model, which has carbon legs and alloy steerer. Starts as small as a 46, running up to a 60.

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fergus
fergus
9 years ago

Why would a larger cog cause a greater load? I don’t understand, is it not just an adjustment of having gearing at the crank transferred to the rear cog. The forces transferred are the same as the same force is being applied by the rider.

Jeremy
Jeremy
9 years ago

The title references cyclocross wheels, but I don’t see a tubular version.

Robert W
Robert W
9 years ago

Larger cog, greater moment, more torque at a given chain force.

ME
ME
9 years ago

False, the larger cogs will transmit more torque. It is a function of how far the force is from the central axis of rotation. In this case, the torque vector is actually pointing through the axle towards the non-drive side.

scentofreason
scentofreason
9 years ago

If you are going to state ‘and 29, with the latter working just fine for cyclocross, too’, you should also state the allowable maximum psi the rim will support. Lot’s of 29er wheelsets look like they would be great for cross, that is until you find out the max psi the rim can handle is 45psi. Would also be nice to state maximum rider weight limits (us bigger fellas ride too you know…)

Tyler Benedict
Admin
8 years ago

scentofreason – good thought. The only rims that come to mind that’d have a low enough PSI rating to warrant concern for ‘cross racers are Stan’s NoTubes…and I’ve blown a tire off the rim at 42psi before! Sealant, everywhere. In our office. We’ll be sure to mention it if the manufacturer provides a number, but most we’ve seen are tested pretty high because they know many of us are often pumping up to 60psi in there to seat the tire in the first place.

Dylan
Dylan
8 years ago

@ME, the larger cogs will apply more torque for a given chain tension, however in most scenarios involving larger cogs, the chain tension is decreasing because a ‘granny’ ring is being eliminated. I.e. looking at the size of the cog in isolation from the ratio of cog size to chainring size, and making a generalisation about the amount of torque applied at the hub is a nonsense with no practical application.

scentofreason
scentofreason
8 years ago

Tyler, thanks for the response. On my cross bike I’m running American Classic Hurricanes with Vittoria Zaffiro Pro IIIs. I’m running 90psi. So when I say I’m interested in rims that tolerate a high psi, I’m talking road tire pressure. (I’m 225lbs, so running 90psi for me is about as soft as it will ever get on a skinny tire). FYI the AC Hurricanes are rated to 150psi, so I can run road tires/pressures. (But I’m dreaming of the manufacturer who will provide a wheelset that weighs less than 1,400g, can handle 225lb rider, accept pressure of 140psi – so I can use my cross bike as my road bike wink wink)

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